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***Speakin Zummerzet***

As people travel and relocate, the old words and dialects are gradually changing and being lost. So ‘Speakin Zummerzet’ is an attempt to redress the balance. Each week I’ll introduce a word or phrase once commonly used in the county and make an effort to provide it’s meaning, along with an example of its use. The words and phrases shown below are ones that I personally have used or heard used by relatives and friends over the years. The icon denotes an audio example is available to listen to via Windows Media Player.

It must be stressed that not all Somerset folk speak this way today and some may be offended if you think they do.

Don't forget to scroll down for earlier entries.

Please note that the video entries can now be viewed via WMA and AVI should you not have Adobe Flash installed. Click here for more.

Speakin Zummerzet is on .

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28th Octowburr 2010

OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET

Finally we have reached part four, and the last instalment of the basics with OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET. A chance for you to learn some Zummerzet over the coming months so that, when you visit us next year you'll be understood by, and be able to understand the locals.

Basics: Week 4

After finding out where you work the local may ask about your hobbies and interests.

The conversation could be something like this: Local, “whad dooeedo inyer spur tyme thun?” (“What do you do in your spare time then”?). Obviously, like the ‘What do you do for a living’ question last week there are numerous possible answers to this. A list of possible hobbies and interests are shown below and, as always, a free translation if open to offer should you not find you particular interest on the list. So, your reply could be “Eye’m Priddy keen on vitograffee akchewlee” (“I’m pretty keen on photography actually”) or “Eye’m currunlee avin lezzons on thee pee-anno” (“I’m currently having lessons on the piano”). The local may continue “Dooee du n e sporse?” (“Do you do any sports?”) to which there are a multitude of replies (see below) but could be as follows: “Ah, eye tern owt vor me lowcall vitbull/nitbull teem” (“Yes, I turn out for my local football/netball team”).

There you have it. In four weeks you have learnt how to speak to the Zummerzet local and to be able to reply and be understood. Well done.

Below is a recap of this week’s phrases with the word for word translation followed by what we’d actually say.

“What do you do in your spare time then”? - Word for word translation:  “whad dooeedo inyer spur tyme thun?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Whadooedoo wen e’snot werkin?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“I’m pretty keen on photography actually” - Word for word translation:  “Eye’m priddy keen on vitograffee akchewleeCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Eye lyke tu tayke pikchurs”.CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“I’m currently having lessons on the piano” - Word for word translation: Eye’m currunlee avin lezzons on thee pee-annoCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say:Eye mavin uh goo aht lernin thee keebored”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Do you do any sports?” - Word for word translation: Dooee du n e sporse?”CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Ow du e stay hin shayp?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Yes, I turn out for my local football/netball team” - Word for word translation: Ah, eye tern owt vor me lowcall vitbull/nitbull teemCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Eye git me kitton at thee wickens wen eye’m pikked”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

List of Interests, hobbies and sports.

Stamp Collecting – Stam Clektin
Gardening – Gardnin
Family Tree – Vamlee Dree
Writing – Rye-tin
Painting – Payne-tin
Horse riding – Orce rye-din
Cricket – Krik-eh
Bowls – Bows
Skittles – Skiddles
Golf – Goff
Hockey - Ockee

21st Octowburr 2010

OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET

We continue with part two of the basics with OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET. A chance for you to learn some Zummerzet over the coming months so that, when you visit us next year you'll be understood by, and be able to understand the locals.

Basics: Week 3

After finding out details of you and your family the conversation would probably continue as follows:

Whad dooee du vor uh livin?” (“What do you do for a living”), the reply to this question would start “eye wirr caht/az uh...” (“I work at/as a...”).  To provide a list of all the jobs you could be doing would be difficult, but I have listed below some common jobs that you could be doing. Please email me if you wish to know how to say what you do if it isn’t shown on the list. The conversation continues; “Av e bin thur long?” (“Have you been there long?”). Your reply would be either “Ah, bin thur vor zum tyme” (“Yes, been there for some time”) or “Whale, tiz ackchewlee zummit eye’ve juss stardid” (“Well, it’s actually something I’ve just started”).  “Zounz inneresin, whadelz av e dun?” (“Sounds interesting, what else have you done?”). Again, the response could be quite varied. Start by saying “Bevore whad eye du now eye ewesed tu werk aht/az .....” (“Before what I do now I used to work at/as ....”).

So, the local now knows much more about who you are and what you do. Don ’t forget to ask him/her similar questions and find out more about them. The local will be pleased that you are showing an interest in them.

As usual we’ll finish by recapping on this week’s phrases with the word for word translation followed by what we’d actually say.

“What do you do for a living” - Word for word translation:Whad dooee du vor uh livin?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Wirr dooee git yer munee vrom?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“I work at/as a...”  - Word for word translation:eye wirr caht/az uh...CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Eye spen me tyme iht/doin...”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Have you been there long?” - Word for word translation:Av e bin thur long?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Ow long bin doin thah vor?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

(“Yes, been there for some time”) - Word for word translation:Ah, bin thur vor zum tymeCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Ah, bin thur var tu long iffee asskye”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Well, it’s actually something I’ve just started”  - Word for word translation:Whale, tiz ackchewlee zummit eye’ve juss stardid”  CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Tiz zummut toe tlee nu twye”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Sounds interesting, what else have you done?” - Word for word translation:Zounz inneresin, whadelz av e dun?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: O ah, av e dun n e vin else?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Before what I do now I used to work at/as ....” - Word for word translation:Bevore whad eye du now eye ewesed tu werk aht/az .....CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Eyve dun awl zorts eye ave. Led eye telly abough tidall”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR


List of jobs and their translations:

College – Collige
Factory = Vaktree
Farmer – Varmur
Lorry driver – Larry dryver
Nurse – Nerz
Office = Ovize
Policeman – Pleece-mun
Supermarket – Zoopur markeh
Student – Stewdunt
Teacher – Teechur


The final part of Ollerday Zummerzet Basics is next week.

14th Octowburr 2010

OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET

We continue with part two of the basics with OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET. A chance for you to learn some Zummerzet over the coming months so that, when you visit us next year you'll be understood by, and be able to understand the locals.

Basics: Week 2

Right, let’s continue where we left off last week.


After the initial introduction we then move on to finding out more about each other. So the conversation may continue like this:
The local may ask “Dooee av n e vamlee?” (“Do you have any family?”) to which you could reply “Ah, eye’ve tu bruvers anna zizter, awl owder thun eye” (“Yes, I have two brothers and a sister. They are all older than I”). The local then may ask about your marital status, “Be e spoekun vor?” (“Are you married?”) and your reply would be “Ah, iz/er nayme be ......” (“Yes, his/her name is .....”) or if you are single “Nah, no wun owt thur tave eye” (“No, no one out there would have me”). If you are not married but do have a partner you could reply “Nah, eye bain’t marreed buh eye du ave uh boyvren/gurvren cawd ....” (“No, I’m not married but I do have a boyfriend/girlfriend called ....”). Then the local may enquire about your parents, saying something like “Be yer volks steel aroun?” (“Are your parents still alive?”) to which your reply would “Ah, theym steel kickin” (“Yes, they’re still going”) or if they are not “Zadlee noht, thay past aweigh zum tyme uhgo” (“Sadly not, they passed away some time ago”).


As you can see the Zummerzet local can be quite inquisitive, some would say nosey. There is a reason for this. If the local is to become your friend and let you in to their world they need to know that you are someone they can trust. Someone who is reliable and someone who will give as well as take. The Somerset local is one of the most hospitable kind there is, as are most West Country folk, but they don’t take kindly to being used. History has shown that invaders to the country, Vikings, Romans etc, have found it difficult to take over and control the West Countryman.
Perhaps it was nothing more than they couldn’t make themselves be understood, don’t let that happen to you. Study your Zummerzet and in no time you will feel and home and be at one with us all.


Let’s recap on this week’s phrases with the word for word translation and what we’d actually say guide:


“Do you have any family?” - Word for word translation:  “Dooee av n e vamlee?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Wirrs thee ress ov thee?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Yes, I have two brothers and a sister. They are all older than I” - Word for word translation:Ah, eye’ve tu bruvers anna zizter, awl owder thun eyeCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Ah, goh tu owder bruvers annan owder zizder tu”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Are you married?” - Word for word translation:Be e spoekun vor?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Swanna zidown nex tu eye?”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Yes, his/her name is .....” - Word for word translation:Ah, iz/er nayme be ......CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Ah, eye cawlim/cawler ...”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“No, no one out there would have me” - Word for word translation:Nah, no wun owt thur tave eyeCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Core snot, Eye’ve bin way tin vor ewe anneye!” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

No, I’m not married but I do have a boyfriend/girlfriend called ....” - Word for word translation:Nah, eye bain’t marreed buh eye du ave uh boyvren/gurvren cawd ....CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say:Eye du ave zum won eye zee hat thee wicken, buh var tu bizee tu tayk ih tennee vurver ih thee momen”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Are your parents still alive?” - Word for word translation:Be yer volks steel aroun?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Av e ad yer in hairy tense azyet, oar be thee pairunce steel aroun?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Yes, they’re still going” - Word for word translation:Ah, theym steel kickinCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Lass tyme eye zid em thay wirr thur”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Sadly not, they passed away some time ago” - Word for word translation:Zadlee noht, thay past aweigh zum tyme uhgoCLICK HERE TO HEAR - What we’d actually say: Thaym now werkin unnergroun”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR


Part three of Ollerday Zummerzet Basic next week.

7th Octowburr 2010

OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET

This week see's the start of OLLERDEE ZUMMERZET. A chance for you to learn some Zummerzet over the coming months so that, when you visit us next year you'll be understood by, and be able to understand the locals. We'll start with the basics first and then continue on to subjects such as 'Eating out', 'Travel', 'Shopping' and much more.

Basics: Week 1


So, you arrive in Somerset and you are approached by a friendly local who says “Ow bist?” (“How are you”) you reply “Aw rye van Q, an u?” (I’m fine thank you, and you?”).  The local will usually reply with “Ah” (“Yes”).  Then the local says “Wirr be u vrom then?” (“Where are you from”) and you reply thus, “Eye’m vrom Vrance or Jermunee, Spayne, Ihtuhlee, Ollund, Uhmaryka” (I’m from France or Germany, Spain, Italy, Holland, America). The local continues, “Thay cawl eye...,” (“My name is”) stating his/her name. You reply back “Ah, meye nayme be ...” (“Oh, my name is”) stating your name, and so on.


Most of the above you’ve already seen from previous posts on this website. However, learning how to speak a new language doesn’t mean it’s going to be easy understanding it when they talk back. In my attempts to learn some French I’ve found the hardest bit is being able to understanding the reply to my question. In most cases they use words I haven’t learnt yet and they also speak too fast, making the sentence sound like one long word. There is a very good chance you will have the same problem with Zummerzet.


Try this next phrase to encourage the local to slow down his/her delivery:

Eye’m zorree, eye, doughn unnerstan. Cud e speek uh liddle zlower pleeze?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

This is the word for word translation of, “I’m sorry, I don’t understand. Could you speak a little slower please?”

What we’d actually say is, “Whah? Cassen unnerstan wahdees juss zed. Cassen e speek zlower, iffee doughn mine?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Feel free to use either version.

The local will either smile and do their best to help, or raise their eyebrows and sigh, then smile and use hand gestures whilst saying the same thing again, only louder.

Most locals, in any country, will help you with their language if they see that you’re making an effort. The same applies in Somerset, but there are still some that see it as your responsibility to get it right, and their help may be hard to obtain. Don’t let that put you off. Once you’ve gained their respect you will find that you have a friend for life. Just be prepared to be laughed at in the local pub when you get it wrong.


Below are some notes on some on this week’s phrases explaining what we’d actually say rather than the word for word translation.


“How are you?” - Word for word translation:Ow be e?” - What we’d actually say:Ow bist?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Please” - Word for word translation:Pleeze” - What we’d actually say:Iffee dougn mineCLICK HERE TO HEAR

“I come from ...”  - Word for word translation:Eye cum vrom ...”  - What we’d actually say:Eye baint vrom rown yer.” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Hello”  - Word for word translation:Uhllo.”  - What we’d actually say:Awrye?” or “Ow be onCLICK HERE TO HEAR

“My name is ...” - Word for word translation:Me nayme be ...” - What we’d actually say:Thay cawl eye ...CLICK HERE TO HEAR

“Thank you” - Word for word translation: “Van Q” - What we’d actually say:Cheers

 

There will be more on the basics for Ollerday Zummerzet next week.

NB: I am aware the audio quality isn't to good and that you have to download the file to hear it. I'm working on trying to improve both.

30th Septumburr 2010

Gramfer Croojer


Ere, ahva luk unner thik ztone, tiz vull ov gramfer croojers CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

Hey, have a look under that stone, it is full of woodlouse”.


When I was a lad we’d always call woodlouse ‘Gamfer Croojers’ and it wasn’t until recently that I found this to be quite a common ‘Zummerzet’ term. I’d always thought it was something more unique to my family.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

23rd Septumburr 2010

Snuff


Snuff voreye, eye’m flup van q CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

That’s enough for me, I am full thank you

 

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

16th Septumburr 2010

Dew

Dew git thik johb ah thee varm yesty?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

Did you get that job at the farm yesterday?”

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

9th Septumburr 2010

Eye’ll giddit tuwee eye awl CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

I’ll give it to you I will


This is a threat, made to warn you off of continuing doing what you are doing.

Issued by my Great Grandfather often to my mother.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

2nd Septumburr 2010

This week I ask another 'What if ...'

Click the play button below to find out more.

You will need to allow the ActiveX controls when prompted by your browser in order to see the video.

Hover your mouse over the black square above for controls to appear.

After the opening credits you may need to up the volume to hear the dialogue, blame the sound editor.

The video may freeze during playback. Try letting it run through and then playing it again and the second run should play ok.

For some reason I'm unable to upload Quicktime or Windows Media Video (WMV) versions.

 

26th Awguss 2010

Ant


Ere, ant erd vrom yer yungun vor a wile CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

Hey, haven’t heard from your brother for a while”.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

 

19th Awguss 2010

Wernit


Ere, thah were yer yungin wernit? CLICK HERE TO HEAR


Or


Hey, that was your younger brother wasn’t it?”

 

Wernit really means 'were it not' but most of the population would not say 'were it not' today and instead would say 'wasn't it'.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

 

12th Awguss 2010

Swannit


Ewe canav whaddy wan iffee relee swannit CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

You can have what you want if you really want it”.

 

There is also 'Swantoo' as in "Iffee relee swantoo" or "If you really want to".

 

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

5th Awguss 2010

Ed lice


E woan zee nuffin wee owt is ed lice on CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

He won’t see anything without his head-lights on”.

There is also Stree lice, lectric lice, vut lice etc.

 

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

29th Jewlie 2010

Jogger Fee


Eees a septional youngun thissen. Is unner stanin ov Jogger fee be wonnervul CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

He’s an exceptional child this one. His understanding of Geography is wonderful”.


Other school subjects would be:

Moat ten geerin, Is Dree, Fizz iks, Maffs an wunce ayer weed av sporce day.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

22nd Jewlie 2010

Scouse


When a small boy it came a time when it was thought a good idea to make me join a group. Somewhere for me to learn things and get used to being with different people. In their wisdom my parents ‘helped’ me join the ‘Scouse’. I didn’t stay there long. I found the camp-fire songs they’d sing (Ging-Gang-Goolley etc) all rather silly.

I did join the ‘Hay-tea-sea’ for a while though. That was much more fun. I was lucky enough to fly a Chipmonk training plane for a short time and loved every minute of it.

What about you, what after school activity clubs did you have to go to?

15th Jewlie 2010

Door


The opposite of ‘zun’.


Most mothers want a ‘door’ whilst most fathers would prefer a ‘zun’.


To many an ideal family is to have one ‘door’ and one ‘zun’.

8th Jewlie 2010

Coal Snaw


A well known venue in Brissle.

Eym uh Brissle affer werk zeein Gursloughd ah Coal Snaw CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

I’m in Bristol after work seeing Girs Aloud at Colston Hall”.

 

 

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

1st Jewlie 2010

Counts Louse


Used like this,

Ees bin on thee counts louse wane-liss verages”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

He’s been on the council house waiting list for ages”.

So, Counts Louse = a dwelling that is inhabited by rate payers to the local government.

 

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

24th Jewne 2010

Ann Summer


No, it’s not what you think, it’s as follows;


Heard when discussing a new-born.

I gotter zay tha tees ann summer tha niz vavver CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

I have to say that he’s more handsome than his father

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

17th Jewne 2010

Rumatics


Used like this.


Stime eye wen tu thee quacks az me rumatics be plain up CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

It’s time I went to the doctors as my Rheumatism is playing up”.

 

As you can see the word has been changed considerably into a Zummerzet word of its own.

 

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

10th Jewne 2010

Continuing with a previous entry listed below are more Somerset place names and how to pronounce them like a local does.

Alford - Awverd

Baltonsborough - Baw-uns-bruh

Batheaston - Baffeeson

Buckland Dinham - Buklun Dinnum

Chesterblade - Chesserblay

Cothelstone - Coffulstun

Dunster - Dunce-der

Minehead - Myned

Portishead - Porse-ed

Prestleigh - Press-lee

Shepton Montague - Shep-mm Mohn-a-goo

South Cadbury - Souwf Cabree

 

3rd Jewne 2010

V for F


In Zummerzet we pronounce the F at the beginning of a word as a V. Examples are shown below.


Vih = Fit (To pronounce the ‘ih’ correctly think of saying the word 'Fit' as normal but without sounding the T at the end).

Vit = Feet

Velh = Felt

Vrend = Friend

Vust - First

Vellor - Fella

Vront = Front

and so on.

If the F is in the word, as opposed to being the first letter, then it’s usually pronounced normally, as an F, though there can be some exceptions. Unfortunately (or unvortunatly) there are no hard and fast rules with this. The more you speak it the more you'll understand when to pronounce the F and when to replace it with a V.

A double F will be a combination of the two.The first F pronounced as an F and the second as a V.

E.G. Effort would be pronounced as Efvert.

 

27th May 2010

Arh’un


Used as shown below.


Ere, theart nu ere arh’un”? CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

Hey, you’re new here aren’t you”?

 

Some good Anglo Saxon here with 'Theeart' (Thee as in you and Art as in are).

Thanks to my mother for thissen.

Click the speaker to hear some Zummerzet.

20th May 2010

Silent E


In Zummerzet the ‘E’ at the beginning of a word is nearly always silent.


Examples are:


Leh’ric - Electric

Murguncy – Emergency

Venchewlee – Eventually

Lastic  ban – Elastic band

Viromehn – Enviroment

Yurp – Europe

Zacklee – Exactley

 

13th May 2010

Thicken &Thissen


Wah shallus ewes, thicken ore thissen”? CLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

What shall we use, that one or this one”?

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

6th May 2010

Thissle


Used as shown:

Avee zeen me ammer? Doughn bovver, thissle doCLICK HERE TO HEAR

or

Have you seen my hammer? Don’t bother, this will do”.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

29th Apreel 2010

Waddle


Used like this:


Waddleedo now thee ole dumans away”? CLICK HERE TO HEAR – “What will you do that that the wife is away”?


Waddle = What will. Usually the next word (or two) are added, as shown. Waddle e do becomes waddleedo.

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

22nd Apreel 2010

Shunnus and Shallus


As in,


Shunnus be gheeing yer missus annand? CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

Shouldn’t we be giving your wife a hand?


And


We’ll wayh an zee if she aahsks shallus? CLICK HERE TO HEAR

Or

We’ll wait and see if she asks shall we?”

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

15th Apreel 2010

Place names.
As in most counties the way the town and village names are spelt are not always the way they are pronounced, especially by locals.

So this weeks’ Speakin Zummerzet provides the reader with a few examples of how to pronounce various names, like a local does.


Bath = Bahff

Bristol = Brissle

Cricket St Thomas = Krikeh Sane Tomas nerchar

East Harptree = Eece Arpdree

Evercreech = Evercritch

Glastonbury = Glahss-un-bree

Glastonbury Festival = Pil’un pop vesteval

Frome = Vroom

Leigh on Mendip = Lie

Pylle = Pill

Tintinhull = Tih’nall

Weston-super-mare = Wessun

Yeovil = Yo-vall

 

8th Apreel 2010

CARNATION


Used like this:


Esoldenuff tu member are kweens carnation snow

or

He is old enough to remember our Queen’s coronation you know”.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

1st Apreel 2010

VOOL


Rather topical this one as it means ‘fool’.


For example “Git thik fing awhey vrom I, ewe zilly vool CLICK HERE TO HEAR


Or “Get that thing away from me, you silly fool”.


In Zummerzet the ‘f’ is usually pronounced as a ‘v’.


So you will get VOOL instead of FOOL, VELT instead of FELT, VORK instead or FORK and so on.

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

25th March 2010

SISTIFFICUT


Used like this;


E did well enuff turn a sistifficut snowCLICK HERE TO HEAR – “He did well enough to earn a certificate you know


This one comes from my father. He’s always called certificates sistifficuts.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

18th March 2010

DIDDEE, DINEYE, DINNUM, DINNUZ.


Nope, not more Latin, just more Zummerzet.


Used like this;


Diddee geh wah I ahstee to?
I zed I ood dineye?
Dinnum offry a bahg?
We zed weed vink o’thee viroment dinnuz

 

Or


Did you get what I asked you to
I said I would didn’t I?
Didn’t they offer you a bag?
We said we’d think of the environment didn’t we


So  DIDDEE means ‘did you’, DINEYE means ‘didn’t eye, DINNUM means ‘Didn’t they’ and DINNUZ means ‘didn’t we’.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

11th March 2010

TUTHERUN


Used like this;


Oi bain’t goin for thik’n I’m goin vor thutherun – “I’m not going for that one I’m going for the other one”.


For TUTHERUN read ‘the other one’.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

4th March 2010

WOODEN & WOOD


Used as shown below;


I wooden ave zed tha”, “Yesee wood”.


Translated as “I wouldn’t have said that”, “Yes you would”.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

25th Febree 2010

COUPIE DOWN


Used like this:


I ad tu coupie down tu zee ih –“I had to crouch down to see it


Coupie down is a term rather than a Zummerzetised word, meaning to crouch

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

18th Febree 2010

HOLLERDAZE


Used as follows;

Whirr be goin ver thee hollerdaze this yer?CLICK HERE TO HEAR – “Where are you going for your holidays this year?”


The word can also be pronounced ‘Hollerdees’.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

11th Febree 2010

This week I ask another 'What if ...'

Click the play button below to find out more.

You will need to allow the ActiveX controls when prompted by your browser in order to see the video.

Hover your mouse over the black square above for controls to appear.

 

4th Febree 2010

BAKKERDS


Used like this;


E almose vell bakkerds dinnerCLICK HERE TO HEAR – “He almost fell backwards didn’t he

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

28th Januree 2010

IFFEE


Used as follows;


Iffee baint innerested then doughn bovver – “If you are not interested then don’t bother


Iffee uses the ‘e’ term to denote ‘you’ or ‘it’. In this usage it means ‘you.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

21st Januree 2010

ANNUM, ANNUS, ANNIE


Don’t worry, I’ve not gone all Latin suddenly.


The words are used as shown below.


They’ve dun a praper job annum?CLICK HERE TO HEAR – “They have done a really good job haven’t they?


Weev bin ear b’four annus?CLICK HERE TO HEAR – “We have been here before haven’t we?


Annie erd a werd I’ve zed?CLICK HERE TO HEAR – “Haven’t you heard a word I have said?


So Annum means Haven’t THEY, Annus means haven’t WE and Annie means haven’t YOU.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

14th Januree 2010

WHAT IF .........


This week I offer you a question. Click the play button below to find out more.

You will need to allow the ActiveX controls when prompted by your browser in order to see the video.

Hover your mouse over the black square above for controls to appear.

Want to buy the original movie? Then go to the store by clicking here.

 

 

 

7th Januree 2010

SKOOZE


Used like this:


Skooze I, dooee mine ifeye askee zummat?

Excuse me, do you mind if I ask you something?


As with a lot of dialects only a portion of the whole word is selected, and then Zummerzetized.

 

Oh, an appy nu yer to e all.

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

9th Jewlie 2009

Ole Duman


The Ole Duman is a wife.

The Zummerzet man would call her the Ole Duman to his mates in the pub or at work, an example follows;

“Well, muss beoff owm, bahk to thee ole duman”

(Well, I must be off home, back to the wife”).

A man would rarely call their wife this to their face.

It is not really a derogative term, though perhaps not the most eloquent either.

 

This will be the last Speakin Zummerzet entry for this year. Fear not, the feature will return in the New Year.

This will give me time to compile yet more Zummerzet words and phrases for your pleasure.

Thank you for visiting this page of Somerset3d.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

2nd Jewlie 2009

Zmar-in.


This word is used when someone is speaking about somebody who is upset and bears a grudge.

They would say something like “Ah, e b zmar-in abough zummit I’ll tell e” CLICK HERE TO HEAR

(“Yes, He is upset about something I can tell you”).

When it is said it implies that the person in question is looking for revenge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

24th Jewne 2009

Aarr, Yarr & Aahh

A lot of films portray the west countryman as saying Aarr when meaning yes. If you have seen the brilliant film Hot Fuzz,

filmed in Wells and the surrounding area, the word Yarr is used instead of the word Yes. As far as I am aware these words are

not used in the area of Zummerzet I live. At least, in all my 47 years of living in this area of the county I cannot remember either word

uttered once.  Around here the word used is Aahh .  This is used instead of saying Yes, or when finding or discovering something.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

17th Jewne 2009

Scrammed.


“Oi be righ scrammed oi be, gee us thik scarff willee?”


Scrammed means cold, really cold. So translated the sentence should read “I am really cold I am, give me that scarf will you?”


Notice the double statement, ‘Oi be’ either side of scrammed. This is also a common Zummerzet trait.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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10th Jewne 2009

Ard Chedder


“Tha’s ard chedder me zonner, buh ah lease yew ad a go”


“That’s bad luck my son, but at least you had a go”.


I’m sure someone out there will be able to tell me more about this phrase but I can only assume it stemmed from the days when Cheddar cheese was only made in Cheddar. I can only surmise that it was a phrase used when a batch didn’t turn out quite right.

 

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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4th Jewne 2009

Shannin


This one comes from my mother who tells me that her Grandfather would be quite comical in his old ways and her and some friends would visit him and make fun of him, as children do. They’d sit out of the way and listen and giggle when he said something that was comical to them. In return he’d look at them and say “Whah be shannin abough?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR meaning “What are you laughing about?”

 

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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28th May 2009

Garn


A ‘garn’ would be essential to every home back in the olden days. A good sized ‘garn’ enabled many to be self sufficient when it came to providing for their family. People took pride in their ‘garn’s’ in these times and were keen to show you around it if you visited. Even when he was  in his 90’s and suffering with his health my late Great Uncle Mike would insist on showing us around his ‘garn’.

After commenting on his health by saying things like “Ah, almose ad me wings yesty”

and “Ah, nuther ard vrost an oi’l be gon”

then he would say “Cmon, leh me showee round me garn”.

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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21st May 2009

Gallyvahn’in.


This word would be used thus;


“Ih’s abough tyme yew were ome, stead of gallyvahn’in ah lover the place”.
CLICK HERE TO HEAR


Or “It’s about time you were home, instead of wandering all over the place”.


Basically ‘Gallyvahn’in’ means to wander about, straying from home.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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14th May 2009

Betwaddled


“Well, oi dunno wha tiz, oi be righ betwaddled”. CLICK HERE TO HEAR
“Well, I don’t know what it is, I am right confused”.


So ‘Betwaddled’ means confused. Another Zummerzet word meaning the same thing would be ‘Fuddled’.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

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7th May 2009

Back House


Long before the days of inside conveniences (or toilets) most houses would have a purpose built shed near the bottom of their garden in which to do their rituals in. I’m sure there were many names for them that I haven’t heard of but the one that I do remember is to call it the ‘Back House’.  

Why it was called that I’m not sure. Yes it was made of brick and had a roof on it but there the similarity to a house ends, but nonetheless, Back House was what it was called.

Can you remember what your outside loo was called?

 

 

 

 

 

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30th Apreel 2009

Addled.


A word often used by harassed wives as they talk about their husbands.


“Didee zee im lass nigh?, e were addled”
. CLICK HERE TO HEAR


Basically ‘addled’ means drunk or out of control due to too much of the local apple juice.


It can also mean ‘gone ‘off. As in;


“Ere, thik mill dougn smell to good, oi fink iht’s addled”.
CLICK HERE TO HEAR

 

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

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23rd Apreel 2009

Whir Beeyum


A question. As in;


“Righ, oi no oi puh em zumwere, now whir beeyum?”
CLICK HERE TO HEAR


“Right, I know I put them somewhere, now where are they?”


This is Anglo-Saxon. The word 'Be' meaning 'are' and the 'um' part replacing 'them'.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

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16th Apreel 2009

The Dancers


Sometimes there’s a phrase rather than a word that I remember being used by one of my ancestors.
Such is the case with this week’s entry.


In one of the Weaver’s cottages in Great Ostry in Shepton Mallet lived my Great Uncle Cliff. He was a WW1 survivor but suffered with poor health due to being gassed when in the trenches. His wife, Elsie, also suffered, being paralysed on one side after having a stroke when their only child miscarried. I would visit them with my mother when I was a toddler and still have strong memories of them. I can remember that Uncle Cliff was bent over from the waist and needed a walking stick to lean on to get around. He only had about three teeth and liked a tin of Mackeson’s Stout. Elsie, despite her stroke, would make ornate table cloths out of lace. Apparently, every time I visited I would ask Uncle Cliff if I could have his war medals when he died. Anyway, I’m digressing rather a lot here.

When they were ready for bed Uncle Cliff would always come out with the phrase;


“Less gid on up thee dancers” CLICK HERE TO HEAR meaning “Let’s get on to bed”.


I don’t really know if this is just a Somerset phrase, he was a Somerset man, or something he picked up when in the Army, either way I associate it with him strongly and, to my mind, it’s these sayings and words that the Speakin Zummerzet feature is more about.


I still have his war medals. I also have one of the table cloths Elsie made too. I’m lucky to have such lovely memories of a lovely couple who, despite their ailments, always came over as happy and content with their lot.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

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9th Apreel 2009

Bide.


Bide has more than one meaning. It can mean to leave alone, as in,

“Doughn go keepin on, let it bide” CLICK HERE TO HEAR "Don't go keeping on, leave it alone".

And it can also be used as an instruction, as in,

“Loohk, stop movin aroun an bide still” CLICK HERE TO HEAR "Look, stop moving around and keep still".

Bide is an Anglo Saxon word well used in Somerset.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

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2nd Apreel 2009

Wooden Eye


A statement. Usually said as a question.


“Well oi wood normly do thah, wooden eye?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR ( “Well I would normally do that, wouldn’t I?”).

My own accent has been cleaned up so that I am understood by non locals, but when with family and friends I will quickly revert to the good ole Zummerzet way of speaking. I like the accent and feel it comes over as friendly rather than stupid. However, I don't feel that anyone of authority would be taken seriously if they did have a strong Zummerzet accent.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

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26th March 2009

Watcher


This is a greeting, a friendly greeting, usually followed by the word “alrigh?”


I can’t really provide any explanation or background to this one but it’s a greeting that is still in use today, though not as frequently as it used to be.
The correct reply would be “Ah, noht too baahd” CLICK HERE TO HEAR, regardless of if you are unwell or not.


In the past the townsfolk and villagers would know everyone in their settlement and this greeting, along with “Ow be on” CLICK HERE TO HEAR, “Yer tiz then” CLICK HERE TO HEAR, and “Alrigh mesun” CLICK HERE TO HEAR were heard throughout the day, being shouted across the roads and lanes. In those days you would need 20-40 minutes extra time to get from one end of town to the other as you greeted and chatted with all the locals, nowadays things have changed. Not necessarily for better or worse, but changed nonetheless. The people who have moved into many of the small towns and villages are not known to the locals and keep themselves to themselves. Most are polite and will acknowledge you with a nod and a smile as you pass them by but to me, it’s not the same. Now, instead of the old Zummerzet being shouted across the streets the sound is of 'locals' greeting each other in languages from all around the world. This is something I have experienced in my lifetime. Changing times.

On a personal note I'd like to wish a "Appy burfday" to my brother. He's 21 with 35 years experience today.

 

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19th March 2009

Tiz, Twas and Twern.


Tiz;


“Yer Tiz then, wherevee bin?” CLICK HERE TO HEAR (
“Here you are then, where have you been?”).


Yer Tiz can refer to a person or an object. For example after looking for something you could exclaim “Ah, yer tiz, vound iht ah-lass” CLICK HERE TO HEAR (“Ah, here it is, found it at last”). Another common phrase is an announcement of arrival or guilt; “Tiz eye” (“It is I”).

 

Twas and Twern are opposites.


’d say “Twas”,or denying something would be “Twern”.
In Zummerzet the sentence would be affirmed at the end, so instead of saying “It was a nice day” the Zummerzet man would say “A niyce day twas” CLICK HERE TO HEAR. The use of ‘Twern’ is usually short and sharp; “Twern eye” CLICK HERE TO HEAR (”It wasn’t I”) or just “Twern” when accused of having done something they didn’t do.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12th March 2009

Zentries


Following on from last weeks’ entry the word this week is Zentries.


This word describes a long period of time, as in;


“Is vamly av bin doin iht ver zentries”
CLICK HERE TO HEAR

(“His family have been doing it for centuries”)


So, ‘Sentries’ = 100’s of yers.

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5th March 2009

Daze, Wicks, Munce & Yers.


‘Daze’ are what makes up ‘wicks’, that in turn make up ‘munce’ that create a ‘yer’.


Examples are ‘Mondee’, ‘Tewsdee’, ‘Whensdee’, etc, The ‘munce’ include ‘Janry’, ‘Febry’ and ‘Awguss’.
CLICK HERE TO HEAR

 

Click the speaker icon to hear some Zummerzet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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26th Febree 2009

Suhn


To happen very quickly. As in “Twer suhn, one momun e wer alrigh, nex e wer gon” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

(“It was sudden, one moment he was alright, next he was gone”).


When something ‘Suhn’ happens people are said to be very ‘sprised’.

As you can see there is a speaker icon at the end of the sentence above. Wherever you see this icon please click on it and you will hear an audio version of the preceeding sentence. At the moment all files are in Windows Media Player format but I hope to convert them into other formats in the near future. Previous entries also have an audio version added, so please scroll down the page to listen to words and phrases that have already been featured.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19th Febree 2009

Clide


“If baint carful youm goin tu clide wiv zummit” 
CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

(“If you are not careful you are going to collide with something”).


So ‘Clide’ means to bump into. Another word meaning much the same thing would be ‘Clision’. Though this is normally used when ‘veercals’ on the road are involved.

 

My attempts at creating audio files for this feature are not going too well, despite having all the kit I just can't get it set up correctly. I will keep at it though and, hopefully, will get it sorted soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12th Febree 2009

Scold


Used like “Put on zummit wharm, scold owtzide”.
CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

(“Put on something warm, its cold outside”).


An ‘S’ in front of another word usually signifies the word ‘It’s’. Other examples are;


‘Swarm’ – Opposite of scold

‘Slate’ – Not early
‘Searly’ – Not late
‘Snice’ – Very pleasant
‘Shores’ – It belongs to you
‘Smine’ – It belongs to me
‘Smee’ – It is me.


The ‘It’ part is said, but once again said so quietly only the ‘s’ is heard.

This past week I have been contacted by an actress asking for help. She is appearing in 'As You Like It' by Shakespeare and was required to speak her part with a Somerset accent. I don’t want to use her real name, so let’s call her Kate Winslet. Ms Winslet sent me some of the lines she had to say and, whilst attempting to translate them I found it difficult to write down some of the required sounds. I offered Kate my mobile number so that she would be able to hear the sounds but she was satisfied with my written suggestions. However, this has given me food for thought. As some of the sounds required are rather difficult to explain in text I have decided to have a go at adding an audio file to this page so that the word or phrase of the week can be heard. Hopefully this addition will be starting in the next couple of weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5th Febree 2009

Mir


“Ear, Turn on thic lectric lite willy, oi wan a zee ow oi look in the mir”
CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

(“Turn on the light will you, I want to see how I look in the mirror”).


Another case of a word being abbreviated for ease of use and efficiency (cough!).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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29th Janree 2009

Fax


The truth, as in, “Oi doughn wan n e messin aroun, oi juss wan the fax”.
CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

(“I don’t want any messing around, I just want the facts”).


As this shows we don’t like to waste our consonants if we can help it.

 

 

 

 

 

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22nd Janree 2009

Member?

To recall, remind.

“Member wen e used tu liv yer?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

("Remember when you used to live here?”)


The beginning of the word has not been dropped but just said so quietly that it’s not heard at all. This is common around the West Country.

 

 

 

 

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15th Janree 2009

Acker


To be called ‘Acker’ in Zumerzet is a good thing. It means friend, mate or pal.


One famous Somerstonian, Bernard Stanley Bilk, decided to keep this mantle and is now known all around the world as the housewives favourite clarinettist with his timeless hit ‘Stranger on the Shore’.


In local junior league football the tag was used when a newcomer, whose name couldn't be remembered, was playing. At the beginning of the season, when new teamates were getting to know each other, spectators could easily be misled into thinking that the whole team was named Acker.

The word is still in use but not as frequently as I remember it. But then, I don't get out as much nowadays.

 

 

 

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8th Janree 2009

This wick we veetur the Merguncy Servsez.


In Zummerzet we ave vor merguncy servsez. Pleece, Vire Brigade, Amblunce an Cosegard.
CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

The Pleece work ard at keepin uz zafe an catchin the baddies, the Viremen puh out nasty vires, the Ambluncemen elp volk get to Orsepital an the Cosegard elp volk oove gotten into issues wiv the sea.


My Great Uncle Mike called the Vire Brigade out once when his ‘chimley’ (sic) caught vire. They took a while to arrive and when they did turn up Mikes opening comment was “Oh, I zee you got me card then”!

 

 

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18th Desemburr 2008

How be on? Juss a kwik wurd to tel e Speakin Zummerzet is cummin bak in Janry. Ere's zummat tu fink abou' at Crissmuss.

Don't wurry wha thee eat b'tween Crissmuss an Nu Yer

Wurry on wha thee eat b'tween Nu Yer an Crissmuss

CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

 

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10th Jewlie 2008

This week will be the last 'Speakin Zummerzet' for a while, as I need to spend more time on developing (pardon the pun) my other photography website.

So I'm going to leave you with one of Zummerzet's favourite sons, Adge Cutler.

Adge was born in Bristle (Bristol) in 1930 and was the lead vocalist in the Somerset group 'The Wurzels' and invented the musical genre 'Scrumpy & Western'.

His songs were all about places or people in the county and were sung in his own Zummerzet accent, with the occasional exaggerated Bristolian accent added from time to time. His songs are still sung in the county, with 'Drink up thy zyder' becoming a sort of 'national anthem' for the county.

Plenty of his song titles are classic Zummerzet with 'Thee's Gott'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n, Hassn't?' one of my favourites. It is a song about a young couples' adventures in their new car around Bristle. Translated, the title reads 'You've got to where you can't go back, haven't you?' and sort of means 'You have got into a position where it is impossible to reverse'.







 

 

 

Adge Cutler died in a car crash in 1974, on his way back from a concert in Hereford. He is buried in Nailsea.

Speakin Zummerzet will return, and in the meantime I can only suggest you satisfy your Zummerzet cravings by purchasing a cd of the great man. Click here to visit the Somerset3d store and click on the Somerset Music link, where you'll find a small selection of his cd's you can buy.

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3rd Jewlie 2008

‘It’ instead of ‘at’.

There is a tendency in Zummerzet, at least in the part where I live, to use the word ‘it’ instead of ‘at’.

I noticed this some years ago and have found it quite a common thing over the years. My work colleagues say it daily and come out with things like;

“It the momun” - “At the moment”. CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

“It the wick-end” - “At the weekend”. CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

“E’s it the orse-pit-all” - "He’s at the hospital" (remember the silent ‘t’ in 'orse-pit-all'). CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Though, if 'at' is followed by 'it' then the 'at' is said properly, so you wouldn't hear "E's it it aghen" - "He's at it again" for example.

 

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26th Jewlie 2008

This week featured word is 'Yurp'.

'Yurp' is a continent containing countries such as 'Vrance', 'Porchergul' and ' Ih-ah-lee' to name but a few.

The ‘Yurpeen Vutball Champunships’ are currently being played in ‘Ors-tree-a’ and ‘Swizzerlund’.

Although the Zummerzet folk are travelling further these days, 'Yurp' (or Europe if you still haven't got it) is still the favoured destination for their ‘Hollerdaze’.   

 

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19th Jewne 2008

'Are old dear' and 'Are old man'.

Many moons ago, when I was still at school and had just entered my teens, I was in a car with a recent addition to the school and his father. Archie, as we nicknamed him, had moved with his family to the 'Wess Vingland' from London. During the journey to his house to practise the guitar I asked him a question, to which his reply was "I don't know, I'll have to ask are old dear". His father asked incrediously "Who's 'are old dear'!?". Archie replied, "Our mum, that's what they call them around here". His dad wasn't too pleased to learn that he was referred to as 'are old man'.

This was the first time I was made aware that the rest of the country used different phrases and terms than us in Zummerzet. I'd travelled around the country on holiday before but had never really taken any notice of the different ways in the way we speak.

It should be noted that 'are old dear' or 'are old man' are affectionate terms. The 'are' is how the 'our' sounds when said in Zummerzet.

A few years ago a group of us organised a school reunion and, during our research and attempts to track people down, we learnt that Archie was now a rock star, based in Japan. No, really, check the blog out for the evidence (updated in the morning, UK time).

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12th Jewne 2008

Hello to you all and “How bist?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

A few weeks ago I asked you the question “How be on?”

‘How bist?’ is another way of saying the same thing.

Translated it reads as “How are you?” though the literal translation will drop the ‘you’ off of the question.

Bist is an Anglo-Saxon word.

 

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5th Jewne 2008

The use of the word 'To'.

In itself 'To' is not a Zummerzet word but it is used in a Zummerzet way.

You will hear it used as follows;

"Where be goin to?" ("Where are you going?"). CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

"Where do e work to?" ("Where do you work?). CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

and "Where e bin to?" ("Where have you been?"). CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

So in Zummerzet, used in this way, the word 'To' denotes location. In each case the addition of the

word is unnecessary but, that's what makes it a Zummerzet word.

 

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29th May 2008

This week features the word Baint.

Used as follows;

“I baint tellin e” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

or, in normal English “I ain’t telling you”.

So, baint means ain’t, am not. Literally translated it should read “I be not going to tell you”.

Baint is a culmination of Anglo Saxon and Olde Somerset.

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22nd May 2008

This week's word is Wopse.

“Look out, there’s a gurt big wopse vlying abou’, e’ll sting e iffee get im miffed” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Translates like this;

“Look out, there’s a great big wasp flying around, he will sting you if you upset him”

Wopse is an Anglo Saxon word (Wops) for Wasp and can still be heard by locals today.

Michael Reakes (Uncle Mike)

My Great Uncle Mike (1901-1994) always said wopse and had a fantastic Zummerzet accent. I have some recordings of him speaking about his ancestors and I intend to create some audio files to put on line so that you can hear Zummerzet said properly.

Miffed means  upset, angry, annoyed.

 

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15th May 2008

This week there are two words, Wunnum and Wunner.

Used as follows;

“They’ll aff to cum in wunnum?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

or “E’ll aff to cum in wunner?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

This translates as;

"They will have to come in won't they?" and "He will have to come in won't he?"

As said above wunnum translates as “Won’t they?” The first part, Wunn, has been Zummerzetized© from Won’t and the second part, ‘um’, is a variation of ‘em’ from the word ‘them’, and in the case of ‘Wunner’ the ‘er’ is the Anglo Saxon term for her/him or it.

So Wunnum is the plural of Wunner.

 

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8th May 2008

Hello and may I start by saying “Ow be on then?CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

…or to put it another way, “How are you?

I’ve no idea as to how this phrase has originated but it is one that I can remember being frequently used when I was young(er).

We can work out that ‘ow’ is an abbreviation of ‘how’ and that ‘be’ is the Somerset/West Country term for ‘are’, but I’m as puzzled as you are as to how ‘on’ replaces ‘you’. If any of you can explain this to me please drop me a line (Click here) and I’ll post the explanation on the website. The phrase can also be said without using the final word shown above (then).

By the way, just so you know, should you be the receiver of the phrase the correct response is “Ah, not too bad”.

 

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1st May 2008

This weeks’ word is SHADDIN.

It is used as follows:

Ah, shaddin yesty, an e b a right darling too! CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Translated as;

Yes, she had him yesterday, and he is a beauty too!

Shaddin is the result of bits taken from three words. She, had and him, with the m being replaced with an n and an extra d added for good measure.

Just for the record the words I have featured so far are heard by myself on a regular basis. In the office there are a couple of local lads with reasonably strong accents. I hear them say these words as the days go by and I make use of them as a resource. I used to have a very strong Somerset accent but, for professional reasons, I cleaned it up so that I could be better understood. I will lapse back into the old ways when I’m with my friends and family though.

 

 

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24th Apreel 2008

So, DINNER.

I’m sure you worked it out yet again.

If you did you should be able to understand the following sentence

E made dinner dinner?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Yes, dinner means ‘Didn’t he’.

So the above translates as “He made dinner didn’t he?”

See? It’s easy innit?

The ‘Din’ bit is an abbreviation of the already abbreviated word ‘Didn’t’ and the ‘er’ bit is the traditional Zummerzet/Anglo-Saxon term for ‘he’.

 

 

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17th Apreel 2008

CLAPS – Did you work it out? You did? Then well done.

Yes it means to fall apart, to cave in, to crumple or disintegrate.

As in the following “I were so out of breff I were about to claps” (Don't forget the silent 't's) CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

or "I was so out of breathe I was about to collapse".

This highlights how, when written, Zummerzet can be misunderstood. So when you read these words try to say them out loud, and hear the word properly.

Dinner is next week’s word. Let’s see if you can make it two in a row.

 

 

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10th Apreel 2008

This week features the word ‘ALASKER’.

It can be used like this “Dunno, alasker”. CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Translated as “I don’t know, I’ll ask her”.

When pronouncing ‘alasker’ it is worth noting that the second ‘a’ is longer than the first ‘a’. So the phonectic spelling would be ‘ah-laass-ker’.

Said with the Zummerzet accent it works, but said with any other accent it probably doesn’t.

Next weeks word will be CLAPS. See if you can work out its Zummerzet meaning before next week’s update.

 

 

 

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3rd Apreel 2008

This week’s word is ‘Twurlee’ meaning, ‘to be too soon’.

It could be used as; “I bain’t geh’in up now, its far twurleeCLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

Translated as “I’m not getting up now, it’s far too early”.

This word is a classic example of how one word is made up by how it sounds rather than from the words it’s made up from. It is simply the words “too early” joined together and then ‘Zummerzetized* into a word of its own.

Another word to baffle your friends with should they arrive ‘twurlee’.

*©Somerset3d2008

 

 

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27th March 2008

A collection of words are explained this week. All quite similair in how they work.

They are FLOFF, FLON, FLOVER, FLIN & FLOUT. They sound like a gang in a children's cartoon don't they?

Their use could be as follows;

"E floff is orse an flon the floor, then flover is boots an it is ed on the door,

Then e flin luv wiv the maid oo were doin er chores, an flout wiv is wife oo could take no more". CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED

translated as,

"He fell off his horse and fell on the floor, then he fell over his boots and hit his head on the door,

then he fell in love with the maid who was doing her chores, and he fell out with his wife who could take no more".

So the word FELL has been shortened to FL and then simply attached to ON, OVER, IN, OUT or OFF.

See how many times you can use them when out with your friends this weekend.

 

 

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20th March 2008

This week there are two words, 'Smornin' and 'Saffnoon' ('ah-er-noon' is another option but usually used as a greeting rather than the context as explained below).

Commonly used in phrases such as;

"It's a vrosty un smornin innit? " CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED = "It's a frosty one this morning isn't it?"

and "We'll do tha' saffnoon" CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED = "We'll do that this afternoon".

Both of these words are a good examples of how easy the Somerset dialect is. In this instance we only use the 's' of the word 'this' and attach it to the next word to create one. Outsiders say the language is lazy, we say efficient.

As mentioned in previous posts we do not usually bother with consonants at the end of words. We figure that by the time we've said the first bit of the word you should be able to work out the rest for yourselves.

 

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13th March 2008

This week’s word is ‘Gurt’, meaning ‘Great', but only as in size (Great big) rather than stature (Great Britain).

Commonly used in phrases such as;

"Ere, e's a gurt big young'n inner?" CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED = "Hey, He's great big youngster isn't he?"

and "I 'ad a gurt big dollop of the stuff" = "I had a great big serving of the stuff". A 'Dollop' is a term used to describe one serving of anything, food, medicine, lubricant etc.

As you can see Gurt is followed by big, so in effect they are one and the same. We wouldn't say Gurt on it's own. it would always be 'Gurt big'.

 

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6th March 2008

This week’s word is ‘inner’, meaning ‘isn’t he/it.

Commonly used in phrases such as;

“E’s a brite spark inner?” CLICK TO LISTEN. WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER REQUIRED = “He’s very clever isn’t he?”

and “E’s a bit spensive inner?” = “It’s a bit expensive isn’t it?”

As you can see ‘E’ can mean He or It and the ‘er’ bit of ‘inner’ can refer to He/She or It.

Another thing to remember when speaking Zummerzet is that we rarely finish a word or pronounce the consonants at the end of words.

So the ‘t’ in ‘brite’ is almost silent.

I’ll leave it to you to explain to your friends why you’ve started speaking strangely.

 

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