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THE HOME PAGE
CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE SOMERSET 3D GALLERY CLICK TO SEE ALL OTHER NON SOMERSET 3D GALLERIES CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE DOWNLOAD PAGE FOR THE FREE WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER CLICK HERE TO VISIT HE SOMERSET3D SHOP   GO HERE FOR ALL THE INFORMATION YOU WILL NEED TO ENJOY THIS WEB SITE

Welcome to the info page. Here you will find out a little about me and my photography, how anaglyphs are created and lots more.

For more links relating to Somerset please click here.

The sites included are web sites that I prefer not to link to a specific town or village.

 

To purchase BOOKS, DVDs, CDs, T-SHIRTS, 3D GLASSES, and more visit

THE SOMERSET 3D SHOP.

For more web sites on photography and photographers that feature Somerset please click here.

For other web sites that feature 3D photography click here.

 

I am now adding 3D photographs from other non Somerset places that I have visited. These will appear in GALLERY 2. Keep checking the NEWS for updates.

The easiest way to navigate this page is to check out the FAQ's first and see if the question has already been answered. If not then drop me an email by clicking the link below.

Click here to download the custom made WoollyAnaglyph maker.

I'll attempt to answer your question/s as promptly as possible and will add all relevant questions and answers to the existing FAQ's list.

I recommend that you press F11 on your keypad to view the site full screen and to take regular breaks (about every 15 minutes) when viewing the pictures.

FOR THE LATEST UPDATES AND NEWS ON THIS WEB SITE CLICK HERE.

WHILST YOU ARE HERE YOU CAN LEARN SOME ZUMMERZET OR VISIT THE MEDIA PAGE.

Contact me via the link below & please put 'Somerset 3d' in the subject box.

contactme@somerset3d.co.uk

 

A big THANK YOU to all those who helped in the creation of this site.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WHAT ARE ANAGLYPHS?

HOW CAN I MAKE ANAGLYPHS?

WHERE CAN I GET A PAIR OF 3d GLASSES?

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO VIEW THE PICTURES?

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN TAKING 3d PHOTOGRAPHS?

WHY ARE THERE SO MANY PICTURES OF CHURCHES?

WHY ISN'T THERE MORE INFORMATION GIVEN ON THE TOWN/VILLAGE?

WHY ISN'T MY TOWN/VILLAGE FEATURED?

 

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Alan Woollard Photography

 

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Somerset3d News

 

24th November 2012.

I'm currently uploading 2d versions of all the town and village photos that feature on this website onto Flickr, so click here if you wish to take a look. Ideally I'd love to spend a good amount of time giving the Somerset3d website a much needed revamp. Alas, the time it would take is just not available to me right now.

Many thanks for your continued support.

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

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If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

16th July 2012.

A long time since my last update. Just thought I ought to make new visitors aware that this website is still live. There are just not enough hours in the day, days in the week etc to be able to give everything the time required. Unfortunately the economic situation has hit hard too. Petrol is much more expensive now and so going for a drive to explore is no longer viable. That said I have made use of the odd day out we've had so there are some new locations I will add as soon as I get the chance.

Many thanks for your continued support.

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

11th January 2011.

Just a very quick update to wish you all a very happy 2011 and to announce that the Woolly Anaglyph Maker (WAM) has been updated. The new version includes a button that will enable you to create anaglyphs that are compatible with the ColorCode 3d glasses. The download is available here.

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

11th November 2010

For the first time since Somerset3d was launched I am taking a break from the website. This will enable me to give more time to the many 'other' projects that have been on-hold over the past five years.

The website will remain but will not be updated until I return.

If you’d like to have email notification of any future updates then please send your email address to contactme@somerset3d.co.uk, and I will put you on the mailing list. Please put Somerset3d updates in the subject box.

(I will not share your email address with anyone else).

Many thanks for your continued visits and support.

Regards,

Alan Woollard (Somerset3d Webmaster).

 

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

2nd November 2010

TV SERIES - 4 pages of 3d's on TURN BACK TIME: THE HGH STREET, a Wall to Wall produced TV Series filmed in SHEPTON MALLET.

An early update this week to coincide with the first episode here in the UK of the BBC TV series TURN BACK TIME: THE HIGH STREET.

BBC One brings the story of the British High Street to life in Turn Back Time, an exciting and ambitious new series that transports four empty shops and a group of contemporary shop-keeping families back to the High Street's heyday in the 1870s, before propelling them through a century of dizzying change right up to the Seventies. In the picturesque market square in Shepton Mallet, Somerset, the families' lives are turned upside down as they get to grips with how shopkeepers lived and worked in six key eras of British history. Laced with real-life entertainment, family drama and human endeavour, the families have to deal with whatever history throws at them. Alongside all the usual pressures of running a business, they'll have to learn traditional skills and make their own produce by hand – each episode throwing new challenges their way as the High Street marches on into the modern era. They are overseen by Turn Back Time's own unique chamber of commerce (Gregg Wallace, Tom Herbert and Juliet Gardiner), which sets the challenges for each era and enforces accurate rules and regulations – revealing who has delivered on best customer service and weekly sales as the decades tick by. The families will also live the life of each period, dressing, eating and playing as they once would have done – from 18-hour working days and wartime rationing, to evenings of entertainment sitting around the wireless, they'll experience it all. But these are no museums. The shops will be serving modern-day customers who are used to the pace and convenience of 21st-century shopping. While the shopkeepers struggle with pounds, shillings and pence, will their customers welcome the old-fashioned delights of personal service and hand-delivered goods or will queuing, weighing and hand-wrapping tax their patience? Source: The BBC.

Unfortunately, due to work commitments, I was only able to cover the Victorian era in this series. I hope you enjoy the series and my 3d's. A special thank you goes to the nice people at SOFT82.COM for the awards given to the splendid WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER. Thanks guys, it's great that this little bit of software has got these awards.

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

28th October 2010

LOCATION REVISITED -5 pages of 3d's on SHEPTON MALLET, and the final installment of the BASICS for OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET is on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

This weeks' update is a revisit to my home town. Shepton Mallet has been an industrial powerhouse for centuries and at least 120 generations have spent their lives in this small, self-contained and friendly market town. ‘Sceapton’ or Sheep Fold was once an Anglo Saxon village. Over the next few centuries it grew into a prosperous market town, its wealth based on sheep and wool. The fine parish church, the market cross and the ‘shambles’ all date from this period. Its name is also synonymous with its prison, built in 1610 and the country’s oldest working jail. Still operational today, it housed French prisoners of war during the Napoleonic Wars and, during the Second World War, Cell 10 was used to protect some of the nation’s treasures., including the Domesday Book, a copy of the Magna Carter and the log of Nelson’s Flagship, HMS Victory. The magnificent 19th century building ‘The Anglo’ was built in 1864 to brew light beers for export to all parts of the British Empire. Indeed it is alleged that it was the first brewery in the country to brew lager. Originally called ‘The Anglo Bavarian Brewery’, its name was changed to ‘The Anglo’ at the beginning of the First World War in order to dissociate itself from any German connection. Shepton Mallet is also home to the Showerings family who were responsible for Babycham, the sparkling perry drink that took the nation by storm in the 1950’s. Sources: Somerset Life Magazine and the Webmaster.

 

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

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If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

21st October 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WATERLIP, and the BASICS for OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET continues on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

It was at Waterlip that Edward Strode, of the wealthy Strode family of nearby Cranmore, built a range of Almshouses in 1699. Sadly, in 1701, he was to lose his life in a duel whilst in France. Today there is little to be found in the village. Its tiny chapel has since been converted for private dwelling. Sources: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush & The Webmaster.

 

CLICK THE BANNER TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

14th October 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BODDEN, and there's more OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

The tiny settlement of Bodden was founded in 1541 by Earl Michael Bodden (1512-1569). It lies at a t-junction of two narrow country lanes. Consisting mainly of farms and a few houses the area has a tranquillity and peacefulness about it, only broken by the occasional horse and rider and, of course, the farm traffic. The nearby Ingsdons Hill offers wonderful views across to nearby Shepton Mallet. One former resident, Trish Bodden (1753-1777) disguised herself as a man to fight in the American War of Independence. She was killed at Saratoga. Another, Ambrowse Bowden, was the first English colonist to settle in Maine. Source: The Webmaster and the Internet.

 

CLICK TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Share |

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

7th October 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - GREAT ELM, there's a NEW FEATURE on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page and SOMERSET3D is 5 YEARS OLD this month.

Great Elm is so named to distinguish it from the village of Little Elm (since developed as the village of Chantry). South-west from the village lies Tedbury Camp, an earthwork where a pot of Roman coins was dug up in 1691. The manor was held for the first 200 years from the Domesday Book by the Giffards. Later it was owned by the Hodges family, and then the Strachey’s. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

On SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET we start a new feature called OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET. It is a course of lessons for you to study over the next few months or so. Once completed you should be able to understand and be understood by the locals when you visit us next year.

So, we are 5 YEARS OLD this month. I must say that the time has flown by and it really doesn't seem that long ago when I started doing all of this. Sometimes I've struggled, for various reasons, to keep a stock of villages ready for the weekly update but, thanks to the understanding of my lovely wife, and the occasional trip out visiting 9 or more locations in one day, I've managed to keep the updates going. Thank you all for continuing to visit this site and for the feedback I've been getting over the years. It really is most appreciated. To celebrate our 5th birthday I have created another t-shirt design to join the existing range. I hope you all have a great rest of the week and a wonderful weekend.

CLICK TO VISIT THE T-SHIRT SHOP

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

30th September 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHANTRY and there's another entry over on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Chantry is a former industrial village based on the older hamlet of Little Elm, which was founded by James Fussell (1774-1845) of the family of edge-tool makers from Mells. Here he built (circa 1825) his solid uncompromising mansion, the Chantry, believed to take its name from the fact it stood on land with which a chantry at Whatley church had been endowed. The ornamental lake below the mansion provided water powerfor the Fussell mills and around the house cottages were built that housed workers at the Chantry and Railroad works in the valley. Chantry is one of Somerset’s eight ‘Thankful Villages’, a term coined by the wrier Arthur Mee in the 1930’s to recognise those villages that suffered no loss of men during the First World War. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

For those of you interested I am now putting 2D versions of a selection of my Somerset 3D's on my Flickr website. Not all photos taken for 3D look as good in 2D, and vice versa, so I am only selecting those that work. Let me know what you think.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

23rd September 2010

 

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CLOFORD and there's more SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET for you to muster over.

The manor at Cloford was held from the 16th century by the Horner family from nearby Mells. It was this family that, in 1633, built the tall Cloford House. The church of St Mary has a Perpendicular west tower and contains two monuments to the Horner family who lived in the settlement, Maurice (d.1621) and Sir George (d.1676). Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

16th September 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PITMINSTER with TWO pages of photos and there's yet another word to review in this weeks SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Originally called Pipeminster, meaning ‘the minster or mother church of Pippa’s people’, the small village of Pitminster lies at the edge of the Blackdown Hills to the south of the county town of Taunton. In 938 King Athelstan, Alfred’s grandson, gave the estate to the Bishop of Winchester and thereafter it formed part of the huge manor of Taunton Deane. During the Civil War Lord George Goring lodged in the village, where trees were hastily felled to act as barricades for holding back the pursuers. Following Monmouth’s defeat, fugitives sought refuge in the countryside hereabouts. A double locked wooden coffer containing a horde of French coins, probably intended to have been retrieved by the rebel followers, was discovered by accident in a local farmhouse. A similar hoard was found at nearby Blagdon Hill. The 13th century church of SS Margaret and Andrew contain impressive effigies of the Colles family of Barton Grange. Sources: The Somerset Book of Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

9th September 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED -CORFE and there's a new word to learn in this weeks SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Although not mentioned in the Domesday Book Corfe has existed since Norman times. Its name is said to derive from an ancient word meaning ‘gap’ or ‘pass’ and this is borne out by the cleft in the hillside which takes the Honiton road over the Blackdown Hills from the village. In the 18th century some hopefuls’ of Corfe went in search of the legendary riches associated with Castle Neroche, which is about 3 miles to the south-east. They took with them a local parson armed with salt and holy water, and arranged for the church bells to ring out as protection against the Devil, who reputedly guarded the treasure. Excavations began and, the story goes, ‘One man struck a large stone, which on lifting out disclosed an iron-bound trunk, the treasure chest! In his excitement he rapped out an almost blasphemous oath, and immediately the trunk sank down back into the large hole it had previously occupied which then closed up. Disheartened, they left their tunnel, but came back the next evening and for a few more times, but ill-fortune dogged them. One stubbed his hand on an old tree stump, another had his foot crushed, and finally, one sultry evening when the whole air was tense with a brooding thunderstorm, their nerves gave way in panic, and with yells of terror, they dropped their tools, and in deadly fear scattered to the woods, to find their way later to the security of the village. Once there they could hardly speak coherently to explain what had happened save that “there was devils up in the mount, they know’d there was, cos they’d yer’d em and zeed ‘em too”. They nearly all took sick, some died in a raging fever, other recovered, but shaken and broken men: and all the band, through terrible accidents or lingering sickness were dead before the year was out’. Sources: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

I've been tidying up the website so some of you may find some of the links have changed. I noticed last week that there were two versions of the GALLERY pages and SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET. The old versions had the extention HTM and the new versions HTML. Some of the links took you to the old versions and these are not being updated. I have gone through the whole site and corrected all the old links to the pages with the HTM to the new versions ending with HTML. Still with me? Basically it means you may find some links won't take you to the old page anymore and you may need to refresh the page to be able to view the correct version. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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2nd September 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WEST BUCKLAND and there's a video entry in this weeks SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET for you to watch.

West Buckland was one of the villages to possess a Holy Thorn Tree, originally taken as a cutting from the Glastonbury Thorn, which is said to have sprouted from the staff of Joseph of Arimathea. The village, formerly named ‘Bocland’ knew importance in Saxon times as ‘lands in possession of the King’. The West Buckland Hoard, containing a bronze bracelet, torque, palstave and scabbard, was accidentally discovered during the 19th century in the course of excavating a drain. The village is reputedly the birthplace of Sir George Bond, Lord Mayor of London in the Armada year. Sources: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

 

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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26th August 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WOOTTON COURTENAY and there's a video entry new word in this weeks SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET for you to learn.

William the Conqueror gave Wootton Courtenay to William of Falaise after the Conquest. In the 13th century the manor passed on to John de Courtenay, whose family later became earls of Devon and gave their name to both manor and parish. The church of All Saints has a 13th century west tower, finished off by a saddleback roof dated 1866. The remainder, including the octagonal font, is mainly 15th century but, in common with most Somerset churches, was drastically restored in the 19th century. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

There was meant to be a video entry in this week's Speakin Zummerzet but I'm having trouble with uploading the video files. I need to work out what the problem is before trying again.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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19th August 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ALLERFORD with a two page feature and there's more in SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET for you to enjoy.

Allerford is a wonderfully attractive hamlet and it’s bridge, Packhorse inn and cottage form one of the most photographed views in the county. The former village school, established in 1822, now houses a museum, with antique tools, photographic exhibition, craft demonstrations and a recreated Victorian schoolroom with children’s costumes for dressing up. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

12th August 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PORLOCK with a two page feature and there's another entry on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you to enjoy.

Porlock has attracted many unwanted attentions of raiders during its history. In 918 the inhabitants warded off the attacks of Danish pirates and in 1052 Harold Godwinsson, who set sail from Ireland with 9 ships on an expedition to plunder and murder, attacked the place and set it ablaze. The church was said to have been truncated in a storm of 1700. It was dedicated to St Dubricius, reputed to have officiated at the wedding of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. The story goes that this Celtic saint so loved Porlock that he settled here and lived to the extremely ripe old age of 150 years. Source: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

5th August 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ANSFORD plus more SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET and two new t-shirt designs in the GIFTS & CLOTHING SHOP.

After the Conquest Ansford manor was granted to Walter de Douia and subsequently held with Castle Cary. Housing development in the village in the 1970s revealed tools and pottery of the Neolithic, early Bronze and Romano-British periods. Ansford’s significance lay in its position on the main road from Bristol and Bath, south to the resorts of Sidmouth and Weymouth, and was reflected in the early 19th century by the presence of no fewer than five inns on Ansford Hill. In the Old Parsonage at the corner of Tucker’s Lane was born the Rev James Woodforde in 1740. His diary, after that of Samuel Pepys, is one of the most famous in the English language and includes the period (1764-1773) when James lived here as curate. He chronicled the everyday and the unusual: his own eating, drinking and card-playing, as well as the murder of Mrs Tucker by her husband with a hammer in 1775. The church is full of Woodforde memorials, including the one that James inscribed to the memory of his parents. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Thank you to all the friends on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET FACEBOOK page who have contributed suggestions for t-shirt slogans. I hope you will be happy with the two new designs in the the shop this week. Thanks to Bob, Donna and John.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

29th July 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COLE and three pages of anaglyphs of CLOVELLY in DEVON. Plus more SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET to listen to.

Cole is a tiny hamlet south-west of nearby Bruton. There is not much in the way of information on Cole, except for a small snippet on the internet relating to the Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway, as follows:

Cole was no destination in itself, but was the agreed point of meeting up with the Dorset Central Railway. The important town of Bruton lay nearby, but its topography made a closer approach difficult. The Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth Railway had been opened in 1856, giving broad gauge access to the Great Western Railway (GWR) system, but the Somerset Central wanted only to get standard gauge access to the Dorset Central Railway and the South Coast. Parliamentary powers were sought and the standard gauge was specified, but pressure from the broad gauge B&ER - who feared loss of the feeder traffic from the line it had supported - led to a requirement to lay broad gauge and to make a junction with the Wilts Somerset and Weymouth where the lines would cross. The line from Glastonbury to Cole opened on 3 February 1862 and mixed gauge track was laid, although the required connection to the Wilts Somerset & Weymouth was never opened. Glastonbury to Highbridge and Burnham was converted to mixed gauge at the same time. Intermediate stations between Glastonbury and Cole were West Pennard, Pylle and Evercreech. Source: The internet.

One reason Clovelly remains unspoilt is that the village has belonged to the Rous family since 1738 and they have ensured it has been spared modern defacements such as telegraph poles and ‘street furniture’. The only access to the 14th century quay is on foot or by donkey. The only other form of transport are the sledges which are used to deliver weekly supplies. During the summer months there are regular boat trips around the bay, and the Jessica Hettie travels daily to nearby Lundy Island with timings that allow passengers to spend some six hours there, to watch the seals and the abundant wildlife. Source: The Guide to Rural England – The West Country by Country Living Magazine.

The eagle eyed amongst you may have spotted a new addition to the main menu. I have just launched the Somerset3d shop for T-Shirts and more. There are just a few designs on offer at the moment but more designs will be added from time to time. Please have a browse and tell me what you think. For this weekend only (31st July to 1st August 2010 inc) there is a FREE P&P offer at the t-shirt shop. Just enter FREEWEEKEND at the checkout.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses you can purchase a pair via the SHOP.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.  

BOOK STORE & SHOP

See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books (and more) based on Somerset from the BOOK-STORE & T-Shirts from the SHOP.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

22nd July 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WHEDDON CROSS and there's still more to learn with SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Wheddon Cross is a modern hamlet which has grown around what has been described as ‘surely well up in the list for the worst cross-roads in England’. I can do nothing more but agree whole-heartedly. The local inn is called The Rest and be Thankful and is a grateful site for many a thirsty traveller. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

15th July 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HADSPEN and there's more to learn with SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

The estate of Hadspen was bought in 1747 by Vickris Dickinson, a Bristol merchant (related to the family at Kingweston), who built here a 5-bay classical mansion set in its own park. The property was acquired in 1785 by Henry Hobhouse, a Bristol barrister, whose family hailed from Minehead. His descendants have lived here ever since. The eight acres of sheltered Edwardian gardens at Hadspen, set against a woodland backdrop, are open to the public. Restored by Penelope Hobhouse in the 1970s they were adopted in 1986 by a Canadian couple, Nori and Sandra Pope. To a traditional English garden the couple have added their own transatlantic flair. Access is from the Castle Cary to Wincanton road (A371).

Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Regular followers will have noted that I use the book by Robin Bush (Somerset The Complete Guide) as a regular source of information on the towns and villages I feature. It is with great sadness that I report his death, on 22nd June 2010, aged 67. Although I never met the man his books demonstrated his love for the county of Somerset and, though he will be greatly missed by all who knew him, his memory will live on via his many publicaions and on this website. Farewell Robin Bush, may you rest in peace.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

8th July 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED -Two pages for DULVERTON and two more pages are added for SELWORTHY, and don't forget SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Dulverton is an unspoilt market town situated to the east of the River Barle, here spanned by the medieval Barle Bridge. Laying within the royal forest of Exmoor it has been a major centre for hunting since at least 1365, when Sir Robert Coren was prosecuted for killing a royal stag here whilst out hunting foxes. Dulverton probably formed part of the estate of the West Saxon kings and was held by Harold II, killed at the Battle of Hastings. It is likely the town developed an urban complexion in the 14th century with a dependence on the woollen industry. It is thought that the town began around a large market place below and in front of the church, which was gradually encroached on by narrow crowded streets. In the church of All Saints is a window to commemorate Sir George Williams (1821-1905) who was born nearby and was the founder of the YMCA. The town was frequently referred to in R.D. Blackmore’s novel Lorna Doone as being the home of John Ridd’s Uncle Huckabuck. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

With this weeks' bumper 110 anaglyphs update there are now more than 6,000 3d photographs for you to enjoy. Spread the word.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

1st July 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SELWORTHY with the first two pages of a four page feature, plus there's more to listen and learn on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Selworthy was held before the Conquest by Edith, Queen of Edward the Confessor, but after Hastings was given, together with nearby Allerford and Bossington, to Ralph de Limesi. Thereafter it descended like the manor of Luccombe until inherited by the Aclands in 1802. The cottages around the green were largely put up in 1828 for retired retainers by Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, who was also responsible for much of the woodland planting in the area. Selworthy forms the focus of the Holnicote (pronounced Honeycut) estate of over 12,000 acres and given to the National Trust in 1944 by the late Sir Richard Acland. Lying in an area of exceptionally beautiful countryside the village is acknowledged as to be one of the loveliest villages in England. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

24th June 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BROMPTON REGIS and there's still more to listen and learn on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Before the Conquest Brompton Regis was held by Gytha, mother of King Harold II who died at Hastings. The estate was then seized by William the Conquerer which explains the suffix ‘Regis’ – ‘of the King’. The place has the alternative name of Kings Brompton. By the later 12th century the manor had been granted to William de Say, who founded Barlynch (‘barley hill’) Priory, a small house of Augustinian canons, in the west of the parish beside the River Exe. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Drop me a line on . Click here to visit the Somerset3d entry and here for Speakin Zummerzet. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

17th June 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BROMPTON RALPH and TAVISTOCK in DEVON, plus there's more to listen and learn on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Brompton Ralph is a small village at the eastern end of the Brendon Hills. The estate here was given to Glastonbury Abbey by Queen Frithogyth circa 729-40, passed to Brictric by 1066 and after the Conquest to William de Mohun of Dunster. The Mohun tenant in 1166 was William son of Durand, whose son Ralph gave his name to the place. Thereafter by 1212 the property was divided between Ralph’s three daughters, becoming the manors of Brompton Ralph, Brompton Fulford and Brompton Jacob. The main manor was held by the lords of Portman from 1861 until circa 1920. John Toms, a glass stainer, was born in the village around 1914 and his work can be seen in several nearby churches. In 1913 a descendant of his visited from the USA and paid for the restoration of the ancient screen in the church in honour of his memory. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Tavistock is one of Devon’s four stannary towns, so named from the latin word for tin – stannum. The others are Ashburton, Chagford and Plympton and these towns were the only places licensed to weigh and stamp the metal extracted from the moor. For most of its recorded history Tavistock has had only two owners. Tavistock abbey and the Russell family. The abbey was founded beside the river Tavy around 974, close to a Saxon stockade, or Stoc, now incorporated into the town’s name. In 1539 Henry VIII closed the Abbey and sold the building, along with its vast estates to John Russell, whose family, as Earls and Dukes of Bedford, owned most of the town until 1911. The present town centre is essentially a creation of the Russell family after virtually obliterating the once glorious abbey, creating a completely new town plan. Source: The Guide to Rural England – The West Country by Country Living Magazine.

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If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

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MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
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Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
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The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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10th June 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CLUTTON and there's still more to learn on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Clutton was recorded in the Domesday survey as Clutone. It was given by William the Conquerer to his favourite, the Bishop of Coutance. In Edward III’s reign in the 14th century, it is mentioned as being left by Robert Gyere to John de Greville by payment of a ‘rose’. This John de Greville was an ancestor of the Earls of Warwick, whose association with Clutton continued through the centuries until just after the Second World War. Now the only visible links with the Warwick family are the foundation stone at the village school, the inscription on the church organ, and The Warwick Arms inn. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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3rd June 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BISHOP SUTTON and there's more to learn on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

In the early 1920’s 80% of the working population in Farmborough were miners. Many working nearby at Pensford Colliery. By this time the Manor House (built in 1667) had gradually declined in importance with the church and the rectory now the focal points for the villagers. The grounds of the Rectory often held lively garden parties with the schoolchildren usually called upon to entertain. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute

Another early update this week as I'm out again and not sure what time I'll be back.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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27th May 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - FARMBOROUGH and of course there's more on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

In the early 1920’s 80% of the working population in Farmborough were miners. Many working nearby at Pensford Colliery. By this time the Manor House (built in 1667) had gradually declined in importance with the church and the rectory now the focal points for the villagers. The grounds of the Rectory often held lively garden parties with the schoolchildren usually called upon to entertain. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute

An early update this week as I'm very busy Wednesday night and, rather than be late I'd rather be early.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

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20th May 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WYKE CHAMPFLOWER and the last 2 pages on a 4 page special for LACOCK. Plus there's more on SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Wyke Champflower is a hamlet west of Bruton. The latter part of its name reflects it’s ownership by the Champflower family by 1166 until the mid 13th century. The Georgian manor-house is attached to the small chapel of St Peter. There was a 12th century chapel here that was ‘built during time of war’ and served by the canons of Bruton Priory until 1539 and by curates thereafter. Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Period drama enthusiasts will know that Lacock village has been used as a location for well known TV series’ such as Cranford, Emma and Pride & Prejudice (1967 & 1995) and the Abbey for scenes in the Harry Potter movies. There are many other lesser well known TV programmes and films that have made use of this location, such as: Treasure Hunt (1983), Robin of Sherwood (1984), Moll Flanders (1996), Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000). The Mayor of Casterbridge (2003) and The Other Boleyn Girl (2008). Source: The internet.

Just in case you didn't see last weeks message, I have placed some details on the MY PROFILE page. I'm going to add details in stages so have a read of the first installment and I'll advise you of further entries as they are uploaded.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

 

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13th May 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BAYFORD and the first 2 pages on a 4 page special for LACOCK in WILTSHIRE. Plus there's another word for you with SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

There is very little information to be found on Bayford. In searching the internet I came across two entries;
BAYFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of StokeTrister, union of Wincanton, hundred of Norton Ferris, E. division of Somerset, 1¼ mile (E. N. E.) from Wincanton; containing 222 inhabitants. From: 'Bayford - Beanacre', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), and from the Somerset Gateway website; John Wesley - Somerset Journal Extracts - September 1764. Mon. 10. — I rode to Shepton-Mallet, and preached at noon, on, “One thing is needful.” Only one man, a common disturber, behaved amiss. I was constrained to rebuke him sharply. All the people turned their eyes upon him; and for once he was ashamed. In the evening I preached at Bayford, near Wincanton, and at seven in the morning. Source: The internet.

Lacock Village (pronounced Laycock), dating back to the 13th-century, remains largely unchanged over the centuries and has many limewashed, half-timbered and stone houses. During the Middle Ages Lacock became a prosperous and thriving town through its wool industry. The village was well placed for communications, sited as it was on the 'cloth road' from London and the River Avon, which gave access to the sea at Avonmouth near Bristol. Lacock Abbey was founded in the early 13th-century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury. Ela was the daughter of William, Earl of Salisbury and was married to William Longespee, the illegitimate son of Henry II. William was one of the most powerful barons of the time. He was a witness of the Magna Carta and with Ela laid the fourth and fifth foundation stones of Salisbury Cathedral. Ela founded two religious houses in his memory on the same day, involving a journey of 16 miles, one at Hinton Charterhouse for Carthusian Monks and the other at Lacock for Augustinian Canonesses. The Abbey was built with stone obtained from Ralph Croc, who owned a quarry at Hazelbury near Box, Wiltshire and with timbers from the royal forest. Generally, the Abbey prospered throughout the Middle Ages. The rich farmlands of its endowment by Ela ensured a sizeable income from wool throughout its medieval life. The nuns were mostly ladies of good family, usually between fifteen and twenty-five in number but the community was increased by a number of lay sisters, who looked after the more menial tasks, and guests who came for hospitality. The fine medieval cloisters, sacristy, chapter house and monastic rooms of the Abbey have survived largely intact. Source: The National Trust.

Finally, I have placed some details on the MY PROFILE page. I'm going to add details in stages so have a read of the first installment and I'll advise you further entries as they are uploaded.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

The 1st installment now online ready to view. Keep an eye out for the next chapter.

 

 

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6th May 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - RUDGE, and there's another word for you to view and listen to on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

Rudge is a hamlet in situated in the civil parish of Beckington. The local pub, The Full Moon, has developed from a small pub into a thriving business, and is a popular place to visit for meals. The electricity supply to the hamlet wasn’t completed until 1950, with piped water following 4 years later. The Methodist Chapel in the centre of the settlement is the only surviving public building. Source: The internet.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for those of you overseas. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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29th April 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - OLD CLEEVE, and there's another word on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you too have a go at.

Old Cleeve is just over a mile from the coast and contains many 18th and 19th century cottages, several of them thatched. A loop from the West Somerset Railway runs nearby. The 15th century church of St Andrew is built on the site of the original Saxon church. The porch floor, with a heart laid out in cobbles dates from 1614. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

The pictures for Old Cleeve were taken this weekend just gone. If you'd like to know more about the visit to the area, including a story relating to the Blossom tree on page two of the village pictures please visit my wife's blog at Suzy's Vintage Attic.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to and videos.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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22nd April 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CAMELEY, and there's yet more SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET for you to enjoy.

Cameley was once a hive of industry, with brickworks, coalmines and quarries. When these closed in the 19th century many left the village, which has dwindled into little more than a tranquil hamlet. The church of st james was decribed by Sir John Betjeman as a ‘Rip van Winkle church’, as if it had slept for 150 years. Although a small church it is wonderfully rich in wall paintings, with the earliest thought to be 11th century. During my years of visiting the towns and villages of Somerset I have seen many churches. I have to say, to date, this is definitely my favourite. The church was declared pastorally redundant in 1976 and in 1981 it was vested in the Redundant churches Fund, now The Churches Conservation Trust. This church is one of England’s unspoilt treasures. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute and The Churches Conversation Trust booklet of the church.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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15th April 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STOWEY, and there's another entry for you to discover on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

The Saxon name for Stowey was Stawe or Stalwage, meaning the steep way. At the top of the lovely climbing street is the church, dedicated to St Mary and St Nicholas and dating from the 13th century. It is set in the centre of Stowey Hill and next to it is Stowey House, a manor type building now in use as a farmhouse with a super farm shop at its rear. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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8th April 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SHOSCOMBE, and there's another entry for you to ponder over on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Shoscombe was one of the many colliery villages in the north of Somerset and evidence of this can still be seen in the remains of mines and miners cottages scattered around the area. In July 2004 a ceremony was held in Radstock to celebrate the opening of the Radstock to Shoscombe section of the National Cycle Network Route 24. This section is part of the ‘Colliers Way’ segment of the national route and is so called to reflect the fact that it travels through the heart of the North Somerset coalfields. As part of the ceremony school children from the village school cycled from the village to Radstock where they were presented with certificates after recently passing a Cycle Safety Training course. Near Shoscombe Vale are the remains of pill-boxes and tank traps. These were part of the Stop Green Line, an anti-tank defence line set up to protect Bristol during the Second World War.

Source: Bath and North East Somerset Council.

Speakin Zummerzet now has its own page on . Click here to visit. Are you on Facebook? If so why not become a friend.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

1st April 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - TELLISFORD, and there's yet another entry for you to ponder over on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

Tellisford is a small village that was partly destroyed by a major fire in 1785. The River Frome runs along the east of the village and here forms the boundary between Somerset and Wiltshire. The manor was acquired by the Hungerfords of Farleigh in the early 15th century, who used the manor-house and a fulling mill here to endow their chantry chapel in Farleigh Castle. The cloth industry continued in the parish until 1911, the mill being reckoned as one of the largest in the Frome valley in 1821. The church of All Saints has a late Norman south doorway and a font of the same period. The rest is largely Perpendicular with a pulpit dated 1608 and was heavily restored in 1854. Most of the monuments commemorate 19th century members of the Crabb family who held the mills here and lived at Crabb Hall. Tellisford has the distinction of being a Double Thankful Village, meaning that the village lost no men in either World War. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

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25th March 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BERKLEY, and there's another entry for you to read and listen to on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

The name Berkley derives from the Old English Berchelei, a clearing in a birch wood. It is first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 and it suggests it was an agricultural settlement and contained a mill. The church is Georgian and, according to Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the authority on historical architecture, as ‘small, but the best Georgian church in any Somerset village’. Dedicated to St Mary it is a square, crowned by a central octagonal dome which is decorated with ornamental rococo plasterwork and supported on four pillars. Ghostly goings on have previously been recorded in the area with a tale of an exorcism of a young maid named Cissy Watts at Berkley House and of singing being heard in the church followed by sightings of a ghost coming down the road and disappearing into the cemetery. Sources: St Mary’s, Berkley. A History and Guide by Michael McGarvie, The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation of Women’s institute, The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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18th March 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - NORTH WOOTTON, and there's yet another entry for you to hear on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

In the Domesday Book North Wootton was called Utone, the landholder was Edred and the land owned by Glastonbury Abbey. Population was recorded as 75-85 people. The river redlake runs through the village. This joins with the Whitelake and other waterways flowing into the Hartlake River and on to the Somerset Levels. The village school closed in the 1960’s and is now a private residence, as is the old cider mill, the chapel and the millhouse to name but a few. The village has remained a quiet oasis away from the rush of nearby Wells, Glastonbury and Shepton Mallet. Source: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation of Women’s institute.

NB: I have now converted the Speakin Zummerzet videos to the WMA and AVI formats. This will enable those who prefer not to install Adobe Flash to view the featured videos.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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11th March 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LAMYATT, and there's another entry for you to hear on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

The name Lamyatt probably means ‘swinging gate’. Excavations on the summit of Lamyatt Beacons have revealed a significant Romano-British temple of circa 300-400 AD and produced statuettes including those of Mercury, Mars, Minerva and Hercules. Some 16 associated east-west burials of the 6th-8th centuries may indicate a very early Christian settlement there. The manor passed into the hands of Glastonbury Abbey in Saxon times, possibly with the Ditcheat estate in the 9th century, but after the Norman Conquest was granted to Nigel the physician. By the beginning of the 13th century it was held by Robert de Columbers, whose decendants gave way to a branch of the Rodney family, by whom the manor was split up and sold in the early 17th century. Source:  Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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4th March 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PRESTLEIGH, and there's another entry on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you to have a go at.

Prestleigh is a small village on the A371 between Shepton Mallet and Castle Cary. The Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway once went through the village. The viaduct that carried the railway over the village was demolished in 1996. Today it is the nearest location to the Royal Bath & West Showground which holds many major events throughout the year. Source:  Me.

If you require a pair of anaglyph glasses I am now selling them at £1.00 (Inc P&P) for UK residents and £1.00 plus P&P for overseas residents. Please contact me for a quote for postage to your country by emailing me at contactme@somerset3d.co.uk. Payment can be made via the Somerset3d PayPal account at somerset3d@gmail.com.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming really soon now,

honestly

 

 

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25th February 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - Two pages of photos of NETHER STOWEY, and there's another entry to listen to on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

In 1796 the poet Samuel Coleridge, his wife Sarah and their son moved to a small thatched cottage in Lime Street, Nether Stowey, adjoining the garden of their great friend Thomas Poole. It was here Coleridge wrote The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, Kubla Khan and the first part of Christobel. The house is now the property of the National Trust. It was Coleridge’s friendship with Poole that caused him to move here, and it was Wordsworth’s friendship with Coleridge that resulted in Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy moving to nearby Alfoxton. Source:  The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

 

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of February 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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18th February 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LYDEARD St LAWRENCE and there's another entry on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you to listen to.

From Saxon times the estate at Lydeard St Lawrence was owned the bishops of Winchester with their great manor at Taunton Deane, although granted 1081-6 to Wlward by William the Conquerer. Subsequently it was held with or under Combe Florey and indeed the Domesday estate of Pylegh (Lega in 1086), as hamlet south of the village. The main manor was acquired in the 18th century by the Hancock family. The church of St Lawrence was granted to Taunton Priory by Simon de Florey in the latter end of the 12th century. The patronage was held by the Portman family for nearly two centuries from 1660. On the north side of the chancel is a monument to Dr John Goodwin, rector 1614-29, succeeded by his son, also John, who suffered after the Civil War, and was ejected from the living. John Venn (1586-1650), whose family held Pylegh, was a noted Roundhead Colonel during the Civil War, governor of Windsor Castle, a commissioner at the trial of and a signatory to the death warrant of Charles I. Source:  Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of February 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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11th February 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHEDDON FITZPAINE and there's another video entry on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you to look at.

In Saxon times Cheddon Fitzpaine formed part of the outfaring of Taunton Deane manor but after the Conquest was granted to the great Roger Arundel, a half share descending in 1198 to Robert Fitzpayn, whose family obtained the other half in 1224 and held the estate until 1393. The manor was bought in the 16th century by Thomas More of Taunton Priory from whom it passed by marriage to the Methuens of Corsham, Wiltshire. The living passed with the manor until granted to William Clifton of Barrington in the 16th century, whose family sold it to the Warres of nearby Hestercombe, several whom served as vicars. The church of St Mary retains its 13th century tower with large gargoyles, but the rest of the building was over-restored in 1861, William Otherie was prosecuted in 1623 for urinating in his pew during the sermon. Source:  Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Following on from last weeks announcement of the return of the blog I have decided to switch applications from Blogspot to WordPress. It will take me a while to get to grips with the new layout and how things work but, hopefully, a more enjoyable blogging experience can be had. Click here for the new blog and here for the old.

 

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of February 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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4th February 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - KINGSTON St MARY, and there's this week's entry on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page for you to look at and listen to.

Kingston St Mary is situated on the southern edges of the Quantock Hills in a traditional area of cider growing. The village gave its name to an old fashioned cider apple, the Kingston Black, which was reputed to be ‘a sweet, slightly sharp, full cider of a pleasant and fruity flavour’. The villages crowning glory is its church, with its lofty pinnacle tower showing up particularly well against its wooded background. It is regarded as ‘among the great masterpieces of English architecture’ and reflects the wealth once generated by the cloth industry of days gone by. Many of the houses and cottages in the village are named after former residents. The oldest 16th century house is Bobbetts which was named in the 18th century after John Bobbett. It is reputed to be haunted. The house, along with several others in the village, has now been listed as a building of outstanding and architectural interest. The Grange, now an old people’s home towards the south end of the village, is a towered house of c.1860 by Sir George Gilbert Scott, where future Prime Minister Anthony Eden used to spend his boyhood holidays with the widow of his father’s cousin, Mrs Cecile Eden. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird, The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation of Women’s institute and  Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Those of you who have been following this website for some time will remember that I used to run a blog, with additional Somerset3d and other 3d news. I decided to stop blogging in 2008 as I found it difficult to put the time to it that it required. Well, despite my time still being short I have decided to resurrect the blog. There is so much going on in the 3d world at this moment in time I thought it would be wise to offer some 3d news to you from time to time. The blog will be updated as and when my time allows me. At least weekly, maybe more. Please have a look by clicking on the links in this article. You can tell me your thoughts via the comments facility.

 

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of February 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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28th January 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LEIGHTON, also LAUNCESTON in CORNWALL and there's another entry for you to look at and listen to on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

What you see as you drive through Leighton is pretty much it. Walking around to take my photographs I found a couple of buildings that had seen better days. I can find no records or information to explain why there would be two farms built in this location. Perhaps someone out there knows more. Please get in touch if you do. Source: Me.

Launceston, pronounced locally as Lawnson, is situated on the eastern edge of Bodmin Moor, close to the border with Devon. The town was a favourite with poet Sir John Betjeman and was the county's capital until 1838. Shortly after the Norman Conquest William I's half brother, Robert of Mortain, built the massive Launceston Castle. Visited by the Black Prince and seized by Cornish rebels in 1549 the castle changed hands twice during the Civil War, becoming an assize court and prison. The church of St Mary Magdalene was built in the early 1500's by local landowner Sir Henry Trecarrel. He had started building a manor house nearby but, struck down with grief after the sad death of his beloved wife and infant son, he dedicated the rest of his life to the construction of the church. Source: Guide to rural England: The West Country by Country Living Magazine.

 

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of January 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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21st January 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - RIDGEWAY and another entry comes your way on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

The small Hamlet of Ridgeway used to lay on the old A361 between Frome and Nunney Catch. The road was changed in the mid 1970’s with the old road changing to a bridle path at the west end and now the area is more tranquil. Mainly a settlement of farms and small cottages apart from a large angular building that would not be out of place in the city at the east end of the hamlet. Source: Me.

NEW - ADVERTISE ON SOMERSET3D

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of January 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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14th January 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - DEAN and a special entry in a new season of SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

The small hamlet of Dean is a place many locals will drive past on the busy A361. It contains mainly residential houses and farms along with a small chapel, which is still in use today. Dean Farmhouse and the Old Smithy both date from the 17th century. A bridle path at the back of the hamlet leads up to Cranmore Woods and Cranmore Tower. The Tower was built by John Moore Paget and was designed by Thomas Wyatt. Completed in 1865 it was used during the 2nd World War by the Home Guard and the Armed Forces as an observation post. Dean was also where the Strode family lived before their move to Cranmore Hall (Now All Hallows School) in West Cranmore. Sources: The Internet.

If you're a Terminator fan and haven't already click on the link above for Speakin Zummerzet I recommend you do so to see Arnie in a new light.

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of January 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

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7th January 2010

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CROWCOMBE and the first entry in a new season of SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET.

The church of the Holy Ghost at Crowcombe formerly had a tower with a spire. However, the spire was struck by lightning in 1725 and crashed through the roof. Behind the church in an area of wooded parkland is Crowcombe Court, built between 1725 and 1736 and regarded as one of Somerset’s architectural gems. Some former inhabitants seem reluctant to leave the place. The Elizabethan part of Crowcombe Rectory is supposedly haunted by a lady in a silvery blue dress and matching shoes who, quiet and benign, appears only occasionally, and only to children. In this locality it is customary for folk to go a-wassailing around the orchards, offering cider to one and all and presenting it to the trees. Gunshots into the trees, combined with singing and dancing all helped to keep the tree spirits on their toes and encouraged them to work well towards the next harvest. The Doniford Brook, which marks Crowcombe’s western boundary, once drove mills at Trowbridge and Leigh, where in 1803 the miller promised to bake 120 loaves a day should Napoleon invade. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

*Because of the severe weather here in Somerset the last two days have been spent at home. So I've taken the opportunity to have a good look around the website & ammend any broken links. Because of this some of you may not find your bookmarked page the next time you visit. I suggest that you bookmark this site again to ensure you don't miss out on the updates.*

SOMERSET3D is now accepting advertising for B&Bs, Guest Houses, Inns & Hotels . See below for more.

Advertise your B&B, Guest House, Inn or Hotel on Somerset 3d. Click here for details.

If you sign up for the package in the month of January 2010 you will get £5 off the quoted price for your category.

Well, what are you waiting for?

 

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.                                                                   

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon,

honestly

 

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

31st December 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - Three whole pages of pictures of MARTOCK.

Martock is constructed almost entirely of Ham Hill stone. The principal manor of Martock was held before the Conquest by Edith, queen of Edward the Confessor. Seized by the Conquerer in 1066 it was granted soon after to Eustace, Count of Boulogne, from whom it descended to the Fiennes family. Among later lords were the illegitimate son of Henry VIII, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, and from 1603 William, Lord Morley and Monteagle, recipient of the letter which revealed the Gunpowder plot and led to the arrest of Guy Fawkes. All that remains of the manor-house is a small building with a 1659 datestone to the west of the church. The 13th century church of All Saints was where Cromwell and Fairfax and their troops gave thanks in 1645 for the taking of Bridgewater. In the middle of the village, opposite the church, is the 13th and 14th century Treasurer’s House with its medieval hall and kitchen and fine collar braced timber roof.  The house is so called because the vicar of Martock was once Treasurer of Wells Cathedral. It is rated as one of the oldest inhabited houses in the country and is now in the care of the National Trust and can be viewed by appointment with the tenant. Nearer the centre of the village is the Market House which, at one time, housed the fire engine. In front of the Market House is a tall column known as The Pinnacle. The one you see today is a replica, the original being demolished by a lorry.

Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush, The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

Yes I know it's another early update but there is so much going on over the next few days I'd much rather you get the pictures early rather than late. It just leaves me to wish you all a fantastic new years eve and hope 2010 brings you all the luck you deserve, and then some.

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24th December 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STOKE TRISTER and seasonal pictures of DOULTING when it snowed in February this year.

In 1314 Henry de Lorty’s park in Stoke Trister was poached of venison with ‘nets and other engines’, and in 1333 a Wincanton raid on the park, headed by Richard Lovel, took not only deer but also hares, rabbits, partridges and pheasant from the warren. A survey of the manor in 1547 recorded that John Chycke held a plot of land for the rent of one penny, which he was to be excused if at the tenants’ Christmas feast he should ‘leape over the borde (table) and lette farte’! Stoke passed with Cucklington to the Phelips family in 1765 and thereafter was held with Montacute. The manor house dates from  the earlier 15th century and was described in 1547 as ‘a statly house within the parke pale, all covered with tyle which begynnethe to decaye’. The formerly detached kitchen survives behind it. The present church of St Andrew was built in 1841 half a mile north-west from the medieval church, believed to have been destroyed by fire.

Doulting has associations with the remarkably talented St Aldhelm, Saxon Bishop of Sherborne and Abbot of Malmesbury, who was an outstanding scholar, administrator and musician as well as having an attractive personality that people could relate to. It is said that he used to sing and entertain in the market place, and having gathered a following would gradually introduce a religious message to his audience. St Alhelm was taken ill in 709, whilst visiting his rich, pagan uncle, Kenred. Realising he was about to die, and thinking it inappropriate to do so in a heathen house, he instructed his aides to carry him to the little wooden church, where he died on a stone slab. His spirit appeared later that day to his friend Bishop Eigwin of Worcester, instructing that his body be taken to Malmesbury for burial. The carrying out of this post-mortal wish became a seven day pilgrimage across the country, led by a priest carrying a cross followed by monks with lighted tapers, thus creating and imposing ecclesiastical pageant. The present church, which occupies the site of that earlier wooden structure, is an Early English cruciform building with an octagonal tower and spire.

Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

An early update this week as I'm going to be really busy over the next couple of days and would prefer you to have an early update rather than a late one. Thank you for visiting this website and I hope you all have a fabulous Christmas.

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17th December 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WALTON.

Walton is an extremely ancient settlement dating back to Saxon times. Its name means ‘a settlement of British serfs’ or ‘a settlement in a wood’ and is mentioned in the Domesday Book, at one time being part of the land under control of the monks in Glastonbury Abbey. Practically the whole of Walton was bought by Sir John Thynne in the 1530’s. Some 400 years later, on 14th July 1939, a unique event in Somerset history occurred, the day an almost entire village came under the auctioneer’s hammer. Divided into 137 lots, 34 farms and small holdings, 42 houses and cottages and one inn, together sold for the princely sum of £61,665! Source: The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

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10th December 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CANNINGTON.

Somerset County Council’s Farm Institute at Cannington now occupies the site of the 12th century Benedictine nunnery, which was dissolved in 1536 and re-established in 1807. An impressive domed polygonal chapel, built in 1830, now serves as a hall of assembly for today’s college students. The manor has been in the possession of the Clifford family for centuries and the story goes that the ‘Fair Rosamund’ (Rosamund Clifford) was born here and brought up with the young Henry II who fell in love with her and that they secretly married. In the cause of duty Henry was obliged to marry the forcefull Eleanor, ‘by the Wrath of God, Queen’, and the divorced wife of the King of France. Rosamund was installed in a love nest at his palace and all went well until Eleanor spied a silken thread attached to her husband’s spur. Further investigations led to the Fair Rosamund who was promptly packed off to this nunnery for the remainder of her days. On high ground above the village to the north-west is an Iron Age earthwork known as Cynwit’s Castle, scene of one of King alfred’s battles with the Danes in 878. John Pym was born at Brymore House in Cannington and went on to be cited as the ‘founder of party government in England’. In 1962-3 an interesting excavation at Cannington park, former site of an Iron Age Hill Fort, revealed about 400 graves containing perfectly preserved skeletons. The graves had been hewn out of the rock face. The site was thought to be part of a much larger burial ground of as many as 5,000 graves. The area of the burial ground is thought to have been occupied from the Neolithic & Beaker period right through to Medieval times. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

My apologies for the late update this week. The whole internet was down. Well, for me at least. Up and running now though. Have a good weekend.

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3rd December 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PURITON.

Puriton’s name was first believed to be Peritone, mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086. After the Battle of Hastings the manor, held by Edward the Confessor’s queen, was given by William the Conquerer to the Pope, who had blessed his English expedition: the only such papal possession in the country and one which the Pope did not hold for long. For a small village it has a unique past. Its natural deposits provided work until the early 1960’s. Tiles and the famous Bath Bricks were made. Stone was quarried, even salt was mined. When new roads and the M5 were built fascinating archaeological finds came to light. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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26th November 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BAWDRIP.

Bawdrip is situated on the southern side of the Polden Hills, overlooking Sedgemoor. It once had a station on the old Somerset & Dorset Railway line. The village name has been variously listed in ancient documents as Bakatripe (1166), Baketreppe (1201) and Baggetrippe (1243). Trippe meant ‘a trap’ and Bagge is supposed to have related to an animal, a small pig, fox or badger. Inside the 13th century church of St Michael is a defaced effigy of a knight in 14th century plate armour, an oak panel with Tudor carvings and an inscription to the ill-fated heiress Eleanor Lovell. Legend has it that the lady in question, who was a bit of a tease, hid in a chest carved with mistletoe boughs on her wedding day. Unfortunately she became imprisoned there by a spring lock and was suffocated on her wedding day of 14th June 1681. Her father, Edward Lovell, is listed in the names of rectors (1661).

Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

Sorry for the late update. I had everything ready last night. All saved and ready to go. I set my FTP to upload automatically and for my laptop to shut down after. When I arose from my slumber this morning I checked the website only to find that the update had not taken place. When I looked for the updated files to upload again they were nowhere to be seen. I've no idea what happened but the facts are that all the work I did last night vanished. So I've had to wait until I returned from work to re-do it all again and try to upload them again. Pesky gremlins, pah!

 

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19th November 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHEDZOY, and CHIPPING SODBURY, in GLOUCESTERSHIRE, including 3 pages of the VINTAGE & HANDMADE CHRISTMAS FAIR.

‘Cedd’s Island’, or Chedzoy as it is known today, is a small Levels village, mentioned as early as 729 and centred on a three-way junction of lanes to the east of Bridgwater and below the Polden Hills. William Stradling found a Roman villa here, complete with hypocaust, in the early 19th century. Its site has since been lost. The manor was held with the royal estate of North Petherton, passing with it to the Erleghs, who gave the church to Buckland Priory in Durston. By 1212 the manor had been granted to the Montacute family and Simon de Montacute obtained a Tuesday market and three-day fair here in 1314. Dr Walter Ralegh, rector here from 1620, dean of Wells from 1641 and nephew of Sir Walter Ralegh, suffered cruelly during the Civil War. His rectory house was plundered, his family turned out and after imprisonment, he was murdered in 1646. In 1685 much of the activity prior to the Battle of Sedgemoor took place in the parish. The King’s forces camping here, and the then rector, Andrew Paschall, later wrote a detailed account of the campaign. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Originally named Sobburi, Chipping Sodbury owes its existence in the early 12th century to the vision, enterprise and planning ability of one man, William Le Gros. The then Lord of the Manor acquired the territorial rights and titles over a large area of land. He selected a site for a new market town at the point where two ancient track-ways crossed. These routes were much used by travellers and tradesmen as they made their way to Bristol or Droitwich and the Abbey at King’s Wood. The medieval town plan drawn up by William was designed on a unique (for its day) ‘grid’ system. Long narrow burgage plots ran behind the houses, joining up with inter-connecting lanes which provided easy access into the market place. The centre, as it is seen today, varies little from the original design. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

The "Vintage & Handmade Fair ©" is the brainchild of Jayne Soule & Michele Chivers. It is a unique collaboration between a group of Bloggers, crafters & sellers who either make wonderful handmade items or sell gorgeous vintage items. Amongst others you will find handmade dolls, box frames, bags, china, glassware, vintage toys, books, cards, designer children's hats, retro kitsch, fabrics, haberdashery, handmade bunnies, paper creations, cushions, prints, jewellery, trinkets & much, much more.

A bumper update for you this week, over 130 new anaglyphs. Last weekend my wife had arranged for me to take 3d's of the Vintage & Handmade Christmas Fair in Chipping Sodbury. Visitors of my wife's blog (Click here to visit the blog) have had access to the photos since Monday and now they are available to you. The photos of Chipping Sodbury were taken at the time of the previous fair in May of this year. There is a new addition to the MEDIA page with BBC Wiltshire now featuring some of my anaglyphs. My thanks to them.

 

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12th November 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WESTONZOYLAND and two pages worth of BRIANTSPUDDLE in DORSET.

Westonzoyland is the closet village to the site of the last battle on English soil. In 1685 The Duke of Monmouth’s troops were defeated at the fierce and bloody Battle of Sedgemoor. James, Duke of Monmouth, the illegitimate son of Charles II, planned a stealthy advance and surprise attack on the Royalist camp in the early hours of the morning of July 6th. However, the plan went awry when local guides failed to find a way across the final and crucial stretch of water known as the Bussex Rhine. The Royalist camp was alerted, pandemonium broke out and the Rebels found themselves in a weak position on the wrong side of the water. They were defeated during the battle which ensued and their leaders fled from the battlefield. Mythology has it that Monmouth had been warned by a fortune teller to ‘beware the Rhine’, but that he felt comfortably distanced from that river. The battle was followed by a cruel period of retribution, with the notorious Judge Jeffreys meting out his distinctive brand of rough justice, with most of his victims being hanged, drawn and quartered and their earthly remains subjected to further humiliations. The concrete runways to the south-east of the village are remnants from a more recent war. During the Second World War the airfield was extended, concrete runways and buildings were built and British and American aircraft flew from here. In 1943 the Second Tactical Airforce practised with gliders and paratroops for D-Day and in 1944 the USAAF 101st Airborne Division trained here before flying to Normandy. The airfield was finally closed for military purposes in 1958. Peaceful flying continues. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

Briantspuddle is a picturesque village with an abundance of thatched cottages. Even the village hall is thatched. The village has it's own, tiny, Post Office but no church. The village takes its name from Brian de Turberville, Lord of the Manor in the time of Edward III. The suffix comes from the nearby River Puddle. Sources: The Dorset Village Book by Harry Ashley

 

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5th November 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SUTTON MALLET.

Sutton Mallet is a small but pleasant hamlet which, in the 17th century, was known occasionally as Venice Sutton or Venus Sutton. It gained its suffix from the ownership of the Malet family by the 12th century until the 17th. In 1720 the manor was bought by the notorious Robert Knight, cashier of the South Sea Company, who’s ‘bubble’ burst that same year. Knight’s escape to the continent with embezzled funds of the bankrupt company was engineered by his prominent friends and, although his Sutton estate was confiscated, the booty was later brought back by Knight’s son. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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29th October 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WESTON BAMPFYLDE.

Weston Bampfylde lies just to the south of Sparkford and is so named, presumably, because it is west of Cadbury Castle. The suffix reflects the ownership of the manor by the Bampfylde family by 1316 until recent times. The church of the Holy Cross stands at the end of a short lane. It has a west tower with a 13th century base and an octagonal top, and below it are three 15th century bell clappers. The font is Norman and the pulpit Jacobean. On the south wall of the nave there is a memorial to Grace, daughter of Matthew and Ann Lydford and wife to Nathaniel Mist. Little is known of the early life of Nathaniel Mist. He first comes to notice when he set up as a printer in Carter Lane in the City of London in 1715, the year following the succession of George I to the throne of England. In 1716 Mist founded the Weekly Journal supporting the Jacobite cause of the deposed Stuarts. The Jacobites had made a serious attempt in 1715 to place James III on the English throne, but the uprising was swiftly suppressed. However, there was continual plotting against George I, and the Jacobites’ readiness to advance their cause whenever they could, including the use of anti-government propaganda and journals, was a constant source of anxiety to the government. It was into this atmosphere of plot and counterplot that Nathaniel Mist introduced his Jacobite newssheet. It was soon selling 10,000 copies every week. Another figure soon appeared on the scene and became editor of Mist’s Weekly Journal. His name was Daniel Defoe, author of Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders. The mysterious Defoe was also a government secret agent serving both Tory and Whig governments at various times. During the last ten years he had been working as a secret government agent and had spent some time in Scotland operating against the Jacobites. His mission on joining Mist was to gradually neutralise the Journal by softening its Jacobitism and render it harmless without raising the publisher’s suspicions. During this time Mist could not escape attention and he was arrested and put in gaol on several occasions for libels against the government. Each time Defoe would intercede for his employer and either obtain his release or the reduction in severity of the sentence. Mist continued to be a thorn in the side of the government. During his last imprisonment Mist somehow discovered Defoe’s duplicity. On his release, and extremely angry, he went looking for Defoe with murder in mind. When he found him he drew his sword and laid into him. In the fight Mist was wounded and Defoe called a surgeon to dress his opponent’s wounds. Why Defoe called the surgeon is unclear. It could be because of a guilty conscience towards his one time colleague, or perhaps he thought he would be in trouble should Mist die. In 1728, some two years after the death of his wife, Mist’s position had become very dangerous and, by now, he lacked Defoe’s protection. He fled to France where he died nine years later from asthma. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and More Shocking and Suprising Somerset Stories by Jack W. Sweet.

 

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22nd October 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PODIMORE and more photos added on the FROME page.

Podimore is a small lias stone village with a scattering of thatched farmhouses and cottages mingling with more modern constructions. The village was previously known as Milton, meaning ‘the middle settlement’, to which was later added Podimore, or ‘Frog Moor’ (pode = frog), in order to distinguish it from other Somerset Miltons; now it is just Podimore. Evidence of an Iron-Age and Romano-British settlement, occupied until the 4th century, has been found in two fields close to the village. In 966 the manor was granted by King Edgar to the monks of Glastonbury Abbey, who retained it until 1540. Thereafter it was held by the Horners (of ‘Little Jack Horner’ fame) of Mells. The church of St Peter in the centre of the village dates from the early 14th century with an octagonal west tower and several old table tombs to the south of the church. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

This week Jenson Button joins Colin Dredge, Charlie Higson and Richard Vranch (among others) as a famous son of Frome (appropriately pronounced locally as ‘Vroom’). As I’m sure many of you will already know he became Formula 1 World Drivers Champion by finishing 5th in last Sunday’s Brazilian Grand Prix at Interlagos. Now living in Monaco Jenson still visits his town of birth from time to time and pops out for a drink with his friends. The town is currently trying to agree a date with the man to organise a celebration party. I’ll do my best to keep in the know and try to get some 3d’s of the event if I can.

The additional photos of Frome are from a visit I made in August 2007. This was before the Woolly Anaglyph Maker was created and before I upgraded my cameras. So a difference in quality may be experienced compared to recent updates. There were problems with this week's update in that a couple of thumbnails would not load on the Frome page. The full size pictures are there but having issues with my FTP server. It's now past 1.00am so I'll have another look at it this evening.

 

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15th October 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHILTHORNE DOMER.

Chilthorne Domer was a manor of the Earl of Mortain at the time of the Norman Conquest. It derived its name from Sir John do Domer, who married a local girl, a daughter of the Vagg family. The former manor-house has an outside communal toilet with six seat, dated to c.1720. The small church of St Mary was granted to Bruton Priory in 1301. It is mainly 14th century in origin with a 15th century font and western bellcot. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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8th October 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED -Two pages worth of NORTH CADBURY.

North Cadbury is separated from South Cadbury by the River Cam and the busy A303. To the west is the old route linking South Cadbury with Glastonbury, known as ‘King Arthur’s Hunting Causeway’. The splendid church beside the gabled Tudor manor house is considered by many to be the finest complete Perpendicular church in Somerset. The ancient Catash Hundred Courts, Danish in origin, were held locally and the village pub is named after this historic fact. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

So, here we are in October again which means that the website is 4 years old this month. Once again visitor figures have gone up from last year, so a big THANK YOU to all of you for visiting this website. I hope you continue to enjoy the photos as I continue on my quest to visit and record all the towns and villages in this wonderful county in 3d.

 

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1st October 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED -Two pages worth of MARSTON MAGNA.

Marston Magna (meaning ‘larger settlement by a marsh’) is sited on a double bend on the A359. It was so called to distinguish it from Little Marston Farm (west from the village) or Marston Prava. Held as nine separate estates before the Norman Conquest by the early 18th century the manor was owned by Sir John St Barbe and descended with the village of Ashington to the Sydenham family. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

This week's update had to be split into two pages. One reason was to ensure the page loaded reasonably quickly and the other was to ensure the viewer (You) had a break. To view all 42 anaglyphs one after the other could make some of you feel slightly heady, so I thought I'd play safe.

 

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24th September 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMBE FLOREY and TOUR OF BRITAIN 2009 STAGE 6 - BIDEFORD in DEVON.

Combe Florey derived its name from the Florey family, ancient lords of the manor. Described by Edward Hutton as probably the loveliest village he had ever seen, it is a place of enchantment in an area which has traditionally been an inspiration to poets and writers. Combe Florey was the home of wit, eccentric and unconventional cleric Sydney Smith. Originally a lover of city life he regarded the countryside as ‘a kind of health grave,. However, he soon changed his mind and declared that he was ‘extremely pleased with Combe Florey’ and pronounced it to be a very pretty place in a very beautiful county. He continued to live in the village even after becoming canon of St Paul’s Cathedral in London. He liked to delight, surprise and shock people and was a great practical joker. To fool his sophisticated London friends into believing how mild the climate was down in Somerset he tied oranges onto the shrubs in the garden. Once someone had suggested that the sight of deer was add a touch of distinction to the rectory he fixed antlers to his rather bemused pet donkeys. Sydney Smith had a spontaneous, witty epithet for every occasion which broke the ice and melted barriers away. At first the villagers were somewhat bemused with this cheerful extrovert but he very soon won their confidence and endeared himself to everyone, taking on unofficial roles as doctor, counselor and magistrate, and living out his philosophy to ‘Do good and be happy’. This lovable, unconventional vicar is commemorated in the east window of the village church. The stone effigies lying in the north aisle of the church are thought to be of Sir John de Meriet and his two wives, Mary who died aged 18 and his second wife Elizabeth, who died in 1344. The village was also home to Evelyn Waugh, who lived here from 1956 until his death in 1966. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

Following on from last weeks Tour of Britain entry for Frome this week is the turn of Bideford in Devon. As you should know by now Stage 6 started in Frome Somerset and ended in Bideford in Devon. My initial aim was to capture a hill stage between the two but bike beat car to the hills. So on the Bideford I travelled and, once there, I had about 25 minutes to find somewhere to park and then find my way to the finish line and try to find a decent vantage point. The place was packed. I managed to obtain a position on the finish straight but not really in a suitable spot to record the riders crossing the line. The photos I did take have a blurry background as I was panning to keep the cyclist as sharp as I could. Be warned that this can be a strain on the eyes when viewing in 3d. If there is a stage in Somerset for next years Tour of Britain then I think I'll hire a motorbike taxi to enable me to get from venue to venue quicker. I hope you enjoy he pictures.

 

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17th September 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - GALHAMPTON and TOUR OF BRITAIN 2009 STAGE 6 - FROME.

In Galhampton on 25th October 1809 local volunteers had arranged to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of King George III.The volunteers, commanded by Colonel Woodforde, had placed a battery of cannon near Galhampton House in order to fire salutes to the monarch on entering the 50th year of his reign. The volunteers were not to be denied the public rejoicings, and were attending a public dinner in Castle Cary, together with other festivities in the town. Captain John Burge had been given responsibility for the care of the battery, and had left Thomas Millard, a member of his company, together with another volunteer, in charge of the guns. No officer or NCO was left to supervise the two volunteers, and it would seem that they got bored, and idle fingers can make mischief. Thomas Millard decided to light the touch-hole of one of the cannon as a jolly jape. However, the gun did not fire, and so Millard took a ramrod and standing in front of the muzzle, thrust it down the barrel whilst the touch-hole was still smouldering. The result was a foregone conclusion because the cannon immediately discharged and the unfortunate but foolish Thomas Millard was blown to pieces. His remains were collected up and he was buried in the parish churchyard on 29th October 1809. He was 24 years old. Source: More Shocking and Surprising Somerset Stories by Jack W. Sweet.

Many of you will be aware that the Tour of Britain cycle race enters Somerset today (17th). Starting in Frome the cyclist meander across the county before departing and finishing in Bideford in Devon. I'll be out and about in Frome in the morning to see the start and then, traffic allowing, I shall be in the Enmore area to cover the hill climb and then, hopefully, will be off to Bideford to capture the end of Stage 6. So, if you see someone taking photos of the event with two cameras, that will be me. Please say hello. Providing all goes well the results will appear on this website next week! (Or sooner).

UPDATE - I have been working into the small hours of Friday morning in order to bring you the TOUR of BRITAIN update. The initial plan was to capture the start and then rush off to record one of the King of the Mountain stages further on into the county. Alas, in the race of bike and car the bike won by about 5 minutes. With no realistic chance of being able to get across the county to catch them in another part of Somerset I decided to play safe and head to Bideford to capture the end of the stage. Bideford will be featured next week. Whilst at Frome I had a chat with BBC Somerset radio and they did appear interested with what I'm doing, so listen out next week as I could be on air at some point!

 

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10th September 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMPTON PAUNCEFOOT.

Compton Pauncefoot is regarded as one of the gems of east Somerset. Located near to Cadbury Castle, in land of Arthurian legend, it is framed on all sides by the gently rounded hills. The buildings are constructed of golden, greenish grey stone. The unusual crescent of three storey buildings with latticed windows served as dwellings for local workers. A prehistoric triangular enclosure, called Sigwells Camp, has now been ploughed out in the south of the parish and flint tools have been found there. Excavations for a reservoir on Hicknoll Slait in 1966 revealed four graves with a Saxon spearhead and a 7th century shield boss. The manor was held by the Pauncefoot family (the surname being a Norman nickname meaning ‘round belly’) from the 12th to the 16th century. Their descendants, the Keynes family, formed a small Roman Catholic enclave here in the early 17th century, from whom sprung three prominent Jesuits. The church of St Andrew stands at the north-western end of the village beside a three-cornered village green, the Georgian rectory (featured in the TV version of Jane Austen’s Mansfield park) and the 18th century Manor House. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Book of Somerset villages by Sheila Bird.

 

Those of us based in the UK will be able to see some 3d on TV this coming Autumn. Channel 4 is to show previously unseen footage of Queen Elizabeth shot in 3-D during her coronation year. Program makers said The Queen in 3-D would transport viewers back in time to 1953 and would feel like the monarch was "walking right past you". The two hour-long shows will tell the story of two men, now in their 80s, who filmed the 3-D newsreel. Special glasses needed to view them will be given out free in Sainsbury's stores before they air later this year. The original 3-D color newsreel, Royal Review, filmed by director Bob Angell and cameraman Arthur Wooster, followed the Queen before and after her coronation. The Channel 4 series will also include footage of the Queen at the Epsom Derby and on a boat trip on the River Thames. David Glover, commissioning editor for The Queen in 3-D, said: "When I was told that there was unseen footage of the Queen's coronation in 3-D I didn't really believe it at first. You watch as the crowds wave at the coronation and you see the young Queen Elizabeth walking right past you. Commissioning editor David Glover said, "Watching it didn't disappoint. It was like turning the TV set into a window - you draw back the curtains and look straight back into 1953. Watching period 3-D documentary footage is about as close to time travel as one can get." The programs will be shown in ColorCode 3-D, which looks almost like an ordinary image when viewed without the glasses, which have an amber and a dark blue lens. It does not need to be viewed on a 3-D-ready television. The Queen in 3-D is part of Channel 4's planned week of programming to celebrate the "golden era" of 3-D footage. The week will also feature the hour-long Derren Brown's 3-D Magic Spectacular, which will see Brown "play host to some of the world's greatest, funniest and most shocking magicians". The compilation show The Greatest Ever 3-D Moments will also be shown. Just to make it clear, the 3d glasses you use to view this website will NOT WORK for the 3d TV transmissions. You will need to obtain a pair of amber and dark blue glasses from Sainsburys. If you are a bit of a 3d nut (Like myself) then the glasses you used to see 'Chuck' in 3d, recently shown on Virgin 1, will be fine.

 

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3rd September 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHILTON CANTELO.

In the churchyard at Chilton Cantelo lie the headless remains of Theophilous Broome, who died in 1670. As a staunch Parliamentarian during the Civil War, this Warwickshire man felt that Somerset was a pleasant place for retirement, but feared that retribution might catch up with him in death by the placing of his head upon a spike. So, to prevent any possibility of this he instructed his sister to bury his body but to keep his head in a safe place. She duly carried out these wishes and kept his head safely in an oak cupboard at Higher Farm. Subsequent attempts to reunite his head with his body or to disturb it in any way have reportedly been met with heartrending cries from the skull and bad luck for the occupants of the house. Source: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

 

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27th August 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SHARPSTONE.

Sharpstone was recognised as having special architectural and historic interest and was designated as a Conservation Area in November 1975. It has long been associated with the fulling and cloth trade, first as a cottage industry and then as a prosperous manufacturing centre. The hamlet expanded mainly in the 19th century to house the growing number of mill workers. Changes in technology and the industrial revolution affected the way in which cloth was manufactured; machines replaced workers, and the industry finally died out towards the end of the 19th century. With the collapse of the wool trade, the mill site was subsequently used as a manufactory of rubber components for the automotive industry. The factory closed in the 1990s. Sharpstone is considerably smaller than its close neighbour Freshford and largely linear, built along just two narrow lanes. Sharpstone Lane leads across the hillside through the hamlet, meeting Rosemary Lane which climbs up the steep slope from Freshford Mill. The two settlements are separated by a stretch of land called The Tyning, a medieval word denoting an area of enclosed land. This is valuable both as a village green, and as a ‘no-mans land’ between the two settlements, preventing them from merging through infill development. Sharpstone in particular enjoys fabulous views to the east, as the land drops away across the valley floor into the Wiltshire countryside. A distant view of the 18th century country house The Hall is also visible on the hillside opposite. The most prominent house in the hamlet is The Hermitage, a substantial hall house of 15th century origin, although much altered. Its supreme position on the hillside above the sweeping valley below is emphasised by the raised pathway of rock-faced stone which zigzags up to the entrance. The landscaped gardens have an open aspect and are entirely to the front of the building, allowing the passerby to appreciate the fine building within its setting and the resident to fully enjoy the spectacular views. The bulk of Sharpstone is made up of charming, mostly 19th century former mill workers’ cottages built of local stone. These climb up the steep hillside with an artless charm and as groups are integral to the character of the area. High ‘weaver’s windows’ are a charming local detail found in many of the former workers cottages. Abbotsleigh and its associated cottage and coach house form a group at the junction of Sharpstone Lane and Rosemary Lane at one end of the village while Sharpstone House enjoys a prominent position at the other end of the lane. These 19th century houses are built in a restrained Victorian style while Church House and Sharpstone Cottage exhibit the early 19th century fashion for gothic details. Source: The internet .

 

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20th August 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BRATTON SEYMOUR.

The crossroads at Bratton Seymour bear the name ‘Jack White’s Gibbet’. So the story goes a traveller staying at an inn at Castle Cary was robbed and murdered, Jack White being the principal suspect because he was reluctant to submit to the ‘trial by touch’ ordeal. Other suspects who agreed to the test by touching the corpse met with no reaction, but when Jack White finally agreed to do so a slight trickle of blood issued from the corpse’s mouth. Jack was promptly arrested. Further investigations at Jack’s place of work revealed a hoard of Spanish coins and the murdered man’s bible. The victim being none other than Jack’s brother William, who had gone to sea to seek his fortune some years previously. In 1729 the murderer was suspended from the gibbet at the crossroads which still bear his name. Source: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

 

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13th August 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CLAVERTON.

In the Middle Ages Claverton belonged to the Bishops of Bath & Wells. The old manor house by the church, the site of the Bishop’s home, have now gone leaving behind a series of impressive terraces with fine stonework, presumably the work of one of the Bassett family. There is a monument to William Bassett in the church. In the churchyard stands the mausoleum of Ralph Allen. Further up the hill is the newer manor house, built by Sir Jeffry Wyatville in 1819-20, who also renovated Windsor Castle for George IV. It is famous, however, not for its architecture but for two other reasons. Here, on 26th July 1897, Winston Churchill made his first political speech. And here on 1st July 1961 was opened ‘the only comprehensive museum of Americana in Europe’. Source: Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning.

 

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6th August 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - UPPER SWAINSWICK.

The valley below Swainswick was the scene of one of the most bloodiest of battles during the English Civil War, the Battle of Lansdown. Royalist troops from Cornwall with Sir Bevil Grenville at their head were moving along the valley from the Swainswick one July afternoon in 1643. They wore no armour but the sun must have glinted on a horses’ harness or on the pikes that the foot soldiers carried. Suddenly they were attacked by Cromwell’s troops, pounding down from the hill above. Those watching from the village may have seen Sir Bevil Grenville fall, but his 16 year-old son was helped into the empty saddle, and they followed the lad up the hill to victory on top of Lansdown. Cromwell’s troops were crushed Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

We are on holiday in Devon this week, hence the early update, so big thanks to Brian and Sarah for their help in securing me an internet connection in time for this weeks update. There will be anaglyphs of where we stayed sometime over the next couple of weeks.

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30th July 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BATHEASTON.

Batheaston is just a couple of mile east of the Georgian city of Bath, which is where the name is believed to have derived from. The village is on the north bank of the River Avon and at the foot of Solsbury Hill. The hill is situated within the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and was an Iron Age hill fort when occupied between 300 and 100 BC. Until 1995 the Roman Fosse Way ran through the village and became, in turn, one of the first turnpike roads in England. The 12th century church (remodelled in the 15th century) is the oldest structure in the village with all other building dating from the 16th century and onwards. From at least the 17th century to about 1820 Batheaston was part of the village based woollen textile industry of South West England, which was organised on an outworking basis controlled by gentlemen clothiers. The first woollen textile factory was built around 1799 and the owner was very quickly the recipient of a threatening letter from out of work hand cloth workers. By 1823 the woollen industry in the village was in terminal decline and the factory was converted to silk production until this came to an end in 1840.  There is now no trace of the factory left. Sources: Batheaston Historic Buildings Survey by The Batheaston Society and Wikipedia.

This week's bumper update now means this website has more than 4,000 anaglyphs available to view. For those of you missing the Speakin Zummerzet feature please be aware that it will return in the new year. There are some exciting developments going on with this feature so please be patient. The wait will be worth it.

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23rd July 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - EASTON.

Easton is situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty and is close to the city of Wells, England’s smallest cathedral city. The name of the village is believed to mean ’The enclosure by the water’ from the Old English eas and tun. Its church of St Paul was built by Richard Carver and dates from 1843. It is a Grade II listed building. The village is in the civil parish of St Cuthbert Out. The parish entirely surrounds, but does not include the city and parish of Wells. The parish is named for the church of St Cuthbert and was created in 1866 when the parish was split in two. As you will see in the pictures there appears to be an abundance of water pumps for such a small village, leading one to assume that there was a water supply problem here once. However, despite much research I can find nothing to suggest this is the case.

There are plaques at each pump. One of them states;

‘Only those people who have been short of water know the value of it’ by the Easton Postmaster Frank Gough 1928.

On another there is the following rhyme;

‘That vital problem, Easton water, Now is settled as it oughter, The village haven’t got the hump, Since they’ve had a nice new pump’. By F.G. Clements 1928.

So clearly something was going on here in the late 1920’s.  If there is anyone who can enlighten me please get in touch and tell me more. Source: The internet.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. No updates now until January 2010   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
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Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
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Coming soon

 

 

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16th July 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMPTON MARTIN.

Compton Martin lies on the north side of the Mendip Hills. Its name derives from 1066 when the manor of Contone or Compton was given by William the Conqueror to Serlo de Berci, one of his followers. It passed soon after to a Norman family named Martin who gave the village the latter half of its name. The centre of the village is dominated by the 12th century church of St Michael, famous for its Norman chancel, nave, north porch and side aisles. The village is also the home of Cliff Quarry where local resident Clifford Slater gathered his unique collection of rare fossils which is now housed in the headquarters of the British Geological Survey at Keyworth in Nottinghamshire. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon

 

 

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9th July 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WOOLLEY.

The church at Woolley has the distinction of being re-built by Wood the Younger.  John Wood (1728-1782) the Younger was an English architect who worked mostly in the city of Bath. He began his work as an assistant to his father, the architect John Wood the Elder. Among his works that can still be seen are the Royal Crescent and Circus which were built to his father’s designs, Bath Assembly Rooms and Buckland House in Buckland, Oxfordshire. As with last weeks entry Woolley is also a ‘Thankful Village’. A phrase coined by Arthur Mee in the 1930’s to distinguish those villages that were fortunate to have lost no soldiers during World War One. Somerset apperas to have the highest number of these villages in England. Source: Wikipedia.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link as shown. This will be the last Speakin Zummerzet entry for this year.

Please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon

 

 

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2nd July 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - RODNEY STOKE.

Rodney Stoke was originally just called Stoke. It then acquired the suffix of Giffard when it came into possession of the Giffard family at the time of King John. It eventually passed by marriage into the Rodney family when Richard de Rodney wed Maud Giffard circa 1300. The church of St Leonard has numerous monuments to the Rodney family. His son, Sir Walter, who succeeded him, owned many manors in Somerset. He was a man of great importance and held office as Sheriff of both Somerset and Dorset. Unfortunately the manor no longer exists and there is only a small part of the porter’s lodge still standing, now used as a barn. All the old houses here are built of the local Draycott stone. Unique to its source the stone was used in very early times and was used for the front of Temple Meads railway station in Bristol. When polished the stone was called Draycott marble with the largest peice now residing in Longleat House. Rodney Stoke is also a ‘Thankful Village’. Sources: The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

As I mentioned last week I have increased the size of the gallery pictures slightly on new entries. When viewing them I would recommend you press F11 on your keyboard to get a better viewing experience. All you have to do is press F11 when done to return the screen to its usual format.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link as shown and please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon

 

 

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24th June 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - IFORD.

Iford stands in a tranquil area by the river Frome. The settlement straddles the Somerset Wiltshire boundary with the majority in Somerset. Iford House stands here and was once owned by salter and mill owner William Chanler, who hailed from Bradford-on-Avon. It was he who added the classical front to the building around 1730. Earlier parts of the property possibly date from 1500 with extensions during the reign of Elizabeth 1 (1533-1603). The Manor was in a dilapidated state when bought by Harold Peto in 1899. Peto was an architectural partner to Sir Ernest George and Sir Edwin Lutyens who became more and more interested in garden design and was responsible for many in this country and abroad. The county boundary actually runs through the house, parallel with the classical front and goes on to bisect the out-door fish pond. Sources: The Wiltshire Village Book by Michael Marshman.

Part of the process in creating a village page is to scrutinize all the photos I'd taken and select only the best, usually about 15-20 pictures. This week I found it difficult to omit any and so decided to select the whole lot. I've also decided to slightly increase the size of the gallery pictures from now on, to enhance your enjoyment.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link as shown and please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon

 

 

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17th June 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SAMPFORD ARUNDEL.

The name Sampford Arundel comes from Sandy-ford, a crossing over the little waterway, and from Roger Arundel, who was given the manor after the Norman Conquest. In 1225 Nicholas Arundel was pursued by his tenants here, denied sanctuary by the church and murdered. The body was then placed in the manor- house which they then set on fire, presumably to destroy the evidence. The corpse was carried off by the prior of Canonsleigh (Devon) and at least 14 of the tenants were later hanged. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The book of Somerset villages by Sheila Bird.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link as shown and please have a look around the rest of the site by clicking any of the links that interest you from the menu below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.   Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.   Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.   Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.
FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   3D GIFFS   MY PROFILE
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.  
See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.
  If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.  

Coming soon

 

 

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10th June 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LANGRIDGE.

Langridge is a small agricultural village situated beneath Lansdown Hill, on which stands a monument to Sir Bevil Granville who was killed in the battle that was fought here in 1643. The church dedicated to St Mary Magdalene dates from the 12th century and has been designated Grade 1 listed status by English Heritage. Sources: Wikipedia and the Internet.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE   3D GIFFS
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.  
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.

 

 

Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

  Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.  

If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.

 

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4th June 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PRIDDY.

At 800feet above sea level Priddy is the highest village in Somerset, and one of the highest in England. Its name derived from the Celtic for ‘Earth’. Throughout its history the village was held with and under the manor of Wesbury-sub-Mendip by successive bishops of Bath and Wells. It formed one of the four principle centres of lead mining and smelting on the Mendips Hills until St Cuthbert’s mine finally closed in 1908. Priddy Fair, formerly held on the green on St Lawrence’s day, was altered to 21st August when the calendar was changed in 1752 and still continues on the nearest Wednesday of that date. Now mainly for sheep (together with a funfair) it specialised in cloth when it was first mentioned in 1349. The King’s alnager of cloth was beaten up there and his warrant and purse stolen in 1350. There is no evidence to support the claim that the fair was moved from the city of Wells because of the Black Death. It is also popularly believed that the fair cannot continue if the picturesque stack of hurdles is not maintained on the green, although there is no legal basis for this fear. A local legend has it that a rich metal merchant called Joseph of Arimathea, whose trade brought him to the port of Watchet, walked the Quantock Hills to Bridgwater. On this occasion the young Jesus is said to have accompanied him and on their way they passed through the lanes to Priddy where he talked to the miners. The story is so deep-rooted that a local saying, used to back up a point being made, went ‘and that’s as sure as Christ came to Priddy’.  Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The book of Somerset villages by Sheila Bird.

I have added another page featuring my favourite anaglyphs from the Somerset gallery so far. Check it out by clicking here and why not email me to tell me your favourites.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

                                                                            

MY FAVOURITES   FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE   3D GIFFS
See my choice from the Somerset Gallery, along with notes about each anaglyph featured.  
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.

 

 

Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

  Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.  

If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.

 

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28th May 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WELLINGTON and ROCKWELL GREEN.

The name Wellington, formerly Weolingtun, possibly means ‘the settlement of the people near the [Pagan] temple clearing’, and may suggest that the rise on which the parish church stands was an early sacred site. The place was first mentioned in an undated charter of 899 to 909, by which King Edward the elder of the West Saxons gave the manor to Bishop Asser of Shereborne, biographer of his father, King Alfred. Like most Somerset towns Wellington produced cloth in the Middle Ages. There was a fulling mill, probably on the river Tone, in 1503 and a cloth house near the market place by 1548. From Devon in the 1730’s came a Quaker family, the Weres, to found a cloth making business which was to dominate the town’s economy for over two centuries. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Rockwell Green is a former hamlet to the west of Wellington. Formerly known as Rowe Green tis present name was adopted circa 1780 and presumably refers to the brick well at the core of the village. The church of All Saints was put up in 1888 to the designs of J. Spencer. The tower and spire were added in 1908. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Another entry is on the Speakin Zummerzet page to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

                                                                            

FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE   3D GIFFS
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.

 

 

Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

  Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.  

If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.

 

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21st May 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BROADWAY.

Broadway is strung out along a single street. Its name is supposed to derive from the ‘broad way’ which formerly led to the medieval Neroche Forest. The Almshouses were founded after litigation over Alexander Every’s will of 1588. The church of St Aldhelm and St Eadburga is situated away from the village, local tradition ascribing its isolation to an outbreak of plague. An 1891 memorial set up in the south transept commemorates Humphrey Pinney, early emigrant to America, who though born in Hardington Mandeville was living in Broadway when he emigrated in 1635: probably persuaded by the Rev Joseph Hull, curate here from 1633, who sailed with him. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page is available to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

                                                                            

FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE   3D GIFFS
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.

 

 

Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

  Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.  

If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.

 

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14th May 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - EMBOROUGH.

Emborough, meaning ‘smooth hill, recorded in the Domesday Book as Amelberge, is a collection of farms, small houses and a church. Emborough pond, formerly known as Lachemere pool, is a feature used well by anglers. The lake was also popular for winter skating with the boys from Downside Abbey. The church is no longer in use and stands as a memorial for past times. I have a family history connection with Emborough Pond. My Grandfather, Roy Lancelot Woollard, once attempted to rescue a bather who had gotten into difficulty in the pond. The report in the local newspaper states that he was dressing after a swim when he heard calls for help. He was first directed to a spot where he entered the water but was unable to find anything. Later someone directed him to another place where he eventually found the deceased lying face down at the bottom of the lake. With help he pulled him from the water and attempted artificial respiration, to no avail. He was commended for his efforts. This event would have taken place in the 1920’s or 30’s. Unfortunately the newspaper clipping we have of the event does not have a date to it.  Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

This weeks entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page is available to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

                                                                            

FRANK MATTHYS   MEDIA   SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET   W.A.M.   BOOK STORE   3D GIFFS
Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to. Updated weekly.

 

 

Download probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

  Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.  

If you don't have any 3d glasses or have problems viewing anaglyphs have a look at the 3d giffs instead. Updated irregularly.

 

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7th May 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ILTON.

Ilton was under ownership of Athelney Abbey from Saxon times until its dissolution. South of the village stands a nine-cell range of almshouses founded in 1634 by John Whetstone. To the east of the village a square moated site is all that remains to mark the site of the medieval Merryfield (13th century ‘Muryfield’, meaning pleasant field), held by John of Ilminster in the 13th century. A later owner, John Wyndham , is thought to have demolished it and used the materials to build Woodhouse Farm, dated 1634, at the north of the village. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

As mentioned last week TOTAL FILM magazine has a major 3d special in their latest edition (after clicking the link play the video). There are articles on the history and the future of 3d films along with plenty of anaglyphs to view. A lot of the adverts are in 3d too. It's also a good way to get a pair of 3d glasses. So don't delay, pop out and get your copy now!

This weeks entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page is available to read by clicking on the link below and another photo has been added to the GIFFS page.

 

FRANK MATTHYS                  MEDIA                  SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET                  W.A.M.                  BOOK STORE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to.

 

Download the probably the best FREE anaglyph software on the net.

 

Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

30th April 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BINEGAR.

The name Binegar apparently means ‘the slope where beans are grown’ and was listed as Begenhangra in a charter of 1065. Calamine ore, for the production of zinc, was mined here but the village is better known for its limestone quarries. Many of the 19th century houses were built to accommodate the quarrymen. Much of the stone was moved by rail via the Somerset and Dorset line. This was closed in 1966. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

It appears that I have deleted the entry for Weare, dated 16th April. Unfortunately I don't have a back-up of the information on the village that was posted at the time. My apologies to the people of Weare. If anyone out there can send me a copy of that weeks post I would be eternally grateful.

I have been working on creating some giff images to give the 3d effect for those who have problems with annaglyphs or those who don't own any 3d glasses. Not all of the anaglyphs I create work as a 3d giff but, nonetheless, some do. It's a time consuming job to go through my extensive library to try them out but, from time to time, I will be adding to the small selection I can offer you for now. Please click here to go to the 3D GIFFS page.

A bit of 3d news now. If you're keen on 3d and enjoy the Terminator films then Total Film magazine is a must buy. The current issue contains a special 3D section that features all the 3D blockbusters soon to be at your local cinema and some 3D photos too. Glasses are included in the package so if you need a pair of 3D glasses to make this site more enjoyable then this month's magazine is for you.

Another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page is available to read and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS                  MEDIA                  SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET                  W.A.M.                  BOOK STORE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering books from Frank.
  See what the media and other websites are saying about Somerset3d.  

Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to.

 

Download the best anaglyph software on the net. Probably

 

Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

23rd April 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ISLE BREWERS.

The name Isle Brewers comes from the village being situated on the River Isle and from being the early estate of the Briwere family in the 13th century. The present day church was built in 1861. Designed by C.E. Giles and paid for by its eccentric vicar (1845-1862), Dr Joseph Wolff. Born the son of a German Jewish rabbi he converted to Catholicism, taught Hebrew to the future Pope Pius IX and became self-appointed missionary to the Middle East. Kidnapped and sold into slavery, he walked 600 miles naked before escaping. Later, in America, he preached to Congress, converted to and was ordained into the Anglican church and married the daughter of the Earl of Orford. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

A reminder if you are intending to purchase a 3d book fom Frank Matthys (See link below), please don't forget to mention Somerset3d when ordering.

As usual I have placed another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can see and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS                  MEDIA                  SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET                  W.A.M.                  BOOK STORE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
  See what the media are saying about this website.  
Learn about the old Zummerzet language. Includes audio examples to listen to.
 

Download the best anaglyph software on the net. Probably

 

Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

9th April 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WEST BRADLEY.

West Bradley is a small scattered village south-east of Glastonbury. Meaning ‘broad clearing, or wood’ with the prefix ‘west’ being a more modern addition.  The prefix is a bit of a mystery as there is no East or South Bradley, but there is a North Bradley, in Wiltshire. The manor was given to Glastonbury Abbey in 746 by Ethelbald, King of Mercia. One of its later owners was Dr Claver Morris, the celebrated physician of Wells who died in 1726. Source:Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

I have entered a new link on the HOME page to enable you to visit my FLICKR photostream. Please pop along and tell me what you think of the photos.

There is yet another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can see and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
See what the media are saying about this website.
Learn about the old Zummerzet language.

Download the best anaglyph software on the net. Probably

Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

2nd April 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HORTON.

The countryside around Horton, and its close neighbour Broadway, came within the boundary of the Royal Forest of Neroche. By Tudor times cultivation of the forest and common land had begun and farmhouses were built, several of which still stand today. The village grew around a scattering of dwellings which were erected as the common land was gradually cleared in the area remembered as Broadway Hill. The church of St Peter was consecrated in 1900 and continued the work of the old Mission room. The Wesleyan Chapel was built in 1833 and the school in 1877. Source: The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

There is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can see and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
See what the media are saying about this website.
Learn about the old Zummerzet language.

Download the best anaglyph software on the net. Probably

Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

 

HOME GALLERY 1 GALLERY 2 TOP OF PAGE

 

 

26th March 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHILCOMPTON.

Chilcompton was known in the Domesday Book as Continua. Its present name is said to have derived from the old words 'ceald (cold), 'combe' (valley) and 'ton' (village). There are several old houses in the village. Gainsborough House is rumoured to have belonged to the artist Gainsborough when he was working in Bath. Chilcompton was also the home to my Uncle Mike (Featured more than once on Speakin Zummerzet) and I have good memories of visiting him and hearing him tell his old jokes and show off his garden. Sources: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

There is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can see and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

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19th March 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BADGWORTH. Apologies for the late update. We have had no internet connection for the last two days.

Before 1066 Badgworth was held by two thegns, whose holdings may represent the later manors of Nether Badgworth and Over or West Badgworth. The two manors were united 20 years later by Walter de Douai. The parish church is uniquely dedicated to St Congar (Whose name is also linked to Congresbury), a Welsh missionary, who is thought to have founded the first church on the site. The present building is mainly 14th century in date and can possibly be attributed to John de Hamtone (or Hanton). Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Last Friday was my birthday and Mrs 3d and I had a day out in Bristol. For me it was a chance to complete my surround sound system, using my birthday money, with the purchase of a woofer from a well known retailer in Whiteladies Road, and for Mrs 3d the chance to explore the area for shops relating to her new business venture she is currently planning. For more details of this and some photos of our day out (and one of me when a baby) please click here.

There is yet another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can see and hear by clicking on the link below.

 

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Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
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12th March 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - GURNEY SLADE.

The hamlet of Gurney Slade straddles the A37 and is set in an area of the Mendips that has been mined for coal and lead and quarried for its limestone for 100's of years. In the 17th century there was considerable lead mining activity in this area with the iron ore being carted to smelting works in the valleys. This died out over a century ago. Licences to mine had to be obtained from the 'Lord Royal', and miners staked their claims in traditional style and started digging their 'grooves' or 'gruffs'. Today hummocky, excavated ground on the Mendip plateau is still referred to as 'gruffy' ground. Source: The book of Somerset villages by Sheila Bird.

There is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page that you can go to by clicking the link below.

 

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5th March 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STONE ALLERTON.

Stone Allerton was originally a Saxon manor and was added to Chapel Allerton around the time of the Domesday Book. Like its neighbour it is historically a farming community. A walk around the hamlet will enable one to enjoy plenty of fresh country air and views across towards the Somerset Levels. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

The Speakin Zummerzet page has yet another entry, please click the link below to visit. The Big Picture item hasn't really taken off and so will not be featuring from now on.

 

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26th February 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - EAST PENNARD.

The estate in East Pennard was granted by King Edred to Aelfgyth, a nun of Wilton in Wiltshire, and she in turn transferred it to Glastonbury Abbey, which retained it until the Dissolution in 1539. Ten years later the manor was granted to William Paulet, later Marquess of Winchester, eventually passing in 1797 to his decendants, the Napiers of Tintinhull. Pennard House, with its own park, is a Jacobean manor-house to the north of the village, which Gerald Napier remodelled in 1815. Source: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

The Speakin Zummerzet page has another entry and now includes audio so you can hear what the words should sound like. The files can be heard via Windows Media Player and I hope to be able to provide the option of listening via other file types in the non too distant future. The Big Picture is still there for you to download. Please click on links below to visit.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

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A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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19th February 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COCKLAKE and the last entry for SALISBURY in WILTSHIRE is now online.

There isn't much to see in Cocklake apart from farms. Just a few miles away from Wedmore it is a small hamlet of a place and is an ideal location to be used as a base to explore the area around Cheddar Gorge or, indeed, to wander off into the Somerset Levels. There are plenty of small places like this within the county.

Salisbury was an important centre for music in the 18th century. The grammarian James Harris, a friend of Handel, directed concerts at the Assembly Rooms for almost 50 years up to his death in 1780, with many of the most famous musicians and singers of the day performing there. Salisbury holds an annual St George's Day pageant, the origins of which are claimed to go back to the thirteenth century. Salisbury has a strong artistic community, with galleries situated in the city centre, including one in the public library. In the 18th century, John Constable made a number of celebrated landscape paintings featuring the cathedral spire and the surrounding countryside. Salisbury's annual International Arts Festival, started in 1973, and held in late May to early June, provides a programme of theatre, live music, dance, public sculpture, street performance and art exhibitions. Some buildings in Salisbury are reputed to be haunted. Ghost tours are popular with locals and visitors. One such building is the local Odeon cinema located in the House of John Halle. It is the oldest building in the UK to contain a cinema. Former Prime Minister Edward Heath lived and died in Salisbury. He lived in the Cathedral Close. His funeral took place in the cathedral and was attended by many respected political figures. Other well known people who have or still do live in Salisbury include former Iron Maiden vocalist Paul Di’Anno, actor Anthony Daniels who is better known as C-3PO from the Star Wars films, actor Ralph Nathaniel Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, England rugby international Richard Hill and comedian David Mitchell. Source: Wikipedia.

There is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page and The Big Picture is there for you to download. Please click on links below to visit.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
See what the media are saying about this website.
Learn about the old Zummerzet language.

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Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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12th February 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - DRAYCOTT and the penultimate page for SALISBURY in WILTSHIRE.

Draycott is best known for it's strawberries and for the quarrying of a local golden stone, Draycott marble, which takes a polished finish. The now-disused railway line that ran through the village was called the Strawberry Line. It was built as a railway line in 1869 to carry strawberries from Cheddar. The line closed in the 1960s. Parts of the line are now part of the National Cycle Network. Source: Somerset, The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Wikipedia.

In May of 1289, there was uncertainty about the future of Margaret, Maid of Norway, and her father sent ambassadors to Edward I of England. Edward met Robert the Bruce and others at Salisbury in October 1289, which resulted in the Treaty of Salisbury, under which Margaret would be sent to Scotland before 1 November 1290 and any agreement on her future marriage would be delayed until she was in Scotland. In 1483, a large-scale rebellion against Richard III of England broke out, led by his own 'kingmaker', Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham. After the revolt collapsed, Buckingham was executed at Salisbury, near the Bull's Head Inn. At the time of the Glorious Revolution, King James II gathered his main forces, altogether about 19,000 men, at Salisbury, James himself arriving in the city on 19 November 1688. His troops were not keen to fight William and Mary, and the loyalty of many of his commanders was in doubt. The first blood was shed at Wincanton, in Somerset. In Salisbury, James heard that some of his officers had deserted, such as Edward Hyde, and he broke out in a nose-bleed which he took as an omen that he should retreat. His commander in chief, the Earl of Feversham, advised retreat on 23 November, and the next day John Churchill deserted to William. On 26 November, James's own daughter, Princess Anne, did the same, and James returned to London the same day, never again to be at the head of a serious military force in England. Source: Wikipedia.

There is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page and The Big Picture is there for you to download. Please click on links below to visit.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

Find out more about Frank and his 3d books of Bruges, Ypres and more.
See what the media are saying about this website.
Learn about the old Zummerzet language.

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Buy books,CD's and DVD's based on Somerset and the other places featured.

A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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5th February 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SALTFORD and the second page of SALISBURY in WILTSHIRE.

Saltford can appear a fairly mundane village as you drive through it on the A4, but it is in fact an interesting gem of a place. Running parallel to the main road is the old village High Street. A walk through said street will find charming stone-built cottages, a former schoolroom that is now the church hall, and, nearby, is the Manor House, reputed to be the oldest inhabited manor house in the country.  Saltford used to be famous for brass manufacture and the old brass mill, now in some need of repair, still stands by the weir. The brass was hammered out by huge mechanical hammers and at one time was exported worldwide. At the top end of the village is Jeffreys Lodge, so called because the famous/infamous Judge Jeffreys lodged there for some time. Another interesting place is Brunel House, formerly called Tunnel House because the railway tunnel runs literally beneath it. Apparently Isambard Brunel once lodged there. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute .

The location for Salisbury was chosen for a settlement because of the abundance of water. The city's origins go back to the Iron Age. The Romans called it "Sorviodunum". In modern Welsh the city is Caersallog. There was a battle between the West Saxons and the Britons here, after which the place was called "Searoburh". The Normans built a castle and called it "Searesbyrig" or "Seresberi". By 1086, in the Domesday Book, it was called "Salesberie". The site of the castle is now known as Old Sarum. The first Salisbury Cathedral was built at Old Sarum by St Bishop Osmund between 1075 and 1092. A larger building was built on the same site circa 1120. However, deteriorating relations between the clergy and the military at Old Sarum led to the decision to re-site the cathedral elsewhere. Thus the city of New Sarum, known as Salisbury, was founded in 1220, and the building of the new cathedral begun by Bishop Richard Poore in that year. The main body was completed in only 38 years and is a masterpiece of Early English architecture. Some stones which make up the cathedral came from Old Sarum, others from the Chilmark Quarries from where they were floated down the River Nadder in small boats. The 123 m (400 ft) tall spire was built later and is the tallest spire in the UK. The cathedral is built on a gravel bed with unusually shallow foundations of 18 inches (46 cm) upon wooden faggots: the site is supposed to have been selected by shooting an arrow from Old Sarum, although this can only be legend as the distance is over 3 kilometres (1.9 mi). It is sometimes claimed the arrow hit a white deer, which continued to run and died on the spot where the Cathedral now exists. The cathedral library contains the best preserved of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta. In 1386, a large mechanical clock was installed at Salisbury Cathedral, the oldest surviving mechanical clock in Britain. Source: Wikipedia.

As usual there is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page and this week features a new picture on The Big Picture page. Please click on links below to visit.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

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See what the media are saying about this website.
Learn about the old Zummerzet language.

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A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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29th January 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - MONKTON COMBE and also the first page of a four week feature on SALISBURY in WILTSHIRE.

Monkton Combe nestles in the south-facing slope of the valley of Limpley stoke. The word Combe originates from the word ‘Cume’, meaning hollow or low situation. Throughout the medieval period the monks from Bath Abbey worked in the valley, grinding their corn, tending their flocks etc for more than five centuries. Cume thus became known as ‘Moncken Cume’, the Monks’ Valley. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries the old stability was lost and the manor of Monkton Combe was sold. The village still contains many historical buildings including a farmhouse with mullioned windows, part of which dates from 1490, an ancient dovecote, a water-mill (now disused) and a Lock-Up dating from 1776, with a domed roof, strong windowless walls and a stout iron-studded door. It is thought to be unique in having two cells inside. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute .

Mrs 3d and I visited Salisbury last weekend. Mrs 3d went off around the shops and I took my new Samsung S1070 cameras out for a test-drive. After years of using a pair of Canon iXus cameras I thought it about time I upgraded. After getting used to the controls, and with how light they were, I headed off into the city to try them out. They were easy to use, could be made to go silent so were discrete where necessary, and the large viewfinder on the back made lining up the images a breeze. Once home the picture quality was thoroughly checked on the computer and I was not disappointed. The indoor shots clearly showed the benefit of an anti-shake feature. The colours were good though contrast was a tad weak. Overall though I am more than happy with my choice. If you were thinking of buying one (or two) and had doubts because of the low price then I can recommend that you go ahead without fear. Amazon appear to have the best deal for now. Click on the BOOK STORE link below and then on DIGITAL CAMERAS to have a look for yourself.

A reminder that there is another entry on the Speakin Zummerzet page. Please click on link shown below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

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A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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22nd January 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CAMERTON.

One time Rector John Skinner put Camerton on the map with his diaries. Originally trained as a lawyer the Reverend was unfortunate in his personal relationships and was totally unsuited to parish life. He did his duties conscientiously, according to his own standards, but confided in his diary ‘I am tied hands and feet, and placed in a pillory to be pelted at by Methodists, Catholics, and Colliers; and moreover a combination of worthless farmers and an overbearing woman with an unprincipled steward to contend with.... Who will undertake the office of a Clergyman if he is exposed to the miseries I have sustained during the twenty five years I have been Rector at Camerton’. It was all too much for him and he took his gun, went into the woods near the rectory and shot himself. His diaries leave a vivid and detailed picture of the hard life of a mining area in the early 19th century. Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute .

Don't forget to check out the new entry for Speakin Zummerzet. Please click on link shown below.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

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15th January 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BURNETT, and more pictures have been added to the SHEPTON MALLET page.

A Christian place of worship has existed in Burnett for more than 1000 years. In 1084, when Burnett belonged to William the Conqueror, the hamlet was valued at £4. In 1102 the village passed into control of the Benedictine monks of Tewksbury, who worshipped in the church on their way to Glastonbury Abbey. The first recorded rector of St Michael’s was Hugh Fitzede in 1191. The 16th century shows the village being in the ownership of a wealthy Bristol trader and financier named John Cutte, who renovated the church. The famous Cutte brass now decorates one of the walls inside. A silver chalice was also purchased and given to the church and is still in use today for festive occasions. For security reasons the chalice is not kept at the church when not in use. A memorial plaque for Major-General Sir James Wilson, who returned to the village after fighting in the Napoleonic Wars, also features in the church. There is a portrait of the great man and his engraved sword is also in the church’s possession. Source: The church of St Michael's leaflet.

A long overdue update to the Shepton Mallet page features my very early attempts at 3d. The photos were taken in October & November 2005. The town has had its fair share of criticism over the years, a lot of it from the town's residents. Speaking as a Sheptonian I feel the town has much to offer and is an interesting town to walk around. There is a lot of history around the old streets and would recommend any visitor to pop in to the Tourist Information Office at the top of the town and seek out a town guide and explore the hidden gems. I'm sure you won't be disappointed.

Another new word is featured on the SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET page.

THE BIG PICTURE continues to be of West Harptree. It will be available for downloading for three more weeks.

 

FRANK MATTHYS         MEDIA         SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET         W.A.M.         BOOK STORE        THE BIG PICTURE

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A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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8th January 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LIMPLEY STOKE, and BROADWAY Worcestershire. Both of these villages are loacated in the Cotswolds.

Limpley Stoke is on the southern edge of the Cotswolds "area of outstanding natural beauty" and is in the heart of the Bath green belt, right on the border of Somerset and Wiltshire. For the purposes of this website I am going with Multimap when stating that this village is in Somerset. The A36 road splits the village in half with the older part of the village on the lower slopes. It is a long-established village whose history dates back over 1,000 years. St Mary's church dates back to the 13th Century and is well worth a visit. Scratched on its inside walls are crosses, said to have been made by local knights before leaving for the crusades. Source: The Limpley Stoke website.

Mrs 3d and I visited Broadway this Christmas during a 3 day break in the Cotswolds. I didn't take my 3d cameras but managed to capture a few 3d's with the one camera I did take. The village is actually in Worcestershire and is billed as the tourist centre for the Cotswolds. The village name derives quite naturally from the width of the main street. The width is due to it covering two streams that run down each side of the original, narrower road. The Lygon Arms commemorates General Lygon, an eccentric local who had his estate planted with clumps of trees in the same formation as the troops at the battle of Waterloo, so that he could re-enact the battle. Source: The visitors guide to the Cotswolds by Richard Sale.

SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET is back and introduces a new series of words, in the way the old Zummerzet folk used to speak.

THE BIG PICTURE this week is one of West Harptree. It will be available for downloading for the next four weeks.

Bienvenue aux nouveaux visiteurs du site internet Français Disney Central Plaza. Merci de visiter mon site. J’èspère que les photos vous plaisent. N’hésitez pas à m’envoyer un email pour me faire savoir ce que vous pensez de mon site. Vous pouvez m’écrire en Français, ma femme traduira pour moi.

 

FRANK MATTHYS       MEDIA       SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET       W.A.M.       THE BIG PICTURE

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A big 3d picture for you to download and keep. Updated regularly.

 

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1st January 2009

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STANTON DREW.

Stanton Drew has changed much over the years but many things remain unchanged. The three Stone Circles are probably around 4000 years old, but nobody really knows why they are there. The legend of the Wicked Wedding suggests a wedding party was turned to stone for dancing on the sabbath. Under no circumstances should anyone count the stones or evil will befall, apparently. Another well known landmark in the village is the Roundhouse. Originally it was a lookout tower for Stanton Court, and later a toll house. A 14th century bridge still spans the River Chew, despite one or two mishaps with careless drivers. The Domesday book records the manor belonging to Roger de Stanton (scroll down to second entry). A later member of the family had the name Drogo or Drew, hence Stanton Drew.

THE BIG PICTURE remains the special Christmas 3d photo for one more week.

An early update for me today, as I thought it would be a good idea to have some quality time with Mrs 3d tonight, instead of being sat at my laptop as usual on a Wednesday evening. So, I'd like to say a big HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL ALL and may all your New Year resolutions last longer than they did last year.

More information and software available via the following links:

SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET, FRANK MATTHYS (You can now buy his books via PayPal), MEDIA and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website.

 

Source: The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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25th December 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ENGLISHCOMBE.

Now part of the Duchy of Cornwall estate Englishcombe once belonged to Nigel de Gournay. This was at the time William the Conquerer ordered the Domesday survey in 1086. It is sumised that Nigel originated from Gournay in France and the ownership of the village would have been earned by fighting for William. Another member of the family, Robert, is thought to be responsible for the church being built early in the 12th century. Robert de Gournay died in 1269 and is buried alongside his uncle, Maurice, in the chapel of St Mark's Hospital in Bristol (now the Lord Mayor's Chapel, College Green). A more thorough history of Englishcombe can be found by visiting the village's own excellent website. The link can be found on the village page.

*** BOXING DAY UPDATE***

For those of you looking to purchase any of Frank Matthys' 3d books I thought you'd like to know that he has just added the ability to pay via PayPal to his site. Please remember to mention Somerset3d when ordering. Many thanks.

THE BIG PICTURE this week features a special Christmas themed 3d photo for you to download.

So, Christmas is here again. I hope you all have a super time and have positive thoughts about the New Year. Thank you for your support during the year and I look forward to providing more Somerset villages in 3d for you in 2009.

There is more information and software available via the following links: SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET, FRANK MATTHYS, MEDIA and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website. You can do so by clicking here.

Source: The Parish of Englishcombe by Jean Manco.

 

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18th December 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - DUNDON and a feature on FRANK MATTHYS, the man behind the 3d book of Bruges.

Although named in Compton Dundon I felt the suffix deserved it's own entry. Dundon half circles a cone-shaped hill with an ancient camp at its summit named Dundon Beacon. The camp was an Iron Aged settlement and there is evidence of some Roman occupation. The 13th century church of St Andrew contains a Jacobean pulpit and the churchyard Yew tree is reputed to be over 1000 years old.

THE BIG PICTURE, featuring the Somerset village of Stogumber, continues to be available for downloading.

This week I have uploaded a feature on Frank Matthys. As regular visitors will know Frank is responsible for the 3d book of Bruges that my wife bought me whilst in the city earlier in the year. I was so enthralled with the book that I contacted the publisher to find out more. It led me to exchanging emails with Frank, who is both the publisher and photographer, and he agreed to answer some questions from me to post on this site. This he duly did, in Dutch as well as English and, as a bonus, Frank also agreed to let me have some of his anaglyphs to add to the feature. These will be found at the bottom of the article. I also persuaded my lovely wife to translate the text to French. Click here to go to the feature. I hope you enjoy it.

I have put a short message on the Speakin Zummerzet page along with something to think about during Christmas.

There is more information and software available via the following links: MEDIA and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website. You can do so by clicking here.

Source: The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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11th December 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHAPEL ALLERTON (Link now fixed, my error, sorry).

Chapel Allerton can boast to have one of only two remaining windmills in Somerset, and also of it being the last working windmill in the county. First mentioned as a mill in 1317 the present building dates from around 1760, and was last used in 1927. It has since been fully restored and is now owned by Sedgemoor District Council. It is open to the public from Easter to September on Sundays and Bank Holidays and on Wednesdays during July and August, between 2.30pm and 4.30pm. Admission is free. The windmill and the village lay on the south-west side of a low ridge known as the Isle of Wedmore. In the Domesday Book the entry for the village is recorded as Alwarditone.

THE BIG PICTURE, featuring the Somerset village of Stogumber, continues to be available for downloading.

Some of my 3d pictures are being featured on a new website called 'The World in 3D'. It is run by Stefan Hoevenaars and I'm more than pleased to have some of my pictures on his website for more people to see. Good luck with the project Stefan. I've also decided to add more photos to my Flickr account. Up until now I've limited what I've put on the site as I wanted to try and sell pictures via my own photography website, but, after some thought, I felt that Flickr will give me a far greater audience, and feedback, for me to be able to develop (no pun intended) and improve my photography skills. I've only added one more set so far, of photos from Sardinia, but there will me more to follow. Let me know what you think.

There is more information and software available via the following links: MEDIA, SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website. You can do so by clicking here.

Source: The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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4th December 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PORTISHEAD.

Portishead Dock was completed in 1879, and ships arrived with cargoes of grain, timber and coal. When the railway was added employment increased, leading to new houses being built for the increasing population. A light railway was opened in 1897 connecting Portishead to Clevedon and Weston-super-Mare. Owing to a number of destitute boys in the city of Bristol it was decided to establish a training ship in the docks. This led to the Formidable being towed in, and was moored off of Portishead Pier for the next 37 years. The opening was performed by Charles Kingsley in 1869. After the ship came into bad shape an on-shore establishment was built, with the Nautical School being opened in 1906. It was to close down in 1982.

This week see's a new photo for THE BIG PICTURE, featuring the Somerset village of Stogumber.

Yesterday was full of sunshine, so I took advantage and visited some more Somerset villages to put on the website. Coming your way soon will be Draycott, Cocklake, Chapel Allerton, Stone Allerton, Badgworth and Weare. Also, Frank Matthys has been in touch and has replied to a questionnaire I put to him, in Dutch as well as English. He has promised to send me some photos to feature and I will also get his answers to my questions translated to French. So, sometime soon expect a full feature on Frank and his books (For new visitors Frank Matthys is a photographer based in Belgium who has produced a number of 3d books on European cities. I have his book on Bruges and I heartily recommend you visit his website and purchase a copy. You can do so by visiting my Bruges entry and clicking on the 'buy 3d books' link, or by clicking here. Please mention Somerset3d if ordering). One last piece of news is that this website was featured in the 'What we learned on the web this week' section as an internet pick for last weekend's Guardian Technology page and in the Saturday edition of the newspaper (In the reviews section). A big thank you to whomever it was in the Guardian for putting my website forward.

There is more information and software available via the following links: MEDIA, SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website. You can do so by clicking here.

Source:The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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27th November 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - NEWTON St LOE.

The name of Newton St Loe is derived from the Old English for 'new homestead or village' combined with the local land owning family of St Loe. The manor was owned in the 16th century by Bess of Hardwick through her marriage to William St Loe. Later it came into the possession of the Langton family. One of the family, Joseph Langton, built the mansion, Newton Park, in the 1760's. Eventually the Duchy of Cornwall bought the estate, and the City of Bath took over the Georgian house. It is now the Bath College of Higher Education.

The THE BIG PICTURE remains of a scene in Lower Slaughter in the Cotswold's for one more week.

Last weekend I visited the above village along with Saltford, Burnett and Stanton Drew. Thanks to the church caretaker at Burnett I was able to photograph inside the small church and much was learned about the history of the village.

Other links for your interest are the MEDIA, SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER.

Please drop me an email to tell me what you think of the website. You can do so by clicking here.

Source:The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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20th November 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - FRESHFORD, and ABBOTSBURY in DORSET in GALLERY2.

To me, Freshford has a feeling of Bath about it. It's architecture especially gives the impression that this is a tiny peace of the Georgian city set out in the countryside. With Bath only 6 miles away, perhaps this should come as no surprise. There is a rail connection in the village, opened in 1857, on the Weymouth and Portsmouth route from Bath and the Kennet & Avon canal is a short walk away. It is a pleasant village to walk around.

Abbottsbury in Dorset is a very old village, settling amongst the hills behind the great Chesil Bank, which keeps the Channel seas at bay. The village contains the world famous swannery. This bird sanctuary is over 600 years old and nestles in the lagoon behind Chesil Bank. The legend of Chesil Beach is that the 11 mile stretch of pebbles from which it is formed were washed up in a single night. The facts are that it is a million years old and consists of chalk, flint and rocks from distant places. . Roman and medieval coins, rings and gold have been found in the clay that becomes exposed when the gales blow.

The THE BIG PICTURE of a scene in Lower Slaughter in the Cotswold's is still available for a couple more weeks to view and download.

For your information I have added some new photos to the Alan Woollard Photography website, please click here to view (page opens in a new window).

Other links for your interest are the MEDIA page to see what others think of this website, SPEAKIN ZUMMERZET to learn about the Somerset language (I'm working on a series of updates that should be ready for inclusion in the new year) and the WOOLLY ANAGLYPH MAKER page to download the custom made, easy to use software, so you can make your own 3d pictures.

Click here to send me an email and tell me your views on the site.

Sources:The Avon Village Book by The Avon Federation of Women's Institute and The Dorset Village Book by Harry Ashley.

 

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13th November 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BUTLEIGH.

Butleigh has distinguished Naval connections, with several of the famous Hood family being born here. Among them are Alexander Hood (1726-1814) who became Commander of the Channel Fleet, and later Lord Bridport, and Samuel Hood (1724 - 1816) who rose from a midshipman at 16 years old to become Rear Admiral, and was later created Viscount Hood. The village was also the home of Robert Neville Granville, the last squire of Butleigh. He was educated at Eton and Cambridge and was a skilled engineer. He not only drove a railway engine but had one named after him, The Butleigh Court. In 1875 he designed and built the Grenville Steam Carriage, believed to be the world's oldest self-propelled passenger-carrying road vehicle. After use as a road vehicle it was used as a stationary engine to work a cider press. Now it is a prize exhibit at the Industrial Museum in Bristol.

The THE BIG PICTURE of a scene in Lower Slaughter in the Cotswold's is still available to view and download.

Last weekend I was able to take a trip out on the Saturday to increase the Somerset3d stock. I visited Limpley Stoke, Freshford, Monkton Combe, Englishcombe and Camerton. Sunday I was not so lucky. The intention was to capture some villages in the Bristol area, but the weather put paid to most of the day. The rain did stop near the end of the afternoon so I was given the chance to take some 3d's of Portishead before it got too dark. So expect the afore mentioned locations to be featured soon. Fingers crossed for a clear day in the next couple of weeks to build up some more stock before I decide to hibernate.

Just a reminder that the Alan Woollard Photography website can be found by clicking here (page opens in a new window) and the MEDIA page is worth a visit to see what others think of this website. How about telling me what YOU think. Click here to send me an email and tell me your views on the site.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by The Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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6th November 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMBE St NICHOLAS, and the final page for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2 is now available for your viewing pleasure.

Less than 3 miles south of Buckland St Mary (last week's update) is Combe St Nicholas. Soon after the Norman Conquest of 1066 the manor was given to the bishop of Wells, and in 1234 Bishop Jocelin used it to endow the office of Catherdral provost and to generate the saleries of 15 prebendaries in Wells. In consequence the name Combe features more prominently than any other on the backs of the seats in Wells Chapter House.

The last page for Amiens continues the close look of the magnificent interior of the Notre Dame Cathedral.

The THE BIG PICTURE of a scene in Lower Slaughter in the Cotswold's is still there to view and download.

In 3d news this years edition of the Guinness Book of World Records features more than 20 anaglyph photographs and includes a pair of anaglyph glasses. A good christmas present for the world record breaking 3d enthusiast in your home.

After much thought I have decided to retire the blog. Three websites that require regular updating is taking up too much time. So now the 3d news will be shown on this website and the other photography news will feature on the Alan Woollard Photography website that you can find by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

 

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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30th October 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BUCKLAND St MARY, and the 5th page for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2 is now active.

Buckland St Mary lies on the eastern end of the Blackdown Hills, it's name meaning that it was land 'granted by charter' with the suffix of the local church added sometime later. The village centre is based around the large Victorian church of St Mary and, opposite, the old school, that is still in use today. I can recommend a visit to the church to inspect it's unusual decor, though an arranged visit is suggested as the church is locked when not in use.

On the penultimate page for Amiens we continue a close look at the marvelous interior of the Notre Dame Cathedral.

This week see's a new entry for THE BIG PICTURE for you to study and download should you wish. It is of a scene in Lower Slaughter in the Cotswold's.

There is more information on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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23rd October 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WITHYDITCH, and the 4th page for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2 is now available for viewing.

Withyditch Baptist Chapel has been a place of prayer since 1839. Now, along with the nearby Schoolroom, the buildings belong to the Withyditch Chapel Centre, available for hire (See the village page for a link). They stand in a beautiful location overlooking the quiet Cam Valley with the Chapel used once a month for services. In 2004 an old lamp with the legend 'Come to Jesus', which used to hang outside the chapel, was found beneath the staging inside the building; it now hangs in Radstock Museum.

This weeks' Amiens update takes a closer look at the magnificent cathedral, both inside and out.

Click here for 'THE BIG PICTURE', showing a scene from Wellow, available as a download for only one more week.

There is more information on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Source: The internet.

 

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16th October 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SOUTH PETHERTON, and the third page for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2 is now active.

South Petherton was a favourite place of Ina, King of Wessex. He devoted himself to enlarging his kingdom, as well as to religion and the law, and had a residence in the town, with the probable site later becoming known as 'Ina's Palace'. The town was also the resting place of Sir Giles Daubeney, a descendant of William the Conquerer's standard bearer, who was one time Lord of the manor.

I have added some books on Amiens in the Somerset 3d book store. Please click here to peruse and to have a look at the other books on sale.

Click here for 'THE BIG PICTURE', showing a scene from Wellow, available as a download for two more weeks.

There is more information on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird.

 

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9th October 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SOUTHSTOKE, the second page for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2.

Southstoke is a small village just south of the Georgian city of Bath and is built mainly on a hillside. It is said that two former maids of Queen Victoria lived at the village Priory, and were the first of her servants to be pensioned. In the 1940's cannon balls, believed to be relics from the Civil War, were unearthed in the garden of Brewery House, formerly the home of Hunt & Waintwrights Brewery. There is a passage giving right of way, to church and cottages, running right through the bar of the local public house, The Packhorse Inn.

Don't forget that 'THE BIG PICTURE', showing a scene from Wellow, is still available as a download for the next three weeks.

Frank Matthys has produced two more 3d books to add to the Bruges in 3d book previously mentioned. The new books are of Ypres in France and Leuven in Belgium. Click here to visit his website and please remember to mention Somerset3d if you intend to order copies.

Please feel free to send me an email telling me what you think of the site. It's always interesting to find out what you think of the pictures, your favourite village, if you use the Woolly Anaglyph Maker, or just to say hi! You can email me by clicking here.

There is more information on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Source: The Avon Village Book by the Avon Federation of Women’s Institutes.

 

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2nd October 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CARLINGCOTT, the first page of six for AMIENS in FRANCE in GALLERY 2 and a 'HAPPY 3rd BIRTHDAY' TO SOMERSET3D.

Carlingcott is invisible to entries in any of my Somerset village books. What information I can find is limited to basic location details on estate agents websites. My impression of the village was one of quietness and solitude. There was plenty of evidence that restoration work was in process on numerous buildings and so one hopes the character of this peaceful place will be maintained for a few more years to come.

Amiens is a city in northern France, 120 km north of Paris, and has been the scene of many historic moments, such as... it was at the gates of Amiens that Saint Martin of Tours, at the time still a Roman soldier, shared his cloak with a naked beggar. Signed in 1802, the Peace of Amiens marked the end of the French Revolutionary War. The Battle of Amiens, 8 August-3 September 1918, is often seen as the turning point on the Western Front in WWI. During World War II, on 18 February 1944, Nazi-occupied Amiens was the site of Operation Jericho, a British operation which freed 258 people by bombing Amiens prison.

It's October again and that means one thing, it's the website anniversary, 3 years old this month! 3 years of anaglyphs and 3 years of presenting a different Somerset village every week, to you, my faithful viewers. Although anaglyphs are a bit of a specialized interest, and anaglyphs of Somerset villages even more specialized, the people interested in both appear to be growing, as the last 12 months has seen more than double the amount of visitors to this website, compared to the previous year (To give you the figures, 91133 unique visits for year 2 & 189589 for year 3). I find that extremely rewarding. Thank you.

As part of the anniversary celebrations this week is the start of a monthly feature called 'THE BIG PICTURE'. Once a month I will post a full size picture for you to enjoy and download. The first entry of the following month will see another picture take it's place. There will be no archive. The resolution will vary, depending upon what cameras were used to record the original images, but the largest available picture of the subject chosen will be posted. The first picture featured is from the village of Wellow, and can be found by clicking here. I hope you enjoy.

As ever there is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: This photographer and Wikipedia.

 

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25th September 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMBE HAY, and the final page of the new anaglyphs for BRUGES in BELGIUM is now active in GALLERY 2.

Combe Hay is a tiny village that has the traditional manor house, church and village inn nestling amongst old houses and cottages built with the warm coloured stone associated with the Cotswold's. This is because Combe Hay is a Somerset village based within the Cotswold's. Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Cotswold's. cover an area 40km (25 miles) wide and 145km (90miles) long and primarily feature in Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire whilst also featuring in four further counties, Somerset, Warwickshire, Wiltshire and Worcestershire.

Frank Matthys has been in touch re the feature I have planned on him and his Bruges in 3d book. He has been very busy of late but is committed to answering my questions and providing some sample pictures as soon as things become quieter. In the mean-time you are able to purchase the Bruges in 3d book by Frank Matthys by clicking here. Please mention Somerset3d when ordering. Franks' website, FOTOF 3D PHOTOGRAPHY, can be found by clicking here.

As mentioned above there is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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18th September 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PRISTON, and the third page of the new anaglyphs for BRUGES in BELGIUM has been added in GALLERY 2.

In around 930ad King Athelstan gave Priston manor to the Monastery of Bath. 500 years later the dissolution of the Monasteries led to the ownership of the manor passing on to the Longs of Whaddon in Wiltshire. In the early 1700’s the estate was sold to Lord Chedworth and Simon, Earl of Harcourt. In 1756 the Manor was sold on to William Jenkins, who went on to start the first coal mining at Priston in 1764/65. Priston manor was eventually sold to the Ingle family in 1936.

Page three of the four page update contains an image not normally associated with a place like Bruges. Fans of science fiction visiting the city will be pleased to learn that there is a shop catering to your tastes. It's not all lace, chocolates & waffles in Bruges you know. Don't forget that you can purchase the Bruges in 3d book by Frank Matthys by clicking here. Please mention Somerset3d when ordering. Franks' website, FOTOF 3D PHOTOGRAPHY, can be found by clicking here.

As ever there is more information on the blog and my other photography website can be found by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Source: The Priston Web.

 

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11th September 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HOLWELL, and the second page of the new anaglyphs for BRUGES in BELGIUM in GALLERY 2.

The hamlet of Holwell is dominated by Colemans Quarry. Indeed, if you don’t make the effort to stop and explore you wouldn’t think there was anything but a quarry and a pub at Holwell. Quarrying activity has taken place at Colemans for well over 100 years and was initially operated commercially by the Coleman family. It currently operates as Bardon Aggregates, a subsidiary of Aggregate Industries. Lead, zinc and manganese ores have been worked (particularly in the west and central Mendip regions) since Roman times and commercially in the more recent period. The quarry comprises a number of pits that are divided by the main highway, the A361, and the local road network.

Contact has been made with Frank Matthys, the photographer and publisher of the Bruges in 3d book, as mentioned in last weeks blog, and a full review, including a small Q&A with the man himself, will appear here soon. In the meantime I can tell you that the book will cost €24 plus p&p. At the moment the ordering page on Frank's website is only in Dutch. There will soon be a French, German and English version though so please be patient. If your Dutch is good then you can order the book by clicking here. Please mention Somerset3d when ordering. Franks' website, FOTOF 3D PHOTOGRAPHY, can be found by clicking here.

As mentioned above there is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Source: Geodiversity Audit of Active Aggregate Quarries (PDF document).

 

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4th September 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - DUNKERTON, and the first of four new pages for BRUGES in BELGIUM in GALLERY 2.

In the 18th and 19th century Dunkerton was surrounded by several coal mines on the Somerset coalfield. Evidence remains in the powderhouse which dates from 1870 and is a grade II listed building. The mine was the site of riots in 1908-9 about the working conditions in the Dunkerton Pit. Parts of the Ealing comedy The Titfield Thunderbolt were filmed at the disused Dunkerton Colliery. The All Saints' Church dates from the 14th century and is also a grade II listed building.

I have tidied up the Bruges entry to create 4 pages out of the original one. This should help the page load quicker and enable easier navigation. It also enables me to add additional pages more easily. The new pictures will mostly show areas of Bruges I had not previously visited. The first new page starts on page 5. The link above will take you straight there. Please visit the BLOG for some 3d news about BRUGES.

There is another entry on the MEDIA page. Thanks to the good people at DISNEY-LINKS for their review.

As mentioned above there is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Source: Wikipedia .

 

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28th August 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CREECH St MICHAEL.

The manor in Creech St Michael was held by Edith of Wessex, the sister of King Harold, in 1066. Then was seized by William the Conquerer and subsequently granted to Count of Moertain circa 1100. The River Tone runs through the parish along with the Bridgewater to Taunton Canal, completed in 1827. The eccentric Henry Cresswell, vicar 1813-51, indulged in cudgel fighting and playwriting, and was suspended in 1844 for bankruptcy and violence.

There is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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21st August 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HEMINGTON.

The name Hemmington is of Saxon origin, probably the settlement of a chieftan called Hemm or Hemma. Fame, or notoriety, touched the village in 1740 when the occupants of a nearby farmhouse, a Madam Elizabeth Branch and her daughter, were convicted of causing the death of an unfortunate servant girl. They were hanged in Ilchester the following May.

As usual there is more information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute.

 

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14th August 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CHARD.

Chard, the ‘Birthplace of Powered Flight’. At every approach to Chard this can be read on the welcoming signs. It was here in June 1848, that John Stringfellow (1790-1883) first flew a heavier than air steam powered aircraft with a 10ft wingspan down the length of a former lace mill. He was to go on to demonstrate his models at the Crystal Palace in London in 1868. Other Chard worthies include James Gillingham (c.1840-1924), shoemaker and pioneer developer of artificial limbs, and Margaret Bondfield (1873-1953), daughter of a local lace-worker, who in 1929 became Britain’s first woman cabinet minister and Privy Councillor.

I have updated the MEDIA page to include a link to the BBC Somerset feature for the website back in February this year. Click here to go straight to the BBC article.

More information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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7th August 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - NEMPNETT THRUBWELL and VENTNOR completes the ISLE OF WIGHT special.

The fantastically named Nempnett Thrubwell is situated above Blagdon Lake, the village is scattered amongst the winding lanes that meander their way around the countryside. Well known local musician, Adge Cutler, celebrated the village name in song. The suffix stems from the Thrub Well, a spring that once featured in the village long ago. There was also a manor house but now the village is famous only for its name.

Ventnor was promoted as a Spa town in the 1830’s and its distinguished visitors have included a young Winston Churchill and an elderly Karl Marx. The town's Botanical Gardens is the home of some 10,000 plants; amongst them are many rare and exotic trees, shrubs, alpines, perennials, succulents and conifers.

More information is on the blog (including some free wallpapers) and you can visit my other (recently updated) photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: The Avon Village Book by the Avon Federation of Women’s Institutes and the Isle of Wight Village Book by the Isle of Wight Federation of Women’s Institutes.

Buy Somerset Books.

 

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31st July 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STAPLE FITZPAINE, and COWES is the penultimate entry for the ISLE OF WIGHT special. WESTON-SUPER-MARE is also featured.

The name of Staple Fitzpaine derives from the Olde English stapole, meaning pillar or post. Some feel that this refers to the sarsen stone, an ancient stone of a different nature from that found locally, which stands near the church. Local tradition claims that it was hurled there by the Devil and that it will bleed when pricked with a pin at certain times of the year. The suffix was provided by the Fitzpaine family who owned the manor between 1307 & 1393. The church of St peter is blessed with one of the fine Perpendicular towers for which Somerset is famous.

Separated by the River Medina and linked by a chain ferry, the Isle of Wight's most northerly towns of Cowes and East Cowes are steeped in maritime heritage. Cowes is a Mecca for yachtsmen and hosts many national and international events. During the sailing season the waterfront is a kaleidoscope of colourful sails, whose focal point is the Royal Yacht Squadron. East Cowes is the terminus of the car and passenger ferry from Southampton. The town has its own small shopping centre, lively marina and seafront promenade. It is also home to Queen Victoria's magnificent Osborne House.

Many of you will be aware of the huge inferno that destroyed the historic Grand Pier at Weston-super-Mare on Monday (28th July). It was a very sad day for the locals and, of course, for the owners. The speed at which the blaze caught hold of, and destroyed the structure was amazing. The BBC report on the day of the tragedy can be viewed by clicking here. For this week's update I thought it would be correct to update the Weston-super-Mare page to include all the 3d's I had of the Pier. I'm sure you will join me in wishing the owners, brother and sister Michelle and Kerry Michael, well with their plans to rebuild this popular building.

More information is on the blog and you can visit my other photography website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and the Isle of Wight Tourist Information office . Buy Somerset Books.

 

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24th July 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LULLINGTON, and the second of two pages for BEMBRIDGE in the ISLE OF WIGHT.

Before the Norman Conquest the estate at Lullington belonged to King Harold, killed at Hastings. In 1855 the village was described as ‘ruinous’ and ‘not worth having’, but William Duckworth, the new owner, employed George Davey to create a model village with new cottages and farms. The church of All Saints at Lullington was described by Dr Nikolaus Pevsner as ‘perhaps the most enjoyable Norman church in Somerset’, and by Arthur Mee as a ‘gem of England’. The earliest Norman churches were strong, massive structures of stern simplicity. This church reflects the transitional period from Norman to Early English, when the art of decoration was just beginning to emerge, thus Lullington’s church is remarkable and in many respects unique.

The Mortons were on of the influential families who settled in Bembridge over 130 years ago. The family were instrumental in bringing the railway to the town, and in establishing a horse boat to bring over horses and carriages, and a passenger steamboat service to Portsmouth. The last train ran from Brading to Bembridge in October 1953, and modern flats now occupy the site of the railway station.

As usual more information is on the blog and you can visit my normal 2d website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and the Isle of Wight Village Book by the Isle of Wight Federation of Women’s Institutes. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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17th July 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SEAVINGTON St MICHAEL, and the first of two pages for BEMBRIDGE in the ISLE OF WIGHT continues the island special.

The manor in Seavington St Michael was held by Siward the falconer in 1086 and had passed by 1252 to Adam Dane, from whom it was known as Seavington Dennies. Later owners include Glastonbury Abbey (1483-1539) and Winchester College (1551-1932). The church of St Michael contains a civilian effigy, circa 1290, that is believed to represent a member of Adam Dane’s family.

In 1338 William Russell, Lord of Yaverland, bridged the River Yar at Yarbridge to prevent his manor being cut off from the village of Brading. The peninsula area was then referred to as ‘Within Bridge’, corrupted to ‘Binbridge’, and finally ‘Bembridge’. The village remained for years as a scanty collection of huts and farm-houses, until in the early 19th century; wealthy people began to settle in the area.

More information is on the blog and you can visit my normal 2d website by clicking here (page opens in a new window).

There is a new entry on the MEDIA page from the excellent SWELL3D website, in the form of a very satisfying review. Thank you Sean.

Please visit the Somerset 3d book store if you wish to purchase books on any of the places featured on this website.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and the Isle of Wight Village Book by the Isle of Wight Federation of Women’s Institutes. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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10th July 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WELLOW, and CULVER CLIFF is the second featured place in the ISLE OF WIGHT special.

The church of St Julian in Wellow dates from 1372 and was built under the patronage of the Hungerford family. Sir Thomas Hungerford had the distinction of being the first Speaker of the House of Commons, his name being formally mentioned in the rolls of Parliament, taking office in 1377.

The sweeping views atop of Culver Cliff (or Culver Down) are well worth the coastal walk from Sandown or Bembridge. On top of the hill is an early Victorian Fort, built as a military vantage point for the defence of Sandown Bay and Spithead from invasion. Between the fort and the sea is a coastal and anti-aircraft battery from the Second World War, built for the same purpose.

More information is on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page, click here to visit (Page opens in a new window).

For those of you who don't visit the blog I can inform you here that I have just launched another photography website, for my normal 2d pictures. If you are interested then please visit the blog for more details or click here to go straight to the new site (Page will open in a new window).

I have also made it much easier for you to buy books or DVD's on the places I have visited. If you visit the Somerset 3d book store you will see categories covering nearly all of the places I have been to so far. So, all the hard work has been done for you. All you have to do is choose which one to buy. Happy browsing.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute and The Hidden Places of Dorset, Hampshire & The Isle of Wight by David Gerrard. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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3rd July 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LAVERTON, with the town of SANDOWN kicking off the ISLE OF WIGHT special.

The Duchy of Cornwall owned village of Laverton flourished with the woollen trade in the 18th century. Clothiers would visit Frome and the surrounding villages each week distributing wool and collecting spun yarn. Amongst the rectors at it’s Norman church during this time was William Keate, father of John, who became a noteworthy headmaster of Eton College, and Robert, who was a member of the Council of Surgeons for many years and its President three times.

Sandown is the island's premier resort with a lively town and a Blue Flag beach. The town also host the island’s zoo which specializes in breeding severely endangered exotic species and is home to the UK’s largest variety of Royal Bengal, Siberian and Chinese tigers. The zoo is also a World Health Organisation centre for venomous snakes, their venom extracted for use in snake bite antidotes.

More information is on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page, click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Hidden Places of Dorset, Hampshire & The Isle of Wight by David Gerrard. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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26th June 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HATCH BEAUCHAMP and the final page for St OMER is now online.

Hatch Beauchamp derived its name from the powerful Beauchamp family who arrived in the county at the time of the Norman Conquest. Hatch Court, finished in 1775, is a fine Palladian style house constructed of Bath stone. The nearby church of St John is mainly 15th century and contains a 16th century font. One of the villages associations is Colonel J.R.M. Chard V.C., R.E., a hero of Rorke’s Drift, who died at his brother’s rectory in the village in 1897. He is buried in the churchyard here. Queen Victoria sent a wreath to the Colonel’s funeral and the Royal Engineers come to pay regular homage here.

Last week my local newspaper did a small feature on this website, please visit the MEDIA page should you wish to have a look.

As ever more on what I've been up to is on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page, click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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19th June 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COXLEY and the second page for St OMER is now available for viewing .

Coxley, pronounced Coaxley, is a village on the Wells to Glastonbury road where the Mendips meet the Somerset Levels. The 200 year old Pound Inn derives its name from a nearby pound that was once used to keep stray animals.

More information on what I've been up to on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page, click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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12th June 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STOKE SUB HAMDON and the first of three pages for St OMER in FRANCE.

Stoke-Sub-Hamdon is a Ham-stone village to the north of and below Ham Hill, as indicated by the latter part of its name. Roman remains have been found in the north of the parish and an inscribed column at Venn Bridge was also unearthed. The place was a noted centre for quarrying. The land owners, the Duchy of Cornwall, acquirred it in 1443. The church of St Mary is one of the most ancient and interesting in the county and contains good examples of wide ranging periods of church architexture.

St Omer has been a major trading town for more than 1,000 years. The old market square gradually became too small to accommodate all the traders and a larger market square was created in the 13th century, and this is still used today. Along the main thoroughfares that link the market squares to the old port can be found majestic rows of classical facades from the 18th & 19th centuries. One of the major highlights of the town is the magnificent cathedral, the Basilica of Notre-Dame. It is the only large Gothic church to be seen in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais and is well worth a visit.

Thank you for your patience whilst I was doing the housework on the website yesterday evening. The end result was well worth it from my point of view and more details as to what I did and why I had to do it are on the blog.

Another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page so click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird, Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and the St Omer Tourist Board. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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5th June 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HINTON CHARTERHOUSE.

Hinton Charterhouse is the home of the second Carthusian monastery in England, Hinton Priory. It was founded by Ela, Countess of Salisbury. Excavations in the 1950’s revealed outlines of a simple church and a great cloister, with 14 little houses around it, each with a walled garden, to give the monks the solitude for which they had joined the Order. However, not all the monks found the quiet life to their taste. Brother Stephen of Hinton was a famous visionary at the end of the 15th century, and Nicholas Hopkins, a spiritual director of the 3rd Duke of Buckingham, predicted that the Duke would succeed to the Throne. In 1521 Hopkins found himself in the Tower of London for his unwise words, and Buckingham was executed.

IMPORTANT NEWS - THIS WEDNESDAY (11th June) I WILL BE DOING SOME WEBSITE HOUSEKEEPING AND, AS A CONSEQUENCE, PARTS OF THE WEBSITE MAY NOT BE ACCESSABLE DURING THIS TIME. I WILL ATTEMP TO KEEP THE DISRUPTION TO A MINIMUM. Thank you for your support.

More information on the blog and yet another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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29th May 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ASHILL.

The manor at Ashill descended from the de Vaux family to the Moultons, Sir Thomas Moulton securing in 1317 the grant of a Wednesday market and two three-day fairs here. Thereafter the estate passed in turn to the Stretche and Beauchamp families and on to the Spekes. The church of The Virgin Mary has Norman doorways and a fine Norman chancel arch. The church contains two effigies. One female identified as Lady Maud de Moulton (died 1293) and the other male, a Knight said to be of Sir John Stretche (died 1390).

More information on the blog and yet another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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22nd May 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WINCANTON and the last instalment for GENT is now available to view.

Like most Somerset towns Wincanton subsited on cloth manufacture, specializing in the early 18th century in making Spanish medley cloth and later linen, dowlas and ticking. Nathaniel Ireson (1686-1769) moved here circa 1726, having built Stourhead to Colin Campbell’s designs, but became a succesful architect in his own right. A local bed of clay provided him with the raw material for brick making and for his Delft pottery (dated pieces 1737-48) that are now very collectable. His striking monument in the churchyard bears a terracotta statue which he is believed to have sculpted himself. 

More information on the blog and yet another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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15th May 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WOOLVERTON (link now fixed) and the penultimate page for GENT is now ready for viewing.

Woolverton is situated on the west bank of the river Frome, opposite Rode. The manor was included under Rode in the Domesday Book but for most of the Middle Ages was held by the Turney family until until it was acquired by the Hungerfords of Farleigh in the 16th century.  

More information on the blog and yet another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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8th May 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HORSINGTON and the second page for GENT is now available for viewing.

Horsington, meaning ‘the settlement of the horse keeper’, is tucked away off the A357. The church of St John the Baptist has a 15th century west tower but otherwise was completely rebuilt in 1885-87. Inside the church is a 15th century font with angels’ heads and monuments to the Gifford, Spencer, Dodington and Wickham families. The Wickhams were rectors here from 1686 until 1897.

There is more information on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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1st May 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CURRY MALLET and also the first of four pages for GENT in BELGIUM.

Curry Mallet is almost entirely owned by His Royal Highness Prince Charles, as one of his Duchy of Cornwall estates. The Prince frequently visits the tenant farms of the village. Every year in early January the medieval service of Blessing the Plough is still held. The farmers bring the seed corn to be blessed and the farm workers and various tradesmen bring their tools of trade and process to the altar, followed by the plough which is carried in. The ancient plough is kept permanently in the church.

Gent is the capital and biggest city of the East Flanders province. The city started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Lys and became in the Middle Ages one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe. Every year a ten day long street festival is held called the Ghent Fests. In 2007 it saw 1.5 million people flock to its streets. Much of the city's medieval architecture remains intact and is remarkably well preserved and restored. Its center is the largest carfree area in Belgium.

There is much more information about this week's update on the blog and another Zummerzet word is explained on the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute and Wikipedia. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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24th April 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CUCKLINGTON.

The village of Cucklington is situated on a ridge above the Blackmoor Vale and commands magnificent views across Somerset and Dorset.  The church of St Lawrence is mostly 13th century and contains a medieval window depicting the head of St Barbara.

Go to the blog for more information and yet another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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17th April 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - UPHILL.

Early 19th century quarrying in Uphill exposed evidence of very early occupation, with flint tools and animal bones found in a small cave indicating habitation 40,000 years ago. The oldest building to survive the ravages of time stands defiantly on the hilltop. The old Church of St Nicholas, built just after the Norman Conquest of 1066, may be on the site of an earlier Saxon church. The roof was partially removed in 1864 and with the building of the new St Nicholas Church in a more accessible part of the village; 'Old Nick' fell into disuse and is now looked after by the Churches Conservation Trust. The writer Hannah More, a friend of the social reformer William Wilberforce, stayed some time in the village and the poet William Lisle Bowles was the son of a former rector.

Yet more information from France on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: From the website Welcome to Uphill Village. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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10th April 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BURRINGTON.

BURRINGTON  is situated at the foot of the Mendip Hills, and contains the hamlet of Langford. In the side of the hills is a rocky ravine called Burrington Combe. The rocks in some places being 250 feet high. Two remarkable caverns exist here, each of which, when discovered, contained a large number of human skeletons. It is here that we can also find the ‘Rock of Ages’. In about 1775 the curate of Blagdon, Augustus Toplady, was passing through the gorge when he was surprised by a violent storm and was forced to take shelter in a cleft of a rock. While he was there he passed the time by composing a hymn, Rock of Ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in thee.

More information from France on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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3rd April 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ISLE ABBOTTS.

Isle Abbotts takes its name from the river Isle. The second part of its name derives from its ownership by Muchelney Abbey from Saxon times until the dissolution of the abbey in 1538. The church of St Mary the Virgin at the eastern end of the village is a magnificent building into which the Muchelney monks ploughed considerable resources.

There is important news on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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27th March 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - MILBORNE PORT.

Milborne Port is in a corner of Somerset that is surrounded on three sides by its neighbouring county of Dorset, to that end it also has a Dorset postal code. The suffix of Port is from the Saxon word for town or market. There is a 'Cotswolds' feel to the place with a golden yellow hue to many of its buildings. The parish church of St John is thought to be the oldest in Somerset and contains Norman and Saxon arches.

As ever there are more details on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Buy Somerset Books.

 

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20th March 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BLEADON and more pictures added at MILTON CLEVEDON.

In Bleadon, in 1997, there was a skeleton found during an archaeological excavation near Whitegare Farm. The excavations were the cause of planning permission being sought for a proposed building development. An investigation was launched resulting in the skeleton, by now called the Bleadon Man, believed to belong to a farmer who was about 50 years old when he died, over 2000 years ago. DNA testing confirmed that four people living in the surrounding area were related to this Iron Age man. Visit the Parish Council web site for more information by clicking on the link below.

Milton Clevedon is a village and civil parish 1 mile south of Evercreech. An early Iron-Age earthwork, probably a stock enclosure but known as the Castle, occupies a spur of Creech Hill overlooking the Alham valley. The site includes a possible barrow on the west. The Church of St. James was rebuilt in 1790 and is a grade II listed building.

More details on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' web page. Click here to visit (page opens in a new window).

Sources: Bleadon Parish Council web site and Wikipedia. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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13th March 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LOXTON.

In the Domesday book Loxton is entered as Lochestone, meaning, the river Lox enclosure. The village has been populated since Norman times. Old mine-workings on the hills, indicate that at one time mining was abundant, probably for calamine, lead, copper and more recently yellow ochre. The Parish Church of St Andrew dates from the 11th century and is a grade II listed building.

More details on the blog and another word is explained in the 'Speakin' Zummerzet' feature below.

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and Wikipedia. Buy Somerset Books.

***Speakin Zummerzet***

Each week a word commonly used in the county is explained, along with it's meaning and examples of its use.

This week’s word is ‘Gurt’, meaning ‘Great', but only as in size (Great big) rather than stature (Great Britain).

Commonly used in phrases such as;

"Ere, e's a gurt big young'n inner?" = "Hey, He's great big youngster isn't he?"

and "I 'ad a gurt big dollop of the stuff" = "I had a great big serving of the stuff". A 'Dollop' is a term used to describe one serving of anything, food, medicine, lubricant etc.

As you can see Gurt is followed by big, so in effect they are one and the same. We wouldn't say Gurt on it's own. it would always be 'Gurt big'.

From next week, to keep things tidy, this feature will have it's own page with a link from the News page to it.

 

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6th March 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CURRY RIVEL and the third and last page of the TETBURY feature is now available to view .

Curry Rival is named after the Revel family who were Lords of the Manor in the 12th Century. However, the meaning behind the first part of the village name, Celtic in origin, remains an unsolved mystery. Inside the church of St Andrew is the famous Jennings Memorial of the two brothers in Trooper uniforms with their wives and children kneeling around them. The brothers are Robert and Marmaduke Jennings who died in 1625 and 1630 respectively and lived and farmed at Burton Farm.

As usual there are more details on this weeks' update on the blog and a NEW feature which can be found below.

Source: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

AND NOW FOR THE START OF A NEW WEEKLY FEATURE:

***Speakin Zummerzet***

As people travel and relocate the old words and dialects are gradually changing and being lost. So ‘Speakin Zummerzet’ is an attempt to redress the balance. Each week I’ll introduce a word commonly used in the county and it’s meaning, along with an example of its use.

This week’s word is ‘inner’, meaning ‘isn’t he/it.

Commonly used in phrases such as;

“E’s a brite spark inner?” = “He’s very clever isn’t he?”

and “E’s a bit spensive inner?” = “It’s a bit expensive isn’t it?”

As you can see ‘E’ can mean He or It and the ‘er’ bit of ‘inner’ can refer to He/She or It.

Another thing to remember when speaking Zummerzet is that we rarely finish a word or pronounce the consonants at the end of words.

So the ‘t’ in ‘brite’ is almost silent.

I’ll leave it to you to explain to your friends why you’ve started speaking strangely.

 

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28th February 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COMPTON BISHOP and the second of three pages for TETBURY in the Cotswolds.

Compton Bishop lies in a cleft in the Mendips below Crook peak (called Ridges Tor in 1068 and used as a beacon site in the 1580’s). The estate of Compton was owned by the Bishops of Winchester until 904 when it was surrendered to King Edward the Elder. The nearby Webbington Hotel & Leisure Club was converted and extended from Webbington House, built in 1908 by Herman Alexander Tiarks.

There are more details on this weeks' update on the blog along with a request for local viewers to help this website.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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21st February 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - EAST WOODLANDS and the first of three pages for TETBURY in the Cotswolds in GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

East Woodlands is situated on the edge of the Longleat Estate, adjacent to woods and fields. There is very little there, aside from the church and the Horse & Groom public house. There is something quite idylic about the place though.

The Market Hall in Tetbury was built in 1655 and is considerred one of the finest of its type in the Cotswolds. Tetbury is also home to the Prince of Wales at Highgrove, which was built in the last few years of the 18th century. Tetbury is the largest town in the area that is correctly termed as the Southwolds.

I am aware of a number of new visitors to this website following the feature on BBC Somerset last week (Click here to visit). Welcome to Somerset3d. I hope you enjoy touring around the county and visiting places that you may not have heard about before. Please feel free to drop me a line (click here to email me) should you wish to comment or ask questions about the website.

There are more details on the blog with what I'm up to along with more information about this weeks updates.

 

Source: The Visitor's Guide to the Cotswolds by Richard Sale . Buy Somerset Books.

 

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14th February 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CROSS.

Cross is a hamlet which, until the 1840’s, was of considerable importance as a coach stop for changing horses on the main road between Bristol and Exeter. The hamlet is now bypassed by the straightening of the main road.

BBC Somerset requested a selection of my 3D pictures to feature on their website. They have already put them to good use by creating a slideshow that you can view by clicking here.

Just a reminder that you can download the WoollyAnaglyph Maker by clicking here.

More information on the blog.

 

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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7th February 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LOVINGTON.

Lovington is a small lias-stone village west of Castle Cary and between the rivers Brue and Cary. Charity Farm was acquired in 1743 by the Wells Archdeaconry Charity for widows and children of deceased clergy.

You can download the WoollyAnaglyph Maker by clicking here.

Visit the blog for more information.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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31st January 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - PYLLE.

The name Pylle (pronounced pill) means creek or haven. Centuries ago, when central Somerset was under water, and Glastonbury an island, the first settlement here was on the shoreline. The original village has disappeared, probably wiped out by the Black Death plague. One half of the village (shown in the photographs) is still based around the village pond, including the church; the other half is a mile east on the Fosse Way. The village hall used to be the school and records of 1875 state that the schoolmaster complained that his 58 pupils were distracted from their lessons by the passing traffic, except when the windows frosted over. Numbers dropped so much that in 1958, with only 14 pupils, the school closed.

Late news. You can now download the custom made WoollyAnaglyph Maker free of charge by clicking here. There is also a link at the top of the page and you can also access it by going to the FAQ's and clicking on the link HOW CAN I MAKE ANAGLYPHS?

A BIG thanks to a good friend, Phil Hand, for putting the work in for me and coming up with, what I think is, the best anaglyph maker on the net.

More information available on the blog.

Source:The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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24th January 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - CATCOTT and STOW-ON-THE-WOLD in GLOUCESTERSHIRE is now available in GALLERY 2.

Catcott sits on the northern slopes of the Polden Hills and is on the course of an ancient trackway dating to almost 3,000 BC. Catcott Heath, only 10ft above sea level, is an area of outstanding botanical interest and is closely watched over by Conservation groups. A headless man, said to be the Duke of Monmouth, haunts a house in the village, where Monmouth is reputed to have stayed just before the Battle of Sedgemoor.

All the roads in Gloucestershire seem to lead to Stow-on-the-Wold. It's market received the Royal Grant in 1107. The stocks are still displayed on the green and many visitors have gone home with photographs of their friends and family 'locked' in them. It is one of the highest towns in the Cotswolds and is an excellent example of true Cotswold life.

More information available on the blog.

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Gloucestershire Village Book by the Gloucestershire Federation of Women's Institues. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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17th January 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - ALFORD and the COTSWOLD MOTOR MUSEUM on the BOURTON-ON-THE-WATER page is now available to view in GALLERY 2.

North of the main part of Alford village lies the un-restored Perpendicular church of All Saints, its west tower crowned with a little pyramid roof.  Looking east from the church affords a view of Alford House, built by John Thring (died 1834) and subsequently the home of his many descendants including the Preb Godfrey Thring (died 1903) hymn writer and builder of Hornblotten church and Rear Admiral George Thring (died 2001).

More information available on the blog.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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10th January 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WATCHET and BOURTON-ON-THE-WATER in GLOUCESTERSHIRE in GALLERY 2.

Watchet is an appealing small town & port with narrow winding streets, an attractive series of small shops and several old inns. The former Market House has housed the Museum since 1979 with displays illustrating the town's past. This is the harbour from which Coleridge’s ill-fated Ancient Mariner set sail, ‘below the kirk, below the hill’: a poem which tradition claims was begun in the Bell inn in Market Street. Watchet was the most important seaport in Saxon Somerset with Viking raids recorded in 917, 987-8 and 997. Legend has it that Lady Florence Wyndham, who had died and been buried with valuable jewels and rings on her fingers, came back to life when a greedy sexton opened her coffin and tried to file a ring from her finger. The sexton fled, the Lady arose from her grave and walked back to her home.

Most of the old houses in Bourton-on-the-Water were built of local stone during the 16th & 17th centuries.The oldest public house is the Old New inn which has a sundial marked 1712. The pub gardens are the home of the model village (See link on the village page). The bridges for which 'The Venice of the Cotswold' has become famous were built between the 17th & 20th centuries. The village is also home to the Cotswold Motor Museum which, in turn, is the home of Brum.

More information available on the blog.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush

and The Gloucestershire Village Book by the Gloucestershire Federation of Women's Institues. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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3rd January 2008

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WEST QUANTOXHEAD.

West Quantoxhead stands between the sea and the head of the Quantock hills, as its name suggests. The little village that stood here was progressively demolished in the early part of the 19th century. The manor-house of St Audries was held by the Cauntelo family in the 13th century and then, for 350 years, until 1736, by the Malet family. In 1835 it was bought by the triple barrelled Sir Peregrine Fuller-Palmer-Acland for his daughter Isabel (or Isabella) and her husband, Sir Alexander Acland-Hood.

More information available on the blog.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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27th December 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COLFORD.

Coal was worked at Coleford from medieval times and continued until the closure of the last pit in 1927. Newbury House was occupied by the Moore family until 1760, when their heiress married in to the Paget family. At the west end of the village lies the remains of an aqueduct, built to carry the Somerset & Dorset Canal, a project abandoned around 1800.

Visit the blog for some Christmas cheer and nonsense.

I hope you all have a fun and joyful new year.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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20th December 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - MOORLINCH and WINCHESTER in HAMPSHIRE added in GALLERY 2.

Moorlinch is situated on the Polden Hills. Its name is thought to mean ‘Pleasant hill’ from the Saxon myrge and hlinc. The church of St Mary stands on an elevated site with superb views to the south over the levels.

Winchester was formerly the capital of England, during the 10th and early 11th centuries, and before that the capital of Wessex. Winchester Cathedral, the second longest cathedral in Europe, was originally built in 1079. and is the place of interment of numerous Bishops of Winchester (such as William of Wykeham), Anglo-Saxon monarchs (such as Egbert of Wessex) and later monarchs such as King Canute and William Rufus, as well as Jane Austen. This information is taken directly from the WIKIPEDIA entry for the city and for more information and live links I recommend that you visit the website to read the piece in full. You can do so by clicking here.

This week's blog will give you more information on my trip to Winchester and some thoughts for the coming week.

Happy Christmas to one and all.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Wikipedia. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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13th December 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - AXBRIDGE.

Axbridge stands at the foot of the Mendip Hills and the name suggests that it was founded to control a crossing of the river Axe. On the west side of the Square, the former market place, stands a three storey merchant’s house known as King John’s Hunting Lodge. Dating from the late 15th century it served as the King’s Head Inn by 1645 until the mid 18th century but has no known connection with King John. Rescued by the National Trust it now hosts the local museum.

Don't forget that the blog will give you more information about what I'm up to and give you a chance to leave comments .

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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6th December 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STOGUMBER and the last instalment of the MONACO special is now available for viewing.

Stogumber lies between the Quantocks and the Brendon Hills. Three rebels from the Taunton area were hanged in the village in 1685 after the Monmouth Rebellion. Stogumber Brewery was established around 1840 by George Elers and it’s Medicinal Pale Ale, produced with waters from the nearby Harry Hill’s well, earned a widespread reputation. Brewing ceased around 1910 with the buildings demolished in 1973.

This is the last week of Monaco pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Keep an eye on the blog for news of future specials.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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29th November 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BLACKFORD and the penultimate page of the MONACO special is now available for your viewing pleasure.

This Blackford is the one situated on the levels near to Wedmore rather than the one near to Wincanton. The Holy Trinity Church was built in 1826 as a chapel of ease, to save the people the long walk into Wedmore.

As you can see I couldn't find out much about Blackford. Do you know more? Do you live in Blackford and know of something about the village that you think others would find interesting? Well now you can share the information via the blog. Just click on the comments link and you can leave your information for all to see.

Source: The Somerset Larders website. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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22nd November 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - COTHELSTONE and the eighth page of the MONACO special is now ready for viewing.

Cothelstone sits on the south western slopes of the Quantock Hills. There isn't a village as such: only the old manor house, church, farm and a few cottages. Its name means ‘Cuthwulf’s settlement’. The original manor house was the home of the Stawell family. Sir John Stawell was one of King Charles I most loyal supporters and raised a small army, at his own expense, with weapons reputedly stored in the church tower at Bishops Lydeard. He was to pay dearly for his principles, being imprisoned, tried wrongfully for treason and murder and locked in the Tower of London from 1650. His home was partially demolished, his forests were cut down and his land sold. He died in 1662, shortly after the Restoration, and Charles II conferred the title Baron Stawell on his son Ralph in 1683.

Click here for the blog for further information on what I'm up to and for you to make comments about Somerset3d.

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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15th November 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - LEIGH-UPON-MENDIP and the seventh page of the MONACO special is now ready for viewing.

Leigh (pronounced as Lye) -on-Mendip stands 700 feet up in the heart of the Mendip Hills. In 1857 the parson, G. A. Mahon, was shot by a villager when in the pulpit of the 15th century church of St Giles. The villager in question being upset by the vicar’s criticism of drunkenness. Fortunately Mr Mahon was only slightly injured but his assailant was imprisoned for two years.

Don't forget to check out the blog for further information. It's still early days for it at the moment but I do intend to use it to supply you with extra information about Somerset, this website, and my activities as the weeks go by.

Source:The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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8th November 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - HAWKRIDGE and the sixth instalment of the MONACO special is now available for viewing.

Hawkridge clings to the hillside above a tributary of the River Barle.  It was one of the two locations for the annual Swainmote Courts, which regulated the moor. This was held in the local churchyard. Today the annual high spot is the Hawkridge Revel, held on August Bank Holiday at Zeal Farm. Hawkridge still has one person whose business is carving items from deer antlers. The ‘Antler Man’ at Hawkridge is worth a visit, to see what can be produced from antlers found in the forest.

BREAKING NEWS: I have just started a blog that will compliment this web site. It will provide information on the latest updates and up and coming projects relating to the web site and my photography in general. It will also be an easy way for you to leave comments about the site, ask questions and find out more about me. You can find it by clicking here.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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1st November 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - BISHOPS LYDEARD, more pictures added at STRATTON-ON-THE-FOSSE and the fifth instalment of the MONACO special is now ready for viewing.

Bishops Lydeard is a trim village of stone and thatched cottages and is situated in the Vale of Taunton. The almshouses date from 1616 and have been restored but still retain their mullioned windows. The West Somerset Railway, Britain’s longest privately preserved railway, operates between the village and Minehead.

Stratton-on-the-Fosse is situated on the Roman Fosse Way between Radstock and Shepton Mallet. Its church, dedicated to St Vigor, is one of just two in Britain to honour the 6th century saint (The other is in Fulborne, near Cambridge) who was much revered by the Romans. He was the Bishop of Bayeux from AD 513-537. The main attraction in the village is Downside Abbey. The Benedictines originated in Douai in Flanders in 1607, came to England in 1795 and acquired the Downside estate in 1814. New buildings were added as the famous school grew to become one of the leading Catholic schools in the country.

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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25th October 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - STREET and the fourth page of the MONACO special is now available for viewing.

Street is famous for its connection to the shoe industry most notably via the Quaker family of Clark. A major tannery was founded around 1810 by Arthur Clothier, who took as his apprentice (and from 1821, partner) Cyrus Clark. In 1825 Cyrus set up his own business producing sheepskin rugs, taking his brother James as an apprentice. James introduced the manufacture of woollen slippers called Brown Petersburgs, and later boots and welted shoes. The first factory building was put up in 1829 and thus C. & J. Clark was born. Today the company is still family owned and with the Clarks Shopping Village, the first purpose-built outlet shopping village in the UK, attracting around three million visitors a year, their future looks to continue for many years to come.

 

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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18th October 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SPAXTON and the third installment of the MONACO special is now available for viewing.

Spaxton’s name derives from a Scandinavian settler who gave his name to ‘Spak’s tun’ long before the conquest of 1066. In the village stands the house and former chapel of the Agapemone – The Abode of Love, founded in 1846 by the Rev Henry James Prince. The unfrocked curate of Carlinch, who had publicly declared himself in Weymouth Assembly Rooms as the ‘Son of Man and immortal’. Addressed as ‘Beloved’ by his followers he gathered around him a host of besotted women, his ‘Soul Brides’, and fleeced them of their fortunes to support his luxurious life style. In 1856 to the strains of organ music he deflowered a young virgin before the altar in the presence of a congregation, which included his own wife and the girl’s mother. Prince claimed that the Devil was responsible for the resulting child. The farce continued long after the ‘immortal’ Prince died (in 1899) with the commune eventually being dissolved in 1958 and the buildings sold.

 

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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11th October 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SHAPWICK , more pictures have been added at ILMINSTER and the second installment of the MONACO special is now available for viewing.

Shapwick rests on the northern slopes of the Polden Hills. It was once a stopover point for pilgrims on their way to and from Glastonbury Abbey. One such pilgrim was St Indractus. Returning to Ireland with his sister after a pilgrimage to Rome. They were spotted by servants of King Ina whilst they were paying homage at St Patrick’s tomb at the Abbey. The servants mistook their brass-topped staffs for rods of gold and their sacks of seeds for bags of booty. They were followed and murdered at Shapwick and their bodies were thrown into a pit. It is said that a heavenly light shone over the pit for 3 days and nights, and when the King learned of the atrocity he had them buried at Glastonbury.

Ilminster was devastated by a fire; it is claimed, in 1491. An event only recorded by Collinson in 1791. The fire of 1661 that destroyed nearly 30 houses in the town is better authenticated. In 1680, on his progress through the west, the Duke of Monmouth twice passed through the town. Charles Speke shook the Dukes hand in the market place during another visit in 1865, an event that was to cost him his life after Judge Jeffrey’s Bloody Assizes. At least 57 Ilminster men joined the rebellion although of the 12 later hanged, drawn and quartered in the market place, only Charles Speke came from the town.

 

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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4th October 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SIMONSBATH and the first installment of the MONACO special.

Simonsbath is the most westerly village in Somerset. It is attractively situated in a well wooded combe and is a haven for anyone who enjoys the unspoilt countryside. In 1858 the small village was the scene of a tragic murder. William Burgess killed his little daughter Anne because he could not afford the 2s 6d (12.5 pence or about 18 Euro Cents) a week for her lodging. The body was only found after the abandoned shaft of a nearby copper mine was drained.

This week see's the first of a 10 week (Yes TEN week!) special on MONACO. Regular visitors to this web site will know that my lovely wife recently showed me around her one-time hometown. These pictures are the result of that visit. I hope you enjoy them.

It’s October and that means it’s our 2nd anniversary. I’d like to say a big THANK YOU to all of you for continuing to help make running this web site worthwhile. The site continues to gain in popularity with more than double the amount of visitors compared with this time last year (5181 hits for November 2006 - 10854 hits for November 2007 – source www.1&1.com). Plans for the coming year are to release a book of Somerset in 3d and to include more features into the site. News about these will appear in the NEWS section on the INFO page as soon as they are ready. Again, thank you for your support.

 

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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27th September 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - DULCOTE and the final installment of this month's DISNEYLAND PARIS special.

The name Dulcote has existed for at least a thousand years. The name appears in an Anglo-Saxon charter, dated May 1065, which transfers this land with other areas around Wells from King Edward The Confessor to the Bishop of Wells. In the latter part of the 17th century and for the next 200 years paper was manufactured in the village. The paper was rag-based, made from discarded linen clothing. Dulcote fountain is said to be around 150 years old. It has been created from the overflow from the springs, which supplies water to the village. These natural springs have an average flow of 100,000 gallons (454,609 litres) per day. They are categorized as “petrified springs” because of the materials high concentration of calcium hydrogen carbonate dissolved in the water. The height of the fountain has increased over the years because the minerals have built up on the rock surface.

Source: The excellent web site Historical Sketches. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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20th September 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - MARK and the third installment of this month's DISNEYLAND PARIS special.

The name Mark has been written many ways through the ages, including Mercern and Merkerun. The name means boundary home. The village is located on the edge of a flooded marsh and at the end of a higher ridge that runs through Mark, Blackford, Wedmore, Panborough and Wells: each of which were islets. The Pack Horse Inn was important to the wool merchants of the Mendip Hills who transported their wares through Mark on their way to the ports at Highbridge and of the Bristol Channel. They stopped at the inn to change horses, and to pick up wool from the sheep grazing on the lowlands.

Source:The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Women's Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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13th September 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WITHYPOOL and the second installment of this month's DISNEYLAND PARIS special.

Withypool was the home of Walter Raymond, one of Somerset’s favourite writers who was born in Yeovil in 1852. From his cottage here he wrote of the crafts and characters that he knew and loved so well. The village is in a remote spot and it is said that there were four harvests a year – snow, frost, rain and muck. During the 14th century, English author Geoffrey Chaucer was in charge of the village in his duties as forrester of North Petherton. The presence of Bronze Age man is marked by a 120ft stone circle on Withypool Hill.

I'm looking for information on Blackford. This is the Blackford situated near Wedmore rather than the one near Wincanton. If any of you can supply me with anything interesting about the village then please email me. Thank you.

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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6th September 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - SOUTH BREWHAM and the first installment of this month's DISNEYLAND PARIS special.

South Brewham was held, in 1066, by one of Edward the Confessor’s favourites, Robert, son of Wimarc the Staller. After the Conquest the manor and the church were granted to William de Mohun of Dunster (after clicking on the link scroll down to the heading ' MANORS AND OTHER ESTATES' for information on William and Robert). The church of St John the Baptist holds a brass signed by Wincanton bellfounder William Cockey, one of very few autographed brasses in Somerset.

As promised, this weeks update includes the first of four instalments for Disneyland Paris. Because of the way anaglyphs work I had to get rid of the colour red that was in the pictures. I did this by either replacing the red with another colour, usually blue, or by reducing the saturation of the red to a softer colour that wouldn't be as troublesome to the eye. So if you were there in June, wearing red and think that you may be in the picture, look for blue or a pastel red instead and you may be lucky.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

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30th August 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WINSFORD. (update - link fixed)

For many Winsford is the prettiest village on Exmoor, it derives it's name from the ford over the Win Brook. Winsford's most famous inhabitant is Ernest Bevin. Born here in 1881 he became a Member of Parliament and, after the Second World War, Foreign Secretary. The church was renovated in the 15th century but retains some of it's Norman features.

Throughout September, I will be featuring 3d images of DISNEYLAND PARIS following a family holiday there in June. The resort is celebrating it's 15th Anniversary this year.

Sources:The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Womens Institute. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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23rd August 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - FARLEIGH HUNGERFORD.

Farleigh Hungerford is pleasantly situated on the banks of the river Frome. The name Farleigh is thought to have been derived from ‘fair meadows’. Until 1347 the village was in the possession of the Montfort family and their name was added as a suffix. After many other owners the Hungerford family took ownership and changed the suffix to Hungerford. Sir Thomas Hungerford, First Speaker of the House of Commons, rebuilt the manor house in substantial fortified style. His son, the first Lord Hungerford, improved and expanded the estate, claiming the village church as a private family chapel in the process. Another church was built in the 15th century for the villagers. The Hungerfords served under Henry V at Agincourt and occupied prestigious positions in the reign of Henry VI. In 1822 a Roman villa with fine tessellated floors was discovered here.

I'm really sorry about the late update this week. My lovely wife had planned a surprise four day break in Monte-Carlo and we didn't get back until really late last night. It was to celebrate our first wedding anniversary, she also wanted to show me where she used to live. Needless to say I took the opportunity to take some 3d pictures for you to view at a later date. Have a good weekend.

 

Sources: Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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16th August 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - WEST COMPTON and more pictures added at LANGPORT.

West Compton is one of those hidden places that you will not find without looking. A ‘Compton’ was originally ‘a valley enclosure’ and its meaning was later broadened to a medium size but somewhat valuable possession.

There was a mint at Langport from circa 930 until the 11th century and the place formed one of the Saxon forts mentioned in the early 10th century Burghal Hidage. Royal charters were granted in 1563, which confirmed a Saturday market and established three fairs. The town was a significant trading centre from Saxon times, relying on river traffic up the Parrett from Bridgewater. In the 18th century a trading company was founded by George Stuckey and Thomas Bagehot, with wharves on the Parrett by the Great Bow Bridge. By 1866 the firm owned 14 East Indiamen and 19 barges and later developed into the Somerset Trading Company. The company spawned Stuckey’s Bank which absorbed 13 other banks, mainly in Somerset, before itself being taken over in 1909. At that time Stuckey’s had a banknote circulation second only to the Bank of England. Water-borne trade decreased with the arrival of the railway in 1853. The Hanging Chapel (Shown in picture 6) that stands above an arch across a road probably dates from the 15th century and was apparently used for illegal Catholic masses in Edward VI’s reign. Referred to as the Hawninge Chapel in 1575 it served successively as the town hall (1596-1600), Langport Grammar School (1706-1790), a militia arms store (1809-1816), a Sunday school (1818-1827), a museum (1834-1875) and to house the local Freemasons’ Lodge (1891 to date). In the grounds of the church of All Saints is the grave of Langports most celebrated son, the world-famous economist Walter Bagehot (1826-1877). In the Civil War the town was garrisoned for the King in 1643. In 1645 the Royalists were defeated at the Battle of Langport. Three Monmouth rebels were executed here in 1685.

Another web site has been recently launched with an aim to help promote the lesser known town & villages and their events. Here is their mission statement taken from their site:

hiddensomerset.com is a website designed to share the 'bits the others can't reach' (to acknowledge a well known old advert). This website opens up an enormous variety of little known gems across the county, where you are most unlikely ever to meet a coach load of tourists. Explore Somerset's more interesting historic, geographical and cultural features, the things which make our county so special and unique.

It is a good compliment to this web site I think. Click here to visit and don't forget to bookmark it in your favourites.

 

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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9th August 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - TARR STEPS.

Tarr Steps spans the river Barle in Exmoor, and is one of the finest clapper bridges in the country. At 180ft long with 17 spans, its date has been the subject of much debate. In the early 1900’s it was thought to have been built sometime in the Bronze Age, but today it is considered to be of medieval origin.

My wife and I visited the area last weekend. Although I don’t make a habit to personally endorse anything, I can highly recommend that you visit Tarr Farm , the local riverside inn and restaurant. Due to an incident with a set of car keys and a locked car door, I can also recommend that an overnight stay is well worth it. Both the food and the service were excellent. The hosts Richard Benn & Judy Carless and their staff could not have been more helpful. You don’t have to take my word for it though. Click here to read an article about the place by Paddy Burt from the Telegraph newspaper. Thanks also to the RAC man who eventually turned up to rescue my embarrassment and my car keys.

 

Sources:Sources: Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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2nd August 2007

NEW LOCATION ADDED - FOSTER YEOMAN and more photos added at WHATLEY. I have also fixed the BALTONSBOROUGH page. Thank you to those who brought it to my attention.

Although not a village, I felt that Foster Yeoman’s Torr Works quarry and Merehead railway sidings ought to have its own entry. This is where I work, at Mendip Rail Ltd, and so have access to the views shown in the photographs. The premises are not open to the public but visits can be arranged. Have a look at their web site for further details. I have linked the Marston House page to this one, as it is where the main offices are based for the company. The Foster Yeoman company was bought out by Holcim late in 2006. For more information about Foster Yeoman click here.

There has been a settlement at Whatley at least since Roman times. In AD 940 the manor was granted by King Edmund to the monks of Glastonbury. Now Whatley is a small village, dominated by the tower of the Norman church of St George. To the north of the village is the Hanson owned limestone quarry.

 

Sources:Sources: The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Womens Institute and Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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26th July 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - TRUDOXHILL.

Trudoxhill is noted for its early Congregational chapel, set beside the road at the bottom of the village, with an adjoining graveyard. It began as a home for Richard Newport and his wife and was converted into a chapel in 1717. After many years of decay it has recently been restored and is back in use as a chapel.

The name means ‘the tree on the dark hill’ from the Old English ‘treow’ (tree), ‘dox’ (dark) and ‘hyll’ (hill).

 

Sources: Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning and Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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19th July 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - OTHERY and more pictures added at EAST COKER.

Othery formed part of the Saxon estate of Sowi, held by Glastonbury Abbey until the dissolution of 1539. Its low lying lands were progressively drained by the monks. In 1317 Matthew de Clevedon, Lord of Aller, with a gang of 13 other men, broke down the abbey’s banks in the village and flooded 1,000 acres of crops for two years. Nearby is Pathe House, built circa 1800, the birthplace of the Victorian hero of Rorke’s Drift, Colonel J.R.M. Chard, VC.

The buccaneer, explorer and hydrographer William Dampier hails from East Coker. He was born in a cottage known as Hymerford House in 1651. He was the navigator aboard the ship that rescued Alexander Selkirk, the castaway on whom Daniel Defoe based Robinson Crusoe. William went on to circumnavigate the world three time, was the first explorer to explore the north-west coast of Australia and had a strait and an archipelago named after him.

 

Sources: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Book of Somerset Villages by Sheila Bird. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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12th July 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WITHAM FRIARY.

Witham Friary was one of the earliest institutions of the Carthusian Order founded in this country. It was formed by King Henry II in 1181 in part expiation for the murder of Archbishop Thomas à Becket. The first monks came from the south of France and found both the place and the people hostile.

 

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Bishop and Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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5th July 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CHELWOOD and pictures of THE COTSWOLD SHOW of 2005 in GLOUCESTERSHIRE added to the

CIRENCESTER page.

Meaning ‘the hill farm’ Chelwood is one of the Thankful Villages in Somerset. A phrase associated with Arthur Mee in the 1930’s referring to villages whose men and women all returned safely from the First World War.

This years Cotswold Fair starts this saturday (7th July). There are plenty of things to see and do, well worth a visit. Their official web site will tell you more. Fingers crossed that the weather will be good.

I've added a few films to the book store. HOT FUZZ is a recent release and was shot mainly in the city of Wells in Somerset. The same location was used for the BBC's period production of HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT and there are also scenes set in Mells. There are also three GLASTONBURY FESTIVAL films to peruse. Happy shopping.

 

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Bishop and I Never Knew That About England by Christopher Winn. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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26th June 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - TEMPLE CLOUD.

Most place names with ‘Temple’ relate to the Knights Templars, a religious military order whos original purpose was to protect pilgrims en route to the Holy Land. In the 14th century the order was suppressed on the command of Pope Clement V. the charge was heresy and the many estates held by the Templars were confiscated with terrifying vigour and appalling greed. The name ‘Cloud’ is thought to be the personal name Cloda.

As you can see it's an early update this week as I'm in France for a short break. I was in Vivegnis, Belgium, at the weekend with my family for the wedding of Michael Valle Rolland to Lara Jochems. Our best wishes go out to them. Next weeks update will be on Thursday as normal.

 

Source: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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21st June 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - TYTHERINGTON.

Tytherington means ‘The tithing enclosure’ from the Old English teopian and tun. A tithing was a grant made by 10 householders living near together and bound over as sureties for each other’s peaceable behaviour.

Upcoming updates are Temple Cloud, Chelwood and Witham Friary. As you can see from above information is scarce on some locations so any information you have will be most appreciated. You can email me by clicking here.

 

Source: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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14th June 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - COMPTON DANDO and more pictures added at WEST COKER.

There is a piece of Bath in Compton Dando. Built in the north east buttress of the chancel is a piece of Roman sculpture, a figure of Jupiter, and now recognised as part of the great alter from the Temple in Bath.

West Coker had a long tradition of growing hemp and flax for sailcloth manufacture, supplying Bridport as early as 1356. The village still possess the 19th century buildings of the West of England Twine Works and ‘Coker Canvas’ was highly prized by naval captains during the Napoleonic wars.

 

Sources: Somerset & Avon by Robert Dunning and Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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7th June 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CHELYNCH.

Chelynch means ‘The hill ridge’ from the Old English ceol (hill) and hlinc (ridge). It is a small but attractive location on the edge of Doulting. The local pub, The Poacher's Pocket, frequently has events such as art displays & cider festivals. Nearby, is the quarry where the cream coloured stone that built Wells Cathedral came from.

Pictures from this web site have been featured in KNUTTZ.NET. This is an image based blog web site that is updated daily with a selection of photographs and links to interest everyone. Click on the name above to see for yourself.

 

Source: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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31st May 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - PUBLOW.

Publow anciently belonged to the St Loes of Newton, and later came into the hands of the Hungerfords along with Compton Dando. The manor having many owners Henry Hastings (Third Earl Becher (c1517-1570)), Sir John Popham, Sir Francis Popham.

It is close to the route of the ancient Wansdyke. The name Publow is believed to mean 'The public meadow' from the Latin publicus and the Old English leah.

The impression left by my visit is that the land around Publow and the surrounding villages is abundant with water. It seems that, whatever direction you take, you are not far away from the sound of a stream or river rushing over exposed rocks. Because of this, it is a very green place. Lush fields and meadows crisscrossed by streams and rivers with narrow bridges built over them.

 

Source: Wikipedia. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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24th May 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HORNBLOTTON.

The name Hornblotton means ‘The trumpeter’s enclosure’ from the Old English ‘hornblawere’ and ‘tun’. One idea as to the origin of the name is that horns were blown at this location to let people know that the surrounding levels (prone to flooding) were safe to cross, another is that the Saxon lord may have been given it in return for leading the King’s hunt. The church of St Peter stands at the end of a country lane. Completed in 1874, to the designs of Sir T. G. Jackson, by the wealthy rector Preb Godfrey Thring. The interior is decorated using a technique known as sgraffito. Two layers of different colour plaster are laid on the walls and then the top layer is carved to reveal the layer below. It is probably the only church interior of its kind in the country. In the tower Thring placed an electric striking clock, the first of its kind when installed in 1883. In 1984 the clock mechanism was removed to the Science Museum in London for restoration and exhibition.

Some of the above information has been taken from the web site of one time Hornblotton resident Phil Merryman. Click here to visit Phil’s site and click on the link for Hornblotton for more information on the village. Thanks to Phil for permission to use some of his material.

Publow, Chelynch and Compton Dando are forthcoming updates. Any information you'd like to share on these locations is most appreciated. You can email me by clicking here and remember to put the village name in the subject box and don't forget to name your sources.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and Phil Merryman. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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17th May 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - MARKSBURY.

The entry for Marksbury in the Domesday Book shows the village listed as Mercesberie, meaning ‘The boundary near the fortified hill’. The hill in question is Stantonbury in Wansdyke. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, is believed to be late 12th Century in origin but mainly from the 15th century. The tower is dated 1634.

Finding information about the villages can sometimes be difficult. Not every village or hamlet has a recorded past that's easy to find and I sometimes end up entering very little, as shown above. Next weeks update will be the village of HORNBLOTTON and if any viewers can provide me with any interesting information on the village, not forgetting to provide the source, I will gladly add it. Click here to email me. Please put HORNBLOTTON INFO in the subject box. Thank you.

Don't forget to check out the Somerset Books page.

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and Wikipedia . Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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10th May 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WOOLLARD.

With my surname matching the village name of Woollard I always wanted to find a connection to the place. Perhaps some long ago relative once owned it, or held a manor there & I’d discover that, for centuries, the locals had been searching in vain for the rightful owner. Alas, it was not to be. Where as the village name means ‘The wool yard’ from the Old English wull and geard, the surname has a different meaning.  There are two possible origins, both of which are Anglo-Saxon. The first possible source is from the Old English pre 7th Century personal name "Wulfweard", composed of the elements "wulf", wolf and "weard", meaning guardian, protector. The given name is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Wluuard" and "Vluuard", and was still used in its Middle English form of "Wol(f)ward" up until the 13th Century. The second origin for the modern surname, found as Wool(l)ard, Woolatt, Wollard, Woolward, Wolfarth, Wolford, Wolforth, Woolford(e) and Woolfoot, is from the locational surname "Wolford", deriving from the place so called in Warwickshire. I prefer to accept the first version.

Sources: Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and the web site The Internet Surname Database. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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3rd May 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - LOPEN.

Lopen, meaning ‘The infested enclosure’ from the Old English loppe and tun, was held by the Knights Templar from the early 13th Century and then by the Knights Hospitaller. The small church of All Saints dates from the 14th & 15th centuries and was much restored in the 19th century. From the 18th century the parish was noted for flax growing and for the production of linen, sailcloth and twine.

I have now signed up with Amazon. This will enable you to buy the books which I mention directly from this web site. I do get a small commission from each book sale and I'm hoping, with your help, that this will assist me in providing some of the running costs for this project. You can visit the page advertising the books by clicking here or by clicking on 'Buy Somerset Books' which will be highlighted after the list of books used for resources below. At the moment many of the books are advertised without an image of the book cover. I will be rectifying this over the next few weeks. Many thanks for your continued support.

Sources: Somerset the complete guide by Robin Bush & Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson. Buy Somerset Books.

 

 

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26th April 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HUNSTRETE and more pictures added at MONTACUTE.

In 936 Hunstrete was given to Glastonbury Abbey who held it for the next 600 years. The monks didn’t live here but managed the estate, principally for its timber, leasing the land and manor house to tenants. Fish were also farmed in a chain of six ponds that were situated to the north of the present lake. The abbey lost control of the village during the Reformation and it passed through the hands of various owners until the beginning of the 17th century when it was acquired by Sir John Popham, who was Lord Chief Justice to Queen Elizabeth 1st. As Lord Chief Justice he presided at the trials of Mary Queen of Scots, Sir Walter Raleigh and Guy Fawkes. The Pophams were to hold Hunstrete for the next 350 years.

The pointed hill (in Latin Mons Acutus) to the west of the village gives Montacute its name. Since 1760 it has been topped by a tower, built by the Phelips family. Sir Edward Phelips (died 1614) was responsible for the building of Montacute House (acquired by the National Trust in 1931s) and in his time he became the Master of the Rolls and the Speaker of the House of Commons.

 

Sources: Hunstrete House web site, The Somerset Village Book by Somerset Federation of Womens Institute & Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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19th April 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - KINGSTONE and CALAIS in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

In 940 King Edmund gave Kingstone to St Dunstan, the Abbot of Glastonbury. It then passed on to the Count of Mortain after the Norman Conquest. The Arundell family, later held the village from 1461 to 1663, before the Poulett family took control in 1663 to 1941.

Calais has long been an entry point for English travellers but relationships between Calais and England have not always been peaceful. The Calaisien pirates proved themselves a little too exuberant in their attacks against British merchant ships. On the 4th September 1346 Edward III laid siege on the town. Eleven months later, starving and abandoned by their king, the Calaisiens could not hold out much longer. So the Governor, Jean de Vienne, sent a message to Edward III telling him of his decision to surrender the town if everyone was granted a pardon. The King agreed on the condition that six of the most respected burghers, barefooted and with a noose around their necks, bring the keys of the town and the castle to him and beg for his mercy. When the inhabitants were informed of the conditions Eustache de Saint-Pierre, one of the richest businessmen, came forward and stated that he was ready to die for common good and to give himself up to the English. Another five burgers immediately followed his example. When the six hostages gave themselves up the Kings wife, Philipinne was so moved by pity that she intervened and obtained a pardon for the victims. A statue of the burgers, sculpted by Auguste Rodin, stands in front of the town hall.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Les Amis Du Vieux Calais, Calais Tourist Office.

 

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12th April 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STANTON PRIOR .

Stanton Prior is one of the seven Thankful Villages in Somerset. They were so named by Arthur Mee in the 1930’s. It refers to those villages whose men and women all returned safely from the First World War. Subsequently there are usually no war memorials in these villages but most of them have a stone or plaque of dedication in the local church as a way of giving thanks for their good fortune.

Source: I Never Knew That About England by Christopher Winn.

 

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5th April 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CRICKET MALHERBIE and more pictures added at HASELBURY PLUCKNETT.

Cricket Malherbie was called Crucet, or Cruchet, at the time of the 1086 Domesday Book, meaning ‘Little Hill’ from the Old English ‘Cric’. The attachment of Malherbie comes from the Malherbie family who took on the manor from the Montague family in the early 13th century. Further owners have included the lords Dinham, in the early 15th century, and Pitt, from the 17th to 20th centuries. The old Manor was succeeded by the present Cricket Court, built for Admiral Pitt circa 1820. Recent occupiers include the writer & historian Count Nikolai Tolstoy.

Haselbury means ‘Hazel Tree Hill’ or ‘Hazel Grove’ and Plucknett is a corruption of Alan de Plugenet, its medieval owner. It was one of the few manors that remained with its Saxon owner, Thane Brismar, after the Norman Conquest. St Wulfric, a hermit and former priest, took up residence in a cell in the church in 1125. He developed a widespread reputation for prophecy, second sight and healing and was visited by nobles, including Henry I, whose death he predicted, King Stephen and St Bernard of Clairvaux.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Women's Institute, Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson.

 

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29th March 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - PENSFORD.

Pensford was once a busy market town and woollen cloth manufacture was formerly carried out here. It was also an important staging post for stage coaches during the 17th & 18th centuries. The village contains many listed buildings, including the church of St Thomas A Beckett and the magnificent 95ft tall viaduct. Both buildings were closed due to flood damage after the River Chew burst its banks in 1968.

Sources: Genuki web site and Wikipedia.

 

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22nd March 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HINTON St GEORGE and SHAFTESBURY in DORSET added in GALLERY 2.

Hinton St George has been home to the Poulett family since the 15th century. The Duke of Monmouth came here during his 1685 Rebellion, and Elizabeth Parcet touched him for the Kings Evil. In the church of St George there are many effigies of the Poulett (or Paulet) family including Sir Hugh Poulett (died 1573), governor of the isle of Jersey and his son Sir Amias Poulett (died 1588), gaoler of Mary, Queen of Scots.

The height of the land at Shaftesbury has been the determining factor in its history. The Saxons first established a hilltop settlement here, keen on it’s strategic position. King Alfred defended the town for the same reason in the 9th century. It was because he was so sure of its geographical position that he founded the Abbey here for his daughter, Ethelgiva, in 888.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Womens Institute, Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Shaftesbury & District Community Site.

 

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15th March 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - DOWLISH WAKE and more pictures added at NORTON St PHILIP.

Dowlish Wake is a picture-book village formerly called East Dowlish. Its present suffix comes from the family of Ralph Wake, lord of the manor in the 12th century, ancestor in turn to the Kaynes and Speke families. In the church of St Andrew is the tomb of John Hanning Speke (died 15th September 1864), the explorer who discovered the source of the Nile. Dr Livingston was in attendance at his funeral. The last Union Flag to fly in Ginga, Uganda, was sent to hang in the church at the time of their independence in 1962.

Norton St Philip is a former clothing village, its name meaning ‘the northern settlement, or enclosure’ with the addition of the parish church’s dedication. It was long known as Philips Norton. Inside the church, under the tower, stands an effigy of the two heads of the ‘fair maids of Foxcote’. These are reputed to have been Siamese twins, joined at the stomach, and were noted by Samuel Pepys when he visited Norton in 1668.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Womens Institute & Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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8th March 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP.

Shepton Beauchamp (pronounced ‘Beecham’) is almost unique in that it has an old Fives court wall, only seven of which are left in Somerset. The original game was said to have been first played against church walls but, to protect them, individual Fives walls were built. The name of Beauchamp derives from the family that held the manor from the mid 12th century until the death of John De Beauchamp in 1361.

Source: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Womens Institute.

 

 

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1st March 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - MIDSOMER NORTON and pictures of St JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH in CIRENCESTER, GLOUCESTER added in GALLERY 2.

A pleasant mixture of old and new Midsomer Norton’s excellent shopping facilities blend attractively with its Georgian houses, 12th century Priory House and late Medieval Tithe barn. The latter an imposing building which was converted into a Roman Catholic church in the early 20th century.

Often called ‘the Cathedral of the Cotswolds’, St John the Baptist church is one of the largest and most elegant Medieval churches in the county. It is notable for its numerous chapels. The Trinity chapel is the largest but the Lady Chapel has the most elaborate tomb, that of Humfry Bridges and his wife. The recumbent effigies were sculpted by local craftsman Samuel Baldwin.

Sources: The Hidden places of Somerset and the web site Britain Express.

 

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22nd February 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - KINGSBURY EPISCOPI and more pictures added at EAST QUANTOXHEAD.

Kingsbury Episcopi translates as Kings Hill of the Bishop. This was one of the holdings of Giso, the last Saxon Bishop of Wells. He had owned this land before 1066 and retained it until his death in 1089. The village is situated on the edge of the moors or wetlands, a wonderful expanse of winding droves, withy beds and patchwork fields, a conservationist’s dream in plant and wildlife.

East Quantoxhead forms a triangle running from its low cliffs on the shore up to a point at Black Ball Hill on the Quantock Hills. Many Bronze-Age burials, mostly on the high ground, testify to a prehistoric settlement. This is also the parish where the mouth painter Sarah Biffin was born in 1784.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Place Names by Stephen Robinson and The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Womens Institute.

 

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15th February 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WESTBURY-SUB-MENDIP and BEG-MEIL in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

Westbury-sub-Mendip is a village that is stretched out along the road from Cheddar to Wells (A371) and rises up the green Mendip slope. Excavations in a quarry face above the village revealed worked flints assigned to the Middle Pleistocene period (c 500,000 bc), claimed by some as the earliest evidence of Man in Britain.

The shores of Beg-meil caress the Atlantic ocean on the southern coast of Brittany. Situated just over 3 miles (5km) from Fouesnant it was formally a fashion resort.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Wonderful Finistere by Michel Renouard & Daniel Mingant .

 

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8th February 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CREWKERNE and STOURHEAD in WILTSHIRE added in GALLERY 2.

There was a Saxon mint at Crewkerne in the early 11th century, also a market by 1086 and a fair from the 1270’s. The town’s textile trade was rejuvenated in the 18th century when the availability of locally grown flax led to an expansion in the manufacture of sailcloth and canvas webbing. Among the many thousands of sails to be made here were those for HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Stourhead garden was created by Henry Hoare II (1705-85) in the 1740’s. The river Stour was dammed to form a great lake and around the lake, Hoare laid out a landscape garden to entrance his guests. He was only 19 when he inherited the family banking business and moved to Stourhead after his mothers’ death in 1741. Such was the accomplishment of this wondrous garden that Henry Hoare II became known as ‘Henry the Magnificent’. Today Stourhead is owned by the National Trust and is essentially the same as Henry II’s vision – a self-contained and timeless masterpiece.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and The Hidden Places of Somerset & The National Trust.

 

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1st February 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - EAST CRANMORE and more pictures added at MULCHELNEY.

East Cranmore was inhabited earlier than west Cranmore. The Paget family were Lords of the Manor from the 1790’s until the 1950’s and resided at Cranmore Hall. Now, this grand building is the home of All Hallows School, a Roman Catholic preparatory boarding school that moved to its present home from Devon in 1946. In the hills behind the hall stands East Mendip Tower, now known as Cranmore Tower. Now a private residence it was built by John Moore Paget in 1863-65 to designs drawn up by Thomas Wyatt. During the 2nd World War both the Home Guard and the Armed Forces used the tower as an observation post. The Tower is not open to the public.

There is evidence, in the form of a charter that suggests Ine, King of Wessex Saxons 688-726, probably founded Mulchelney Abbey circa 693. History suggests that Danish raids caused much disruption leading to the Abbey being re-founded by King Athelstan (924-939). In 995 Ethelred the Unready confirmed the Manor of Ilminster to the Abbey, the original charter is now kept by the Somerset Records Office. Throughout the 16th century the Abbey was progressively demolished for building stone. In 1614 the Abbey was sold to Sir Edward Phelips of Montacute. After more changes of ownership English Heritage now administers the Abbey.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation Of Womens institute & Somerset, the Complete Guide by Robin Bush.

 

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25th January 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STONEY STRATTON and GLOUCESTER in GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

Stoney Stoke is a hamlet that has been established since the mid 11th century.  Formerly called Stoke Holloway, it is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. At this time Robert, count of Mortain, owned it. Before a bypass was built in 1831 it was originally on a principle route. At various times between the early 1800’s and the mid 20th century it contained two public houses, a Smithy and a school for 30 children.

Gloucester Cathedral tower has dominated the city skyline for 550 years. The Cathedral has a permanent team of stone masons who constantly maintain and repair this ancient structure. The Cathedral Cloisters were featured as the corridors of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry in the Harry Potter films.

Sources: British History Online and Living Gloucester.

 

 

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18th January 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CHARLTON MACKRELL and more pictures added at KILVE. Also SHERBORNE in DORSET, ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

Charlton Mackrell, sometimes called West Charlton, is a farmers’ settlement. Roman villa sites have been found north-west of the parish and quarrying has also revealed Roman burials. It was also in this village that Henry Adams was married, in 1609, long before he left for the New World in 1636. 

Kilve is situated on the coast at the northern end of the Quantock Hills. Between the car park and the beach stands a Grade II listed building that is a monument to a failed industry. It is an oil refining retort and in 1923 two companies were formed to exploit the oil found in the oil shale deposits along the north Somerset coast. Previous tests had suggested that there was over 200 million tons of oil shale with each ton producing 40 gallons of oil. In 1924 an experimental plant was built at Kilve only to discover that the oil yield was only 5-10 gallons per ton. The deeper mining that would be required to extract the better oil shale would prove to be disastrously uneconomical and so ended Somerset’s oil boom.   

The Saxons named Sherborne Scir Burne, meaning ‘the place of the clear stream’. They also made it the capital of Wessex. Two of King Alfred’s elder brothers, King Ethelbert and King Ethelbald, are buried within the impressive abbey. The town is full of historic interest with 17th, 18th and 19th century architecture set in unspoilt streets.

Source: Somerset The Complete Guide – Robin Bush., Curious Somerset by Derrick Warren and Sherborne Town web site.

 

 

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11th January 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STONEY STOKE and FOUESNANT in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

Stoney Stoke is a hamlet that has been established since the mid 11th century.  Formerly called Stoke Holloway, it is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. At this time Robert, count of Mortain, owned it. Before a bypass was built in 1831 it was originally on a principle route. At various times between the early 1800’s and the mid 20th century it contained two public houses, a Smithy and a school for 30 children.

Fouesnant is located on the southern coast of Brittany, on the mouth of a small river, thus explaining the origin of the name (Foën – “Brook in the valley” – in Breton). It is famous for its cider and also known for its traditional headdress and costumes, which are still worn during festivals. The church was built in the 12th century and modified in the next. The War Memorial was designed by the Breton artist René Quivillic.

Sources: British History Online and Fanshop-Online.

 

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4th January 2007

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - RADSTOCK and CIRENCESTER in GLOUCESTERSHIRE in ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

Once a Saxon settlement the Romans made Radstock a more significant place, now sitting on the Fosse Way, but it was during the industrial revolution, in the late 18th century, that Radstock’s importance became more apparent. With the demands of coal and coke to fuel the industry’s machinery Radstock was ideally placed, such so that the Somerset & Dorset and the Great Western Railway both established stations and marshalling yards in the town. In 1901 it was reported that the Radstock area employed nearly 5,500 miners and produced over 900,000 tons of coal.

Cirencester was an important settlement during Roman times. At this point it was the second largest town in England, after London. By 407AD the Romans had returned to their homeland and Cirencester ceased to be a town as people drifted away to the countryside. In 577 the Saxon invasion reached the south-west and Cirencester was captured, along with Gloucester and Bath. Still a village, a Saxon settlement was created near the Roman remains. As the Middle Ages progressed the town grew much larger, becoming a farming centre for the local area. In 1117 King Henry I founded an Abbey at Cirencester which, over the years, began to dominate the area. The town gradually grew rich on the back of the wool trade and, as prosperity increased, wealthy citizens gave money to expand the parish church and make it more ornate. The Abbey closed in 1539 and the building cannibalized. Today only a Norman arch remains.

Sources: Radstock4u and Local Histories.org

 

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26th December 2006

An early update this week as I'm off to France for a break. Next weeks update will depend on me being able to find an internet cafe that's open. So, fingers crossed. Have a good New Year everyone.

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - BARTON St DAVID and BLERIOT LA PLAGE in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

In 1636, Henry Adams, a local farmer, left Barton St David and emigrated to New England in America. The Adam’s family went on to propagate an illustrious line, literary and political, including the United States Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams. There is a memorial plaque placed inside the village church of St David, erected by a descendant in 1926. The church has a perpendicular tower, the only one in Somerset which is octagonal from the ground.

Situated on the southern outskirts of Calais, Blériot is so named to commemorate the historic first crossing, by flight, of the English Channel. On July 19th 1909 Hubert Latham attempted a crossing only to ditch his plane into the channel after his engine failed. Six days later, at dawn, Louis Blériot prepared himself. Walking on crutches, due to a burn to his foot in an earlier incident, he gave his crew the signal to release his small wood and fabric aeroplane. After a clean take off he soon out paced his naval escort ship, Escopette, which carried his wife Alicia. Travelling at just over 40mph, at an altitude of 250ft, it was thirty six minutes after his departure that he finally placed his plane on English soil, near Dover Castle. His daring effort was rewarded with the prize of £1,000 from the London Daily Mail.

I hope you all have a super New Year's Eve and that 2007 brings all the things you wish for.

Source: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Bleriot.com.

 

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25th December 2006

I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a big THANK YOU for visiting my site over the last 12 months. May your presents match your presence.

 

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21st December 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - LYDFORD-ON-FOSSE and more pictures added at TINTINHULL, also WHITWELL on the ISLE OF WIGHT added in GALLERY 2.

The village of Lydford-on-Fosse straddles the ‘Fosse Way’, an ancient Roman road that once linked the cities of Exeter and Lincoln. It also marked the western frontier of Roman rule in Britain for the first few decades after the invasion in A.D.43. It is the only Roman road in the country that is still called by its original Latin name and is remarkable for its extremely direct route. From Lincoln to Ilchester, Somerset, a distance of 182 miles (293km), it is never more than 6 miles from a straight line. The word Fosse is derived from the Latin Fossa, meaning ditch.

The Hundred of Tintinhull came about when King Alfred divided the English counties into Hundreds. As was usual in Somerset the Saxons avoided the Roman roads when siting their villages, so that Tintinhull is attractively grouped around a triangular village green to the south-east of the old Fosse Way. Many of the houses are built of Hamstone, once quarried from nearby Ham Hill. St Margaret's church dates back to the early 13th century and the stone for repairs to the churchyard wall, in 1518, was taken from the ruins of Montacute Castle. In 1642 the church was raided by Roundhead troops, who contented themselves with taking two surplices which they cut up and handed out to the poor.

Whitwell takes its name from the White Well, a place of pilgrimage during medieval times. The well can still be seen down a track opposite the church. The church was built in two parts and was made one in the 16th century when the dividing wall was pulled down. The local pub, The White Horse Inn, claims to be the oldest on the island, with some of its walls dating back to the 15th century.

Sources: Wikipedia, Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush, The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation of Women’s Institutes and the website Wight Stay.

 

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14th December 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HUISH EPISCOPI and LA MADDALENA in SARDINIA added in GALLERY 2.

By the end of the 12th century the Manor of Huish was controlled by the Bishop of Bath, providing the attachment of Episcopi (of the Bishop) to the village name. Huish is a Saxon word meaning household. Romano-British remains, including burials, coins and tesserae of the 3rd & 4th century have been periodically found nearby. The 15th century church tower was featured on a British postal stamp in 1972.

The town of La Maddalena is the largest settlement on the island of Maddalena, where the town gets its name. It contains a busy harbour and splendid 18th century buildings with wrought iron balconies. The island is one of seven, known collectively as Arcipelago Di La Maddalena. Maddalena and Caprera, the two largest, are connected by a narrow mobile bridge. Caprera was the last resting place of Giuseppe Garibaldi, his house now a museum dedicated to him. The islands were declared a national park in 1994 and can only be reached by boat, with regular ferries leaving Palau.

Sources: Somerset the Complete Guide by Robin Bush and the Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federation of Women’s Institutes & Sardinia Pocket Guide.

 

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7th December 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - BALTONSBOROUGH and more pictures added at DUNSTER, also MELKSHAM in WILTSHIRE added in GALLERY 2.

Meaning ‘Bealdhun’s Hill (or Barrow) Baltonsborough is considered to be the birthplace of St Dunstan. Born in 925 he became one of the greatest figures in the Anglo Saxon church. He rose to become Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey and then the Archbishop of Canterbury. The 15th century village church is dedicated to him. St Dunstan crowned King Edgar in Bath in 973 and devised the coronation service which has formed the basis for all subsequent English coronations.

At one time Dunster was a medieval port but the progressive silting up of the Avill estuary led to its abandonment, after the 17th century, in favour of Minehead. The octagonal Yarn Market was built by George Luttrell, then living in the family home of Dunster Castle, in 1609. On Graddist Hill, just above the village, Mrs Alexander composed the well known hymn All Things Bright and Beautiful.

There has been a settlement at Melksham since Saxon times, its name deriving from the old English word for milk, meoloc. As the area has a long association with pasture and dairy farming the name is rather appropriate. The earliest buildings to be found in the town are from the 17th century. In 1738 a leading clothier, Henry Coulthurst, had his house and mills wrecked by weavers during a dispute over wages. Troops were sent in to restore order and some of the rioters were tried with three being executed. There were further riots in 1747 & 1750 and Dragoons were sent to the town on each occasion to help keep order.

Sources: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush, Somerset Villages by Paul Newman and Wiltshire County Council.

 

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30th November 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - VOBSTER, also WISSANT in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

Vobster is a small hamlet to the west of Mells and was probably founded to house clothworkers, as the earliest fulling mills were in their vicinity. Subsequently the area was dominated by quarries and colleries, all now disused. Vobster became a seperate parish to Mells in 1852.

Wissant is located on the coast 18.5km south of Calais in the Nord Pas-De Calais region of France. Because of it's close proximity to to England it has been used as a launching point for many an invasion. It is believed that the troops of Julius Caesar left from here for the first Roman invasion of England in 55BC. In 1738 a violent storm caused sand to cover 63 houses in the village in one night and another major storm in 1777 finished off what was left. Couragous locals took it on themselves to rebuild their homes behind where the old one had stood. It is this settlement that we see today. After the Napoleonic wars artists such as Turner, Manet and Boudin came to the area attracted by it's lanscape and light.

 

Sources: Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and www.ville-wissant.fr.

 

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23rd November 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - SHEPTON MONTAGUE and more pictures added at CROSCOMBE & PORLOCK WEIR. Also NITON on the ISLE OF WIGHT added in GALLERY 2.

The name Shepton Montague, derives from it being a 'sheep settlement' (Shepton) and from it being held in 1086 by Drew de Montagu. During the Civil War in 1647, a Puritan clergyman was killed here by Cavaliers and a local man was shot dead on his doorstep by Roundheads two years later. The church of St Peter was gutted by fire in 1964. The restoration was completed in 1966. It includes a contribution by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II of the Royal Arms that reside above the south door. This was to replace a 1672 hatchment that was destroyed.

In early Saxon times (AD 705), Croscombe was known as Correges Cumb and by 1309 as Corscombe. The name actually means 'The valley of the pass way'. A former weaving village, Croscombe contains many interesting relics of it's past, including old mills and a Medieval Squint bridge. The Parish church of The Virgin Mary is part 13th century. It has a tall spire, a rarity in Somerset. Inside, you will find a wonderful example of Jacobean dark oak fittings carved in a variety of heraldic and pastoral designs.

Now a small harbour, Porlock Weir was once an important sea port. The Danes sacked it on a number of occasions during the 10th century. In 1052 Harold, the future King of England, landed here from Ireland to begin a career that would end at the battle of Hastings. Offshore, lies the remains of a submerged forest which is a relic of the last ice age and can be glimpsed at low tide.

Niton is situated at the most southern point of the Isle of Wight and was once a thriving smugglers village. At the end of the 18th century Marconi was living on the island, he used Knowles Farm in Niton as a location for radio experiments. There is an engraved stone at the farm in commemorating his work there.

 

Sources: The Hidden Places Of Somerset, Somerset The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and Wikipedia.

 

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16th November 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - PRESTON PLUCKNETT and MONCONTOUR in FRANCE in GALLERY 2.

Now swallowed up by the western suburbs of Yeovil, Preston Plucknett has one of the many handsome barns still to be seen in Somerset. Abbey Barn, attributed to John Stourton in the 15th century, was lovingly restored after the last World War.

Moncontour is a fortified medieval town in the Cotes d'Amor region of Brittany in France. Every year a medieval fete is held there on the third Sunday of August and is well worth a trip to see the whole town and it's locals enter into the spirit of the occasion. This information comes from a web site which has pictures of the event. Visit the site by clicking here.

 

Sources: Somerset - The Complete Guide by Robin Bush and www.pfv.dircon.co.uk./BCH-4B(Moncontour).

 

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9th November 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HEATHFIELD. This week I have also added A 3D TRIP TO THE TOR on the GLASTONBURY page along with pictures of SANTA TERESA in SARDINIA in GALLERY 2.

In 1166 the village was known as Heathfield Talbot, and later as Heathfield Durborough, after the family who were lords from the mid 14th century. The Manor House is now Manor Farm with it's origins dating from the 16th century. The tower of the church, dedicated to St John the Baptist, dates from the 13th century.

Glastonbury Tor, at 520ft high, offers fantastic views across the Somerset Levels, to the Mendips, the Quantocks and, on a clear day across to the Bristol Channel. The area has been inhabited since prehistoric times and excavations over the years has uncovered evidence of Celtic, Roman and pre-Saxon occupations.

Santa Teresa is a very colourful town and the most northern in Sardinia. The Corsican port of Bonifacio is but a short ferry ride across from here. Stone quarries were once located in the area and the building material for two columns of the Roman Pantheon, as well as portions of the Leaning Tower of Pisa was quarried at Capo Testa, 5km away from the town.

 

Sources: Somerset - The Complete Guide by Robin Bush, The Hidden Places of Somerset & Sardinia Pocket Guide.

 

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2nd November 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - BUCKLAND DINHAM. Also CAP BLANC-NEZ in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

The name Dinham came from the aristocratic Dinan family and the Norman style church was built by Oliver de Dinan in the 12th century.

Across the road from the church is a Guard House, or Blind House, with a tiny barred port hole window. At one time, the lock up for disorderly people.

South of Calais is Cap Blanc-Nez, at 132mtrs it is the highest point on the French coast and, therefore, a wonderful vantage point to see across the English Channel to England.

Many military forces made use of this point over the centuries and the Germans were no exception during WW2. There are many ruined shelters & bunkers and an Obelisk left as evidence.

At one time, there was a memorial placed to commemorate the achievements of the Dover Patrol during WW1 but this was destroyed by the occupying forces during the second great war.

The chalk cliffs are also an important nesting place for the many varied wildlife.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federatiojn of Womens Institute, Wikipedia (German version) and Dover Kent England (www.doverpages.co.uk).

 

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26th October 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - YATTON. Also MAASTRICHT in HOLLAND added in GALLERY 2.

Previously known as Jatune, Eaton and Yatton Blewitt, Yatton has developed over the centuries from a small farming village into a large bustling community. In 1828 the remains of a Roman sepulchre were discovered. In 1884 a mosaic pavement was unearthed on the same site and further digs went on to prove it was all part of a Roman villa with a boat house on the side. There was also evidence to suggest that there was a forge and furnace room within the complex.

The church of St Mary's was known as the Cathedral of the Moors. It is of Norman origin with the present building dating from the 1320's. A spire was added in the 1450's but the top half was removed in 1595 and never replaced.

Maastricht is derived from it's Latin name Trajectum Ad Mosam (Mosa-Crossing) and is situated either side of the river Meuse (Maas in Dutch). The name refers to the bridge built by the Romans under the reign of Augustus Caesar.

It was the first Dutch city to be liberated by Allied troops during WW2 on the 14th September 1944.

In 1992 the Maastricht Treaty was signed here, leading to the creation of the Euro.

Sources - Yatton Parish Council (www.yatton.net) and Wikipedia.

 

 

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19th October 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STOKE St MICHAEL. Also WEYMOUTH in ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

Stoke St Michael is a quiet village nestling between quarries and farms near the foot of the Mendip Hills. Formally known as Stockland and Stoke Lane.

In 1942 the 17th century village pub, The Knatchbull Arms, was the venue for the largest secret assembly of high ranking Officers and Generals in the history of the country. The dignitories included Lord Montgomery and Lord Wavell.

Weymouth has a long history going back to Roman times. In 1347 the port supplied ships and mariners for the siege of Calais in France, and in 1588 more ships were supplied, this time for the fight against the Spanish Armada.

In June 1628 the Abigail sailed from Weymouth carrying local man John Endicott to found another new colony in North America. On 6th September that same year they landed at Naumking (Salem) and from this grew the colony of Massachusetts. John Endicott went on to become the first govener of the colony.

Artist James Thornhill was born in Weymouth in 1675. His huge painting on the interior of the dome of St Pauls Cathedral in London is classed as one of it's glories. He was knighted in 1720.

Weymouth holds the proud record of hosting the Cutty Sark Tall Ships race on three seperate occasions. In 1983, 1987 and 1994. The only port in the world to have done so.

Sources: The Somerset Village Book by the Somerset Federatiojn of Womens Institute and Weymouth & Portland Borough Council web site. (www.weymouth.gov.uk).

 

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12th October 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - PEN SELWOOD and more pictures added at BLAGDON. Also SAINTE-MARINE in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

Blagdon was the first village to be added back in October 2005. So I felt it would be fitting to include more pictures of the village for inclusion in this week's update.

Blagdon Lake was completed in 1899 and attracts water sports participants and anglers as well as a wide variety of waterfowl and other bird life.

Pen Selwood (or Penselwood) was known as Pen until the 19th century and is situated at the southern end of a wooden ridge that formed the core of the ancient forest of Selwood. King Edmund Ironside fought a Danish army there in 1016 and the area has been identified as the site of Conwealh's victory over the Britons in 658.

Sir Arthur Bliss (1891-1975), the composer, lived in the parish from 1935 to 1955 in a house named Pen Pits.

Sainte-Marine is located in the Finistere region of Brittany in France.

Sources: The Hidden Places of Somerset published by Travel Publishing Ltd and British History Online (www.british-history.ac.uk).

 

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5th October 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - UBLEY and LOWER SLAUGHTER in GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

One year ago this month, this web site was launched. The first version was placed online on the 2nd October 2005 and two weeks later this was replaced by the version you now see.

Since then, the site has grown considerably. I find it extremely rewarding to see that the number of people accessing the site has continued to increase throughout the year. Just to emphasize this, the first TWO months online amounted to a total of 479 unique visits (To find out what a unique visit is click here). Last month the site registered the grand total of 2900 visitors looking to check out the latest updates. Up to the end of September 2006, a total of 22,212 unique visits had been made from more than 47 different countries worldwide.

Thank you for continuing to visit the site each week.

Over the next few weeks, there will be more news on what future plans I have for the web site. So please keep coming back!

 

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28th September 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HOLCOMBE and more pictures added at BATCOMBE.

Also NEWPORT on the ISLE OF WIGHT, ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

 

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21st September 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - KENN. Also VANNES in FRANCE added in GALLERY 2.

 

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14th September 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - GODNEY. Also LYME REGIS in ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

 

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7th September 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STRATTON-ON-THE-FOSSE. Also YORK in ENGLAND added in GALLERY 2.

 

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31st August 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WIVELISCOMBE. Also BRUGES in BELGIUM added in GALLERY 2.

 

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24th August 2006

NEW TOWN ADDED - ILMINSTER .

Regular visitors will have noticed that there is now a second gallery to view. This is for all non Somerset related 3d pictures. On my travels I always find the time to take 3d photographs and in GALLERY 2 you will find pictures from other counties in ENGLAND and pictures from other countries that I have visited.

This week I have added pictures of PALAU and PORTO RAFAEL in SARDINIA.

Over the coming weeks there will be more GALLERY 2 pictures added so keep checking the INFO page for updates.

 

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17th August 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - FITZHEAD .

 

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10th August 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HALSE.

 

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3rd August 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - FARRINGTON GURNEY.

 

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27th July 2006

NEW TOWN ADDED - CLEVEDON and more pictures added at STOKE St GREGORY.

 

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20th July 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CHARLTON ADAM.

 

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13th July 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CHEWTON MENDIP.

Many thanks to all of you who sent congratulations messages. Sardinia is a wonderful place to visit. Thanks to Andre, Brigida, Loreta & Francesca in Palau for making us feel so welcome. Now the wedding and honeymoon are over I'll have more time to develop the site to show more 3d pictures from the other places I have visited. Keep checking for updates.

 

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23rd June 2006

Hello everyone. The next update will be on Thursday 13th July as I will be in Sardinia for the next two weeks on honeymoon.

Don't forget to come back.

 

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22nd June 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - LANGPORT and more pictures added at CROSCOMBE.

 

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15th June 2006

This weeks update is a feature on the 100th anniversary of COLLETT DAY in SHEPTON MALLET.

 

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8th June 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - SOUTH BARROW & more pictures added at MARSTON BIGOT.

 

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1st June 2006

NEW TOWN ADDED - WESTON SUPER MARE & more pictures added at FAULKLAND.

 

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25th May 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - NORTH PERROTT.

 

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18th May 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - BABCARY, and more pictures added at PILTON.

 

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11th May 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - KNOLE, and more pictures added at CASTLE CARY.

 

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4th May 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WHATLEY, and more pictures added at EAST LYNG & NUNNEY.

 

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1st May 2006

Hello everyone.

Another new month begins. My regular visitors will notice that all the town & village maps have been changed. After discussions with Multimap, I had to come to a decision to either pay an annual fee or create my own maps. I chose the latter. Clicking on the maps will take you to the Multimap web site. I'd like to express my thanks to them for their understanding and patience.

 

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27th April 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - COSSINGTON.

 

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20th April 2006

NEW VILLAGES ADDED - EAST COKER and MILTON CLEVEDON.

 

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6th April 2006

NEW VILLAGES ADDED - DINDER and STON EASTON. Also more pictures added at NORTHMOOR GREEN.

Next update will be on April 20th as I will be on my Easter holidays next week. Have a good Easter.

 

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30th March 2006

NEW VILLAGES ADDED - DURSTON and WEST COKER.

 

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23rd March 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - ALHAMPTON.

 

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16th March 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - SUTTON MONTIS and more pictures added at UPTON NOBLE & SOUTH HORRINGTON VILLAGE.

 

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9th March 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - MONTACUTE.

 

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2nd March 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - HASELBURY PLUCKNETT and more pictures added at MELLS.

 

 

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23rd February 2006

NEW VILLAGES ADDED - RODE & BECKINGTON.

Following on from last weeks article in the Shepton Mallet Journal I am pleased to announce that 3d glasses are now available to buy from the Tourist Information & Heritage Centre in Shepton Mallet.

 

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16th February 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - STOKE St GREGORY.

The web site is featured in this weeks edition of my local newspaper, the Shepton Mallet Journal. You'd best make sure you get your copy before I get there. Thanks to Carol Vincent for the article.

 

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10th February 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - NORTON ST PHILIP and more pictures added at REDLYNCH.

 

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5th February 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - NORTH BARROW and more pictures added at CRANMORE.

 

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29th January 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - EAST QUANTOXHEAD.

 

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22nd January 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - NORTH CURRY.

I have updated the INFO page and added more links to more sites on Somerset and 3d photographs. Visit the top of the page to find out more.

 

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15th January 2006

More pictures added at BATHAMPTON, DOULTING & GLASTONBURY.

 

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6th January 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - MUCHELNEY.

 

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1st January 2006

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - WEST HARPTREE.

A happy New Year to you all.

 

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24th December 2005

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - KILVE, and more pictures added at BRUTON and SOMERTON.

I hope you all have a smashing Christmas and here's to a peaceful New Year..

 

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17th December 2005

More pictures added at CORSTON, OAKHILL, QUEEN CAMEL and WANSTROW.

 

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11th December 2005

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - TINTINHULL, and more pictures added at SHEPTON MALLET .

 

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8th December 2005

UPDATE PROBLEMS UPDATE - Problem fixed at last.

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - DUNSTER, and more pictures added at CHESTERBLADE & WEDMORE.

 

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6th December 2005

UPDATE PROBLEMS - Hello everyone. As my internet connection is down at the moment I will be unable to provide any updates. I am assured by BT that they are doing all they can to find and rectify the fault but, until it's fixed, I can only sit and wait. As soon as the problem is fixed I will load the next update. Thank you for your support.

 

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27th November 2005

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - CROSCOMBE, and more pictures added at LIMINGTON & SOUTH CADBURY.

 

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20th November 2005

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - PORLOCK WEIR.

 

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13th November 2005

NEW VILLAGE ADDED - BLAGDON.

 

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22nd October 2005

SOMERSET 3D version 2 launched for testing. Hopefully this version will be better for dial up users. Let me know what you think please.

Reports suggest a much better performance though large pictures can still take time to load. I decide to accept this as anaglyphs rely on quality.

 

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17th October 2005

After response from testing the web site will be modified slightly to improve performance for dial up users. Official launch delayed as a consequence.

 

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2nd October 2005

SOMERSET 3D WEB SITE LAUNCHED FOR TESTING

 

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19th July 2005

Construction of the Somerset 3D web site starts.

 

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